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A preventive pilot project addressing multiethnic tensions in the wake of the Iraq war.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172180
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2005 Oct;75(4):466-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Cécile Rousseau
Anousheh Machouf
Author Affiliation
Transcultural Psychiatry Team, Montreal Children's Hospital, Montreal, PQ, Canada. cecile.rousseau@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2005 Oct;75(4):466-74
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Anxiety - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Child
Cultural Diversity
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Male
Pilot Projects
Prejudice
Psychosocial Deprivation
Quebec
Schools
Social Environment
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Terrorism - prevention & control - psychology
War
Abstract
This article describes a school-based preventive pilot project for recent immigrant children, designed to decrease anxiety and intergroup tensions associated with the Iraq war. Results suggest that clinicians should address the multiplicity of meanings associated with international events when planning a prevention program in multiethnic schools to help children to cope with the increasingly common gap between the ways traumatic events covered by the media are understood at home and at school.
PubMed ID
16262506 View in PubMed
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"Look me in the eye": empathy and the transmission of trauma in the refugee determination process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143215
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2010 Feb;47(1):70-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Cécile Rousseau
Patricia Foxen
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. cecile.rousseau@mcgill.ca
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2010 Feb;47(1):70-92
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Altruism
Consumer Advocacy
Cooperative Behavior
Empathy
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interview, Psychological
Machiavellianism
Moral Obligations
Narration
Politics
Power (Psychology)
Prejudice
Quebec
Refugees - psychology
Social Justice
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - psychology
Abstract
Debates between refugee advocates, institutional actors and the wider public regarding refugee claimants often evoke anger, fear and sadness, as well as more positive emotions such as compassion, suggesting a complex societal emotional response toward refugee stories. This article analyses the emotional interactions surrounding refugee determination hearings, as reflected in the discourse of administrative judges and refugees. Our results show that the concepts of empathy and compassion are often used by judges to confirm the benevolent image that the administrative tribunal wants to project as a representative body of the host country. However, the very unequal power relations of the hearing setting structure the transmission of the refugee stories in a way that often prevents an emotional encounter between decision makers and refugees. Beyond the specific context of the refugee determination process, these results illustrate how prevalent psychological models of empathy and the transmission of trauma implicitly reveal a political dimension that validates representations of the helpless but potentially dangerous Other, representations that often underlie broader north-south power relations.
PubMed ID
20511253 View in PubMed
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A diversity of voices: the McGill 'Working with Culture' seminars.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115037
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2013 Jun;37(2):347-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jaswant Guzder
Cécile Rousseau
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. jaswant.guzder@mcgill.ca
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2013 Jun;37(2):347-64
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cultural Competency - education
Curriculum
Group Processes
Humans
Mental health services
Narrative Therapy
Prejudice - psychology
Psychotherapy - education
Teaching - methods
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Abstract
The Working with Culture seminar is offered as a course during the month long Annual McGill Summer Program for Social and Transcultural Psychiatry, attended by local and international participants each May since 1994. The article outlines some of the premises and pedagogical approaches of this clinically oriented biweekly seminar series with discussions and didactic teaching on cultural dimensions of mental health care. The course readings, seminar topics and invited speakers focus mainly on therapist client encounters constructed by the multiple voices with dimensions of psychiatric, social, historical, legal, ethical, political, systemic and intra-psychic domains. The dual leadership emphasizes the gaps and complementarity amongst voices, and it invites and supports a destabilizing decentering process and the creation of solidarities amongst participants. Applying a bio-psychosocial case study method, each 3-h seminar engages the participants in a critical dialogue on apprehending the enmeshment of social suffering with psychiatric disorders whilst examining the usefulness and the limits of cultural formulation models. The seminar working group and teaching approach acknowledges cultural hybridity as a dynamic process marked by continuous therapist attunement to uncertainty or 'not knowing' which implies a dethroning of an expert position.
Notes
Comment In: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2013 Jun;37(2):390-723564248
PubMed ID
23549711 View in PubMed
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Muslim families' understanding of, and reaction to, 'the war on terror'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140037
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2010 Oct;80(4):601-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Cecile Rousseau
Uzma Jamil
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. cecile.rousseau@mcgill.ca
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2010 Oct;80(4):601-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Child
Communication
Disasters
Empathy
Family - psychology
Humans
India - ethnology
Interviews as Topic
Islam - psychology
Middle Aged
Pakistan - ethnology
Politics
Quebec
Social Identification
Terrorism - psychology
War
Young Adult
Abstract
In multiethnic societies, the consequences of the war on terror (WOT) for Muslim youth are still not well understood and the school's role remains to be defined. This article documents the parent-child transmission of understanding and emotional reaction to the WOT in South Asian Muslim families in Montreal, Canada. For this qualitative study, the researchers interviewed 20 families. Results indicated that the families' emotional reactions and communication about these events were interlinked with family patterns of identity assignation. The majority of parents avoided talking with their children about the WOT and felt that these issues should not be discussed at school. Most children shared their parents' feelings of helplessness and familial patterns of identity assignation. Parents reporting a greater sense of agency displayed less avoidance, had a more complex vision of self and other, and favored the school's role in helping children make sense of these events. These results suggest that school interventions in neighborhoods strained by international tensions should emphasize immigrant parents' empowerment and provide spaces where their children feel comfortable expressing their concerns.
PubMed ID
20950301 View in PubMed
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North African and Latin American parents' and adolescents' perceptions of physical discipline and physical abuse: when dysnormativity begets exclusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153390
Source
Child Welfare. 2009;88(6):5-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Ghayda Hassan
Cécile Rousseau
Author Affiliation
University of Québec at Montreal, Department of Psychology, Quebec. hassan.ghadya@uqam.ca
Source
Child Welfare. 2009;88(6):5-22
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Africa, Northern - ethnology
Arabs
Attitude - ethnology
Child
Child Abuse - ethnology
Christianity
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Islam
Latin America - ethnology
Male
Parenting - ethnology
Punishment
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Social Values - ethnology
Abstract
This research documents the cultural norms around physical discipline and physical abuse among immigrant parents and youth, and assesses the impact that perceived divergences in these norms have on the relation between the family and the outer social world. Interviews were conducted with 10 parents and 10 adolescents from North African Arab countries, and 10 parents and 10 adolescents from Latin America living in Canada. Results highlight that divergent discipline practices were perceived by participants as an important source of tension when they were accompanied with a demeaning image, projected by the host society onto the immigrant family.
PubMed ID
20695289 View in PubMed
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Psychiatric symptoms associated with brief detention of adult asylum seekers in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108583
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Jul;58(7):409-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Janet Cleveland
Cécile Rousseau
Author Affiliation
Centre de santé et de services sociaux de la Montagne and Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. janet.cleveland@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Jul;58(7):409-16
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - etiology
Canada
Depression - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Refugees - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Regression Analysis
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine the association between brief detention and psychiatric symptom levels among adult asylum seekers.
The Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist-25 were used to assess psychiatric symptoms and premigration trauma exposure in 122 detained and 66 nondetained adult asylum seekers in Montreal and Toronto.
After a mean detention of 31 days, the proportion of asylum seekers scoring above clinical cutpoints was significantly higher in the detained than the nondetained group for posttraumatic stress (?² = 4.117, df = 1, P = 0.04), depression (?² = 13.813, df = 1, P
PubMed ID
23870723 View in PubMed
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Premigration exposure to political violence among independent immigrants and its association with emotional distress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177065
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2004 Dec;192(12):852-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Cécile Rousseau
Aline Drapeau
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2004 Dec;192(12):852-6
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arabs - psychology - statistics & numerical data
China - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Haiti - ethnology
Hispanic Americans - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Latin America - ethnology
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Politics
Quebec - epidemiology
Refugees - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although the distinction between independent immigrants and refugees has an impact on policy, services, and public opinion because it implies differences in resettlement needs, few recent studies have documented the validity of this assumption. In this population-based survey of recent migrants in Quebec (N = 1871), immigration status (refugee, independent, or sponsored immigrant) is examined in relation to premigration exposure to political violence and refugees' emotional distress, assessed with the SCL-25. A higher percentage of refugees reported exposure to political violence in their homeland, but the percentages of exposed independent (48%) and sponsored (42%) immigrants were unexpectedly high. Emotional distress was significantly higher among Chinese respondents who had witnessed acts of violence and in subjects from Arab countries who reported persecution. These results suggest that service providers and policy makers should not assume that independent immigrants have not been exposed to political violence before their migration.
PubMed ID
15583507 View in PubMed
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Ethnic and religious discrimination: the multifaceted role of religiosity and collective self-esteem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108478
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2013 Aug;50(4):475-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Ghayda Hassan
Cécile Rousseau
Nicolas Moreau
Author Affiliation
University of Quebec at Montreal.
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2013 Aug;50(4):475-92
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Arabs - ethnology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Haiti - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice - psychology
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Religion
Self Concept
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study analyses the roles of collective self-esteem and religiosity in the relationship between discrimination and psychological distress among a sample of 432 recent immigrants from Haiti and Arab countries living in Montreal, Quebec. Collective self-esteem (CSE), religiosity, discriminatory experiences, and psychological symptoms of depression and anxiety were assessed. Regression analyses revealed direct negative effects of discrimination, CSE, and religiosity on psychological distress for the entire sample. CSE, however, also appeared to moderate the effects of discrimination on psychological distress. Participants with higher CSE reported lower levels of anxiety and depression as a result of discrimination compared to those who expressed lower CSE levels. The results suggest that the relationship between CSE, discrimination, and psychological distress must be reexamined in light of recent sociopolitical changes and the upsurge in ethnic and religious tensions following the war on terror.
PubMed ID
23883587 View in PubMed
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Perception that "everything requires a lot of effort": transcultural SCL-25 item validation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148554
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2009 Sep;197(9):695-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Nicolas Moreau
Ghayda Hassan
Cécile Rousseau
Khalid Chenguiti
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Nicolas.Moreau.dlm@uOttawa.ca
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2009 Sep;197(9):695-9
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arabs - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Cluster analysis
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depression - diagnosis
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Haiti - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - psychology
Abstract
This brief report illustrates how the migration context can affect specific item validity of mental health measures. The SCL-25 was administered to 432 recently settled immigrants (220 Haitian and 212 Arabs). We performed descriptive analyses, as well as Infit and Outfit statistics analyses using WINSTEPS Rasch Measurement Software based on Item Response Theory. The participants' comments about the item You feel everything requires a lot of effort in the SCL-25 were also qualitatively analyzed. Results revealed that the item You feel everything requires a lot of effort is an outlier and does not adjust in an expected and valid fashion with its cluster items, as it is over-endorsed by Haitian and Arab healthy participants. Our study thus shows that, in transcultural mental health research, the cultural and migratory contexts may interact and significantly influence the meaning of some symptom items and consequently, the validity of symptom scales.
PubMed ID
19752650 View in PubMed
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[Preliminary qualitative evaluation of a shared-care mental health programme with youths in Montréal: facing institutional and cultural uncertainty].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150727
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(1):127-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Lucie Nadeau
Cécile Rousseau
Yves Séguin
Nicolas Moreau
Author Affiliation
Pédopsychiatre, Centre Universitaire de Santé McGill; CSSS de la Montagne; Hôpital Général Juif.
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(1):127-42
Date
2009
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Cultural Diversity
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Quebec
Abstract
This article describes a collaborative mental health care project for youths, implemented in Montreal in a multiethnic setting. The authors examine the adjustments needed in the shared-care model to address the complexity of cultural and cooperation issues raised in the provision of services to a multiethnic population. A preliminary qualitative evaluation of the project shows how first-line workers face many uncertainties, stemming from both the institutional context and the multicultural reality of the population served. Results from this study advance the hypothesis that although uncertainties may generate discomfort and confusion, they may also open a space for innovation and acceptance of otherness.
PubMed ID
19475197 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.