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Source
CMAJ. 2006 Mar 28;174(7):975; author reply 975-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-28-2006
Author
Bryce Kiberd
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Mar 28;174(7):975; author reply 975-6
Date
Mar-28-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Colonoscopy - economics
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mass Screening - economics
Reproducibility of Results
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Jul 24;165(2):206-811501466
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Oct 11;173(8):877-8116217110
Comment On: CMAJ. 2005 Oct 11;173(8):877-8116217110
PubMed ID
16567760 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of organ donation: evaluating investment into donor action and other donor initiatives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181083
Source
Am J Transplant. 2004 Apr;4(4):569-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
James F Whiting
Bryce Kiberd
Zoltan Kalo
Paul Keown
Leo Roels
Maria Kjerulf
Author Affiliation
Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME, USA. whitij@mmc.org
Source
Am J Transplant. 2004 Apr;4(4):569-73
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Costs
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - economics - methods
Markov Chains
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Tissue and Organ Procurement - economics - methods
Abstract
Initiatives aimed at increasing organ donation can be considered health care interventions, and will compete with other health care interventions for limited resources. We have developed a model capable of calculating the cost-utility of organ donor initiatives and applied it to Donor Action, a successful international program designed to optimize donor practices. The perspective of the payer in the Canadian health care system was chosen. A Markov model was developed to estimate the net present value incremental lifetime direct medical costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) as a consequence of increased kidney transplantation rates. Cost-saving and cost-effectiveness thresholds were calculated. The effects of changing the success rate and time frame of the intervention was examined as a sensitivity analysis. Transplantation results in a gain of 1.99 QALYs and a cost savings of Can$104,000 over the 20-year time frame compared with waiting on dialysis. Implementation of an intervention such as Donor Action, which produced as few as three extra donors per million population, would be cost-effective at a cost of Can$1.0 million per million population. The cost-effectiveness of Donor Action and other organ donor initiatives compare favorably to other health care interventions. Organ donation may be underfunded in North America.
PubMed ID
15023149 View in PubMed
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Population pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid during the first week after renal transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173599
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Aug;61(7):507-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Christine E Staatz
Stephen B Duffull
Bryce Kiberd
Albert D Fraser
Susan E Tett
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, 4072, Australia. chris@pharmacy.uq.edu.au
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Aug;61(7):507-16
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - pharmacokinetics
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Mycophenolic Acid - pharmacokinetics
Nova Scotia
Population Surveillance
Abstract
To investigate the population pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in adult kidney transplant recipients during the crucial first week after transplantation.
Data were collected from 117 patients. MPA plasma concentrations were determined at t=0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after mycophenolate mofetil dosing on days 3, 5 and 7. Population analysis was performed using NONMEM. Covariates screened were sex, age, body weight, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, serum albumin, days of therapy, diabetes mellitus, organ source (live or cadaveric) and co-therapy (tacrolimus or cyclosporine). Final model validity was evaluated using 200 boot strapped samples from the original data. Bias and precision were determined through comparison of observed and predicted concentrations.
Individual concentration-time profiles showed evidence of an absorption lag time and enterohepatic recirculation of MPA in some patients on some occasions. The best base model had bi-exponential elimination with a typical population (SE%) apparent clearance (CL/F) of 29 l/h (5%) and apparent volume of the central compartment of 65 l (7%). CL/F decreased significantly with increasing serum albumin (1.42 l/h reduction in total plasma CL/F with each 1 g/l increase in albumin) and was 27% greater in patients receiving cyclosporine than in those receiving tacrolimus. Evaluation of the final model showed close agreement between pairs of boot strapped and final model parameter estimates (all differences
PubMed ID
16049701 View in PubMed
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