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1992 Ontario Survey of Public Health Nurses: perceptions of roles and activities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218313
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 May-Jun;85(3):175-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
L W Chambers
J. Underwood
T. Halbert
C A Woodward
J. Heale
S. Isaacs
Author Affiliation
Hamilton-Wentworth Department of Public Health Services, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 May-Jun;85(3):175-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Institutional Relations
Health promotion
Humans
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Public Health Nursing - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
A survey of public health nurses (PHNs) who work in official public health units in Ontario was undertaken to determine whether their perceptions of their roles and activities concurred with a 1990 Canadian Public Health Association report which describes the roles and qualifications of public health nursing in Canada. The survey questionnaire was completed by 1,849 PHNs in all 42 public health units (response rate = 85%). About one tenth of the PHNs reported no activity as a caregiver/service provider. Most PHNs reported being active in the roles of educator/consultant, social marketer, and facilitator/communicator/collaborator. The community developer, policy formulator, research/evaluator, and resource manager/planner/coordinator roles were less frequently performed, however, increased activities in such roles were expected in the future. Nurses said that they needed further preparation to perform the latter roles. These results have implications for deployment of PHNs as Ontario's health system shifts to community health and health promotion.
PubMed ID
7922961 View in PubMed
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Aspects of consumer satisfaction with brief family therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247986
Source
Fam Process. 1978 Dec;17(4):399-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1978
Author
C A Woodward
J. Santa-Barbara
S. Levin
N B Epstein
Source
Fam Process. 1978 Dec;17(4):399-407
Date
Dec-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - therapy
Consumer Satisfaction
Delivery of Health Care
Family Therapy - methods
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Learning Disorders - therapy
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Psychotherapy, Brief - methods
Abstract
In an evaluative study of brief family therapy, 279 families were administered a Family Satisfaction Questionnaire in their own homes, six months after treatment terminated. This questionnaire was designed to assess several aspects of the families' satisfaction with services received. The identified patient in all families was a child with academic and/or behavioral problems at school. A variety of outcome measures were also obtained both at treatment termination and at the six-month follow-up. Families were generally satisfied with the overall services received but expressed widely varying degrees of satisfaction with various aspects of treatment. Very little dissatisfaction was expressed regarding the availability of services (less than 7 per cent), but a sizeable proportion of families (45 per cent) did not feel that the services provided were comprehensive and adequate. Despite concerns regarding comprehensiveness and adequacy of the service, the majority of families were functioning well at the time of follow-up as assessed by a number of independent measures. Global satisfaction should not be regarded as the only index of treatment effectiveness, as many families who were dissatisfied experienced successful treatment outcomes.
PubMed ID
751810 View in PubMed
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Career choices, work patterns and perceptions of undergraduate education of McMaster medical graduates: comparison between men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243104
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Jun 15;126(12):1411-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1982
Author
B M Ferrier
C A Woodward
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Jun 15;126(12):1411-4
Date
Jun-15-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Career Choice
Choice Behavior
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Physicians, Women
Professional Practice
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Perception
Abstract
A survey of the first six classes to graduate from McMaster University's medical school was carried out 5 years after graduation for the classes of 1972 to 1974 and 2 years after graduation for the classes of 1975 to 1977. Although the men and women entered similar fields of medicine the women were more likely to have taken time away from work and to be working fewer hours, and more women than men were influenced by their spouses in their career choices. More women than men expressed some dissatisfaction with the 3-year undergraduate program, and more women identified the "anxiety level created" as a weakness of the program. The women compared their preparation for the first year of postgraduate training with that of other trainees somewhat less favourably than did the men.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jun 4;94(23):1223-75939556
Cites: J Med Educ. 1968 May;43(5):532-75647096
Cites: J Med Educ. 1973 Mar;48(3):240-74686635
Cites: J Med Educ. 1973 Oct;48(10):885-954728307
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1973 Oct;130(10):1123-74728905
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Jan 11;112(1):65-7, 701109728
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Feb 22;112(4):468-9, 471, 473-41111897
Cites: Br Med J. 1976 May 15;1(6019):1191-61268621
Cites: J Med Educ. 1977 Jul;52(7):548-54874987
Cites: J Med Educ. 1977 Sep;52(9):764-6886589
Cites: J Med Educ. 1978 Nov;53(11):902-7712786
Cites: J Am Med Womens Assoc. 1979 Nov;34(11):408-15227952
Cites: J Am Med Womens Assoc. 1979 Nov;34(11):425-35227954
Cites: J Med Educ. 1980 Jan;55(1):53-47351661
PubMed ID
7083098 View in PubMed
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Career development of McMaster University medical graduates and its implications for Canadian medical manpower.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242882
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Sep 15;127(6):477-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1982
Author
C A Woodward
B M Ferrier
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Sep 15;127(6):477-80
Date
Sep-15-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Career Choice
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Male
Physicians
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
A study was undertaken of the career paths and decisions, and the factors influencing the decisions, of the first six graduating classes of McMaster University's medical school. Climate and geography, preference for urban or rural living and influence of spouse were the factors that most influenced the location of practice, although the graduates who moved to the United States considered economic factors important too. Nearly one third of the specialists were practising in the United States. Personal challenge and positive clinical experience in the field were the major influences on choice of medical field. Graduates entering a specialty were more likely than those entering primary care to consider encouragement of others, a positive example set by medical school faculty members, working hours and research experience in the field as important influences on their choice of medical field. Data are needed on the career decisions, and the factors affecting them, of the graduates of all Canadian medical schools if Canadian medical manpower planning is to be realistic.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Jan 11;112(1):65-7, 701109728
Cites: J Med Educ. 1974 Nov;49(11):1040-504444006
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Jun 15;126(12):1411-47083098
PubMed ID
7116264 View in PubMed
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Career interruptions and hours practiced: comparison between young men and women physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103448
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 Jan-Feb;81(1):16-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
C A Woodward
M L Cohen
B M Ferrier
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 Jan-Feb;81(1):16-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Career Mobility
Child Rearing
Female
Humans
Male
Marriage
Mothers
Physicians, Women
Pregnancy
Professional Practice
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
This study compares current level of workforce participation and number, type and length of career interruptions since entering medical school reported by young men and women physicians. By 10 years from medical school entry, one third of the women studied had taken a maternity/child care leave and 24% had taken time away from their careers for other reasons while only 11% of men had interrupted their careers. The average time taken and reasons given for non-maternity-related career interruption were similar for men and women. Both men and women in the types of medical careers that historically have attracted more women work shorter hours than those in medical career types where women are under-represented. Across career types, women worked shorter hours per week than men and the presence of children further reduced hours of work for women only. Although the women studied are more active professionally than previous generations during their childbearing/rearing years, a considerable gap in the participation level remains.
PubMed ID
2311044 View in PubMed
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Changes in general health and musculoskeletal outcomes in the workforce of a hospital undergoing rapid change: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195809
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2001 Jan;6(1):3-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
H S Shannon
C A Woodward
C E Cunningham
J. McIntosh
B. Lendrum
J. Brown
D. Rosenbloom
Author Affiliation
Program in Occupational Health and Environmental Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. shannonh@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2001 Jan;6(1):3-14
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Back Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Canada
Female
Hospital Restructuring - manpower
Hospitals, Teaching - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Occupational Health
Personnel, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This article aimed to examine changes in general health and time with back pain and neck pain and to identify predictors of any such changes. Hospital workers were studied longitudinally with surveys in 1995, 1996, and 1997 (N = 712). Back and neck pain were reported only at the 2nd and 3rd surveys. There was a significant decline in general health and significant increases in time with neck pain and back pain. Predictors of changes in these outcomes were mainly work-related variables (initial or change values), such as job interference with family, job influence, work psychological demands, and hours worked.
PubMed ID
11199255 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of medical students who choose primary care as a career: the McMaster experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240928
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Jan 15;130(2):129-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1984
Author
C A Woodward
R G McAuley
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Jan 15;130(2):129-31
Date
Jan-15-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Career Choice
Female
Humans
Male
Marriage
Medicine - trends
Ontario
Primary Health Care - trends
Sex Factors
Specialization
Students, Medical
Abstract
We examined the relation between demographic characteristics and the career choices of medical students who entered McMaster University medical school between 1969 and 1975. In contrast to earlier work, this study found no significant differences in sex, age, marital status at the time of entry into medical school, undergraduate major, whether prerequisite premedical courses had been taken, undergraduate grade point average and academic performance between the graduates who chose primary care and those who chose a specialty. This suggests that many medical school graduates in the 1970s entered primary care by choice rather than by default.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Apr 8;96(14):1036-96020551
Cites: Johns Hopkins Med J. 1973 Jul;133(1):19-294718018
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1974 Mar 7;290(10):545-94811101
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1974 Oct 19;111(8):813-5, 8174420690
Cites: J R Coll Physicians Lond. 1978 Jul;12(4):365-78682135
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Sep 8;121(5):621-3497953
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1956 Dec 13;255(24):1135-4013378628
PubMed ID
6692191 View in PubMed
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Clinical practice guidelines. New-to-practice family physicians' attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212570
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1996 Mar;42:463-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
B M Ferrier
C A Woodward
M. Cohen
A P Williams
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1996 Mar;42:463-8
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cohort Studies
Family Practice
Female
Group Practice
Humans
Internal Medicine
Male
Ontario
Physicians, Family - psychology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Private Practice
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
To examine the attitudes toward clinical practice guidelines of a group of family physicians who had recently entered practice in Ontario, and to compare them with the attitudes of a group of internists from the United States.
Mailed questionnaire survey of all members of a defined cohort.
Ontario family practices.
Certificants of the College of Family Physicians of Canada who received certification in 1989, 1990, and 1991 and who were practising in Ontario. Of 564-cohort members, 395 (70%) responded. Men (184) and women (211) responded at the same rate.
Levels of agreement with 10 descriptive statements about practice guidelines and analyses of variance of these responses for several physician characteristics.
Of respondents in independent practice, 80% were in group practice. Women were more likely to have chosen group practice, in which they were more likely to use practice guidelines than men. Generally favourable attitudes toward guidelines were observed. Physician characteristics occasionally influenced agreement with the descriptors. The pattern of agreement was similar to that noted in the study of American internists, but, in general, Ontario physicians were more supportive.
This group of relatively new-to-practice Ontario family physicians shows little resistance to guidelines and appears to read less threat of external control in them than does the US group.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1989 Nov 9;321(19):1306-112677732
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1990;31(12):1327-362126894
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1994 Jun 1;120(11):956-638172440
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Feb 1;148(3):385-98439909
Cites: Med Care. 1994 Mar;32(3):202-138145598
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1991;12:41-652049143
PubMed ID
8616286 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1997 Sep;43:1541-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
C A Woodward
A P Williams
M. Cohen
B. Ferrier
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1997 Sep;43:1541-7
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Certification
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Practice - organization & administration
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Ontario
Patient Admission
Physician's Practice Patterns - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Workload
Abstract
To determine the proportion of recently certificated Ontario family physicians who have closed their practices to new patients or restricted their services.
Cross-sectional survey mailed between September 1993 and January 1994.
Ontario family practices.
All family medicine residency-trained certificants of the College of Family Physicians of Canada from 1989 to 1991 currently practising in Ontario. Response rate was 70% (395 of 564 eligible physicians). Otherwise eligible physicians practising as locums, emergency room physicians, or military physicians were excluded.
Self-report of practices being closed to new patients and of various restrictions placed on practices.
Nearly one third of respondents had closed their practices to new patients. Although the decision to close a practice correlated with length of time in practice, physicians in metropolitan Toronto were significantly less likely to report closed practices than physicians practising in other regions of Ontario. Restrictions reported related to patients and problems, geographic area, and type of setting(s) serviced. About 45% of respondents did not provide one or more of a defined set of five services.
Results of this study suggest that family physicians restrict their practices in various ways within the first 5 years after certification.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1985 May 15;132(10):1175-9, 1182-83995440
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Oct 1;149(7):977-848402426
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1990 Jan-Feb;81(1):16-202311044
Cites: CMAJ. 1989 Jan 15;140(2):212-212910406
PubMed ID
9303233 View in PubMed
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Cohort, gender and practice organization: examining the bounds of collaborative medicine among newly established female and male family physicians in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208716
Source
Health Serv Manage Res. 1997 May;10(2):121-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
A P Williams
C A Woodward
B. Ferrier
M. Cohen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Administration, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Health Serv Manage Res. 1997 May;10(2):121-31
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cohort Studies
Family Practice - organization & administration
Female
Group Practice - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Ontario
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Workload
Abstract
This paper analyzes data from a 1993 survey of 395 newly established female and male family physicians in Ontario, Canada, to examine the relationship between practice organization and gender. Previous research suggests that younger physicians, particularly women, tend to enter group practice. Compared to solo practice, groups may offer more predictable incomes, more manageable workloads, peer collaboration and review, and economies of scale. Further, female physicians in groups may develop distinctive styles of collaborative medicine. The results show that a majority of physicians in our cohort are in private community-based group practice. However, while many groups share premises, staff and expenses, and many have common charts and practice guidelines, only a minority incorporate regular meetings to discuss business or patient care, have shared care of hospitalized patients, or audits of physicians' practices. Few gender differences are observed in private group practice: although women physicians attract larger proportions of female patients than do their male colleagues, women and men organize their groups in similar ways and have similarity strong patient-centered attitudes.
PubMed ID
10168961 View in PubMed
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39 records – page 1 of 4.