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27 records – page 1 of 3.

Absence of cardiovascular benefits and sportfish consumption among St. Lawrence River anglers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182864
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Catherine Godin
Bryna Shatenstein
Gilles Paradis
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine Sociale et préventive, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. catherine.godin@bigfoot.com
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Dietary Fats
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - pharmacology
Fisheries
Fishes
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
The benefits of sportfish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid (omega3-FA) intake for cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated in a sample of 112 male fishers from the St. Lawrence River in the Montreal area during the 1996 winter and fall fishing seasons. A questionnaire on fishing practices and fish consumption was administered, and fasting blood samples were collected for lipid and phospholipid determination. Linear regression analyses, which considered the confounding effect of major risk factors, did not show any significant association between measured omega3-FAs or reported fish intake and blood lipids or blood pressure. This study is limited by its low statistical power due to the small sample size and the possibility that the fish eaten by the participants were low in omega3-FAs or that the participants diets contained foods high in cholesterol-raising fat.
PubMed ID
14615233 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant-rich food intakes and their association with blood total antioxidant status and vitamin C and E levels in community-dwelling seniors from the Quebec longitudinal study NuAge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137105
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2011 Jun;46(6):475-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Abdelouahed Khalil
Pierrette Gaudreau
Mounia Cherki
Richard Wagner
Daniel M Tessier
Tamas Fulop
Bryna Shatenstein
Author Affiliation
Research Centre on Aging, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada. abdelouahed.khalil@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2011 Jun;46(6):475-81
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - metabolism
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - metabolism
Ascorbic Acid - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Quebec
Reactive Oxygen Species - metabolism
Vitamin E - blood
Abstract
A cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the association between current consumption of a series of 26 common antioxidant-rich foods (ARF) with serum total antioxidant status (TAS) and plasma vitamin C and E levels in community-dwelling older adults. A convenience sample of the first 94 non-smoking Caucasian men (54%) and women (46%) enrolled in the Quebec Longitudinal Study NuAge were selected. The "Functional Foods Consumption Frequency Questionnaire" (FFCFQ) was administered at recruitment (T1) to ascertain patterns of consumption of ARF over the lifetime. The total Oxygen Radical Antioxidant Capacity (ORAC) of 25 ARF reported by subjects was estimated using published values. Serum TAS was determined based on the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay while plasma vitamins C and E (a- and ?-tocopherol) levels were analyzed by HPLC. The numbers of ARF eaten daily at T1, estimated from the FFCFQ and calculated from the diet recalls, were significantly correlated (r=0.51, P
PubMed ID
21316439 View in PubMed
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Associations between residential food environment and dietary patterns in urban-dwelling older adults: results from the VoisiNuAge study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122667
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Nov;15(11):2026-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Geneviève Mercille
Lucie Richard
Lise Gauvin
Yan Kestens
Bryna Shatenstein
Mark Daniel
Hélène Payette
Author Affiliation
Institut de recherche en santé publique de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. genevieve.mercille.1@umontreal.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Nov;15(11):2026-39
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Commerce
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Environment
Fast Foods
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Questionnaires
Restaurants
Urban Population
Abstract
To examine associations between the availability of residential-area food sources and dietary patterns among seniors.
Cross-sectional analyses. Individual-level data from the NuAge study on nutrition and healthy ageing were merged with geographic information system data on food store availability and area-level social composition. Two dietary patterns reflecting lower- and higher-quality diets (respectively designated 'western' and 'prudent') were identified from FFQ data. Two food source relative availability measures were calculated for a 500 m road-network buffer around participants' homes: (i) proportion of fast-food outlets (%FFO) relative to all restaurants and (ii) proportion of stores potentially selling healthful foods (%HFS, healthful food stores) relative to all food stores. Associations between dietary patterns and food source exposure were tested in linear regression models accounting for individual (health and sociodemographic) and area-level (socio-economic and ethnicity) covariates.
Montréal metropolitan area, Canada.
Urban-dwelling older adults (n 751), aged 68 to 84 years.
%FFO was inversely associated with prudent diet (ß = -0·105; P
PubMed ID
22789436 View in PubMed
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Determinants of healthy eating in community-dwelling elderly people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173665
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jul-Aug;96 Suppl 3:S27-31, S30-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hélène Payette
Bryna Shatenstein
Author Affiliation
Research Centre on Aging, Sherbrooke Geriatric University Institute, Sherbrooke. helene.payette@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jul-Aug;96 Suppl 3:S27-31, S30-5
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Canada
Female
Food Habits
Geriatrics
Health status
Humans
Male
Nutritional Requirements
Social Class
Abstract
Among seniors, food choice and related activities are affected by health status, biological changes wrought by aging and functional abilities, which are mediated in the larger arena by familial, social and economic factors. Determinants of healthy eating stem from individual and collective factors. Individual components include age, sex, education, physiological and health issues, psychological attributes, lifestyle practices, and knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviours, in addition to other universal dietary determinants such as income, social status and culture. Collective determinants of healthy eating, such as accessible food labels, an appropriate food shopping environment, the marketing of the "healthy eating" message, adequate social support and provision of effective, community-based meal delivery services have the potential to mediate dietary habits and thus foster healthy eating. However, there is a startling paucity of research in this area, and this is particularly so in Canada. Using search and inclusion criteria and key search strings to guide the research, this article outlines the state of knowledge and research gaps in the area of determinants of healthy eating among Canadian seniors. In conclusion, dietary self-management persists in well, independent seniors without financial constraints, whatever their living arrangements, whereas nutritional risk is high among those in poor health and lacking in resources. Further study is necessary to clarify contributors to healthy eating in order to permit the development and evaluation of programs and services designed to encourage and facilitate healthy eating in older Canadians.
PubMed ID
16042161 View in PubMed
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Development and validation of a food frequency questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174188
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(2):67-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Bryna Shatenstein
Sylvie Nadon
Catherine Godin
Guylaine Ferland
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche, Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Département de nutrition, Université de Montréal, PQ.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(2):67-75
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Quebec
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Regular diet monitoring requires a tool validated in the target population. A 73-item, semiquantitative, self-administered food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), was adapted in French and English from the Block National Cancer Institute Health Habits and History Questionnaire. The FFQ was used to capture usual long-term food consumption among adults living in Quebec. A representative sample of adults aged 18 to 82 (57% female) was recruited by random digit dialling in the Montreal region. Approximately 64% of recruits completed and returned the instrument by mail (n=248). The FFQ was validated in a subsample (n=94, 61% female) using four nonconsecutive food records (FRs). Median energy intakes (in kcal) for men and women, respectively, were FFQ (total sample) 2,112 and 1,823, FFQ (subsample) 2,137 and 1,752, and FR (subsample) 2,510 and 1,830. Spearman correlation analyses between FFQ and FR nutrients were positive (with r ranging from 0.32 for folate to 0.58 for saturated fatty acids) and statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
15975195 View in PubMed
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Diet and prostate cancer risk with specific focus on dairy products and dietary calcium: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144847
Source
Prostate. 2010 Jul 1;70(10):1054-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2010
Author
Sara Raimondi
Jihène Ben Mabrouk
Bryna Shatenstein
Patrick Maisonneuve
Parviz Ghadirian
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.
Source
Prostate. 2010 Jul 1;70(10):1054-65
Date
Jul-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Case-Control Studies
Dairy Products
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite the prevalence of prostate cancer worldwide, only a few risk factors have been well-established. The role of diet, especially of dairy products, in the etiology of prostate cancer is still controversial.
This study assessed the association of dietary components, particularly dairy products and dietary calcium, on prostate cancer risk in a case-control study of 197 cases and an equal number of individually matched controls recruited in Montreal, Canada. A semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire was administered in which the usual consumption frequency and amounts consumed of more than 200 food items were recorded.
We found a twofold increased risk of prostate cancer associated with an increased intake of dairy products {Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.19; 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) 1.22-3.94}. A significant trend of decreasing prostate cancer risk with higher intake was found for legumes, nuts, finfish/shellfish and for alpha-tocopherol after adjustment for calcium intake. Milk was the only dairy product significantly associated with prostate cancer risk, with OR = 2.27; 95% CI (1.25-4.09) for the highest versus lowest quartiles of consumption. Calcium, the main micronutrient contained in dairy products, showed only a borderline association with prostate cancer risk (P = 0.09), with slightly higher risk for higher calcium intake. In conclusion, this study supports the hypothesis that dairy products, especially milk, are involved in the etiology of prostate cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the various nutrients in dairy products and total diet may interact to influence this risk remain unknown.
PubMed ID
20232354 View in PubMed
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Dietary resilience as described by older community-dwelling adults from the NuAge study "if there is a will -there is a way!".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128482
Source
Appetite. 2012 Apr;58(2):730-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Elisabeth Vesnaver
Heather H Keller
Hélène Payette
Bryna Shatenstein
Author Affiliation
University of Guelph, Department of Family Relations and Applied Human Nutrition, Macdonald Institute, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appetite. 2012 Apr;58(2):730-8
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Diet
Eating - physiology
Female
Food - economics
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Quebec
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Many older adults experience age-related changes that can have negative consequences for food intake. Some older adults continue to eat well despite these challenges showing dietary resilience. We aimed to describe the strategies used by older adults to overcome dietary obstacles and to explore the key themes of dietary resilience. The sample was drawn from the five-year Québec Longitudinal Study "NuAge". It included 30 participants (80% female) aged 73-87 years; 10 with decreased diet quality and 20 with steady or increased diet quality; all had faced key barriers to eating well. Semi-structured interviews explored how age-related changes affected participants' experiences with eating. Thematic analysis revealed strategies used to overcome eating, shopping, and meal preparation difficulties. Key themes of dietary resilience were: prioritizing eating well, doing whatever it takes to keep eating well, being able to do it yourself, getting help when you need it. Implications for health professionals are discussed.
PubMed ID
22200412 View in PubMed
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Dietary risk factors for testicular carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184087
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Oct 10;106(6):934-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-2003
Author
Michael J Garner
Nicholas J Birkett
Kenneth C Johnson
Bryna Shatenstein
Parviz Ghadirian
Daniel Krewski
Author Affiliation
R. Samuel McLaughlin Center for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada. mgarner@uottawa.ca
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Oct 10;106(6):934-41
Date
Oct-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Education
Energy intake
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Smoking
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Although testicular cancer is a relatively rare lesion, accounting for only 1.1% of all malignant neoplasms in males in Canada, it is the most common cancer among Canadian men 20-45 years of age. Knowledge of the causes of testicular cancer risk in general, and more specifically, its association with diet, remain limited. Data from 601 cases of testicular cancer and 744 population-based controls collected in 8 of the 10 Canadian provinces between 1994-97 were used to explore the relationship between diet and testicular cancer risk. We systematically examined 17 food groups, 15 nutrients and 4 individual foods based on data collected through a 69-item food-frequency questionnaire. Our results suggest that high dairy product intake, in particular high intake of cheese (odds ratio [OR] = 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-2.86; p-trend
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Cancer. 2003 Dec 20;107(6):1059
PubMed ID
12918073 View in PubMed
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Dietary transition stages based on eating patterns and diet quality among Haitians of Montreal, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164267
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 May;10(5):454-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Marie-Claude Désilets
Michèle Rivard
Bryna Shatenstein
Hélène Delisle
Author Affiliation
Département de Nutrition, Université de Montréal, CP 6128 succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec, Canada, H3C 1J7.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 May;10(5):454-63
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards - trends
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits
Haiti - ethnology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To identify dietary transition stages based on dietary patterns of adult Haitians having lived in Montreal for various lengths of time, and to assess associated dietary quality.
One hundred and eighty-one Haitians aged 25-60 years were recruited by the modified random digit dialling method.
Socio-economic, diet and lifestyle variables were documented by questionnaire. Three non-consecutive 24-hour dietary recalls were conducted over a 3-month period. Dietary patterns were studied using cluster analysis, and their association with proportion of lifetime in Canada and with socio-economic status (SES) was examined. Diet quality criteria were micronutrient adequacy and healthfulness based on dietary recommendations of the World Health Organization.
Four dietary phenotypes were identified which could roughly represent stages of dietary transition or acculturation (Traditional, Pre-Western, Western and Modern). Subjects in the 'Traditional' cluster were older and had lived for a significantly lower proportion of their lifetime in Canada; they also tended to be of lower SES. Diet quality was significantly higher in the 'Traditional' than the 'Western' type, particularly with respect to healthfulness. A significantly lower proportion of subjects complying with limited intake of total fat (
PubMed ID
17411465 View in PubMed
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Diet quality among older Quebecers as assessed by simple indicators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182389
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2003;64(4):174-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Bryna Shatenstein
Sylvie Nadon
Guylaine Ferland
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche, Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, and Département de nutrition, Université de Montréal, QC.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2003;64(4):174-80
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
Eating
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Sciences - education
Quebec
Abstract
To determine whether older Quebecers are eating adequately and whether summary scores represent diet quality, a representative subset of participants aged 55 to 74 (weighted n=460, 47% male) was studied from the 1990 Enquête québécoise sur la nutrition dataset. Participants' diet quality was scored from adjusted 24-hour recalls. Foods were coded into Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating food groups. Usual Dietary Adequacy Score (maximum=18) and Dietary Diversity Score (maximum=4) were calculated from adjusted food guide portions and validated internally in relation to achievement of nutrient recommendations using correlation analysis. Average usual Dietary Adequacy Score (mean +/- standard error) was 14.96 +/- 0.15 (men) and 13.72 +/- 0.15 (women). Only 7% of men and 1% of women achieved the maximum usual score. Forty-four percent of men and 45% of women scored a usual Dietary Diversity Score of 3, and 55% of men and 50% of women achieved 4. Thus, approximately half of older Quebecers showed inadequate dietary variety, and consumed fewer than the minimum recommended number of servings from certain food groups. Summary diet quality indicators are useful for tracking diet quality, and provide critical data for planning nutrition education programs targeting older persons.
PubMed ID
14675498 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.