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Antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes in Denmark 1958-2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176428
Source
APMIS. 2005 Jan;113(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Joanna M Hansen
Peter Gerner-Smidt
Brita Bruun
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Hillerød Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark. jmh07@dadlnet.dk
Source
APMIS. 2005 Jan;113(1):31-6
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Evolution
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - drug effects
Listeriosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In order to see whether the susceptibility of Danish Listeria monocytogenes strains has changed over the years we examined a collection of human isolates from the period 1958-2001. We, furthermore, wanted to compare L. monocytogenes susceptibility testing using a disc diffusion assay with MIC measurements performed by the E-test. 106 strains isolated predominantly from blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluids were examined together with three reference strains. Susceptibility to the following antibiotics was tested by the E-test and by Oxoid discs using Iso-sensitest agar: penicillin G, ampicillin, meropenem, gentamicin, sulphamethoxazole, trimethoprim, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The strains were in the main sensitive to all antibiotics examined using both methods, except for ciprofloxacin, where the strains were intermediate sensitive. However, for penicillin, ampicillin and sulphamethoxazole, while the disc diffusion assay found the strains to be sensitive, MIC measurements generally placed the strains one dilution above the breakpoint for sensitivity in the intermediate sensitive group. Based on the MIC measurements, the antibiotic susceptibility of L. monocytogenes has not changed in Denmark from 1958 to 2001, and the multiresistant strains found in human infections elsewhere have not been found in Denmark.
PubMed ID
15676012 View in PubMed
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Brucellosis in immigrants in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63625
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(7):540-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Nanna Eriksen
Lars Lemming
Niels Højlyng
Brita Bruun
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Roskilde Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(7):540-2
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous
Adult
Brucella abortus - isolation & purification
Brucellosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Communication Barriers
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Abstract
Brucellosis is a rarely encountered infection in northern Europe. We report 4 cases of Brucella abortus bacteremia occurring in Denmark during 1999-2000. The clinical presentation was characteristically vague and brucellosis was not suspected by the attending physicians, partly because incomplete patient histories were obtained as a result of language barriers. The diagnosis was finally established by means of blood cultures, which were performed because of fever of unknown origin.
PubMed ID
12195884 View in PubMed
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Clonal relationship of recent invasive Haemophilus influenzae serotype f isolates from Denmark and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13780
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2004 Nov;53(Pt 11):1161-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Brita Bruun
Bente Gahrn-Hansen
Henrik Westh
Mogens Kilian
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK 2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark.
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2004 Nov;53(Pt 11):1161-5
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters - genetics
Aged
Bacteremia - microbiology
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Cholangitis - microbiology
DNA, Bacterial - genetics - isolation & purification
Denmark
Enzymes - analysis
Epidemiology, Molecular
Epiglottitis - microbiology
Female
Haemophilus Infections - microbiology
Haemophilus influenzae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Humans
Liver Abscess - microbiology
Male
Meningitis, Haemophilus - microbiology
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polysaccharides - genetics
Respiratory Tract Infections - microbiology
Serotyping
United States
Abstract
Surveillance performed after the introduction of general Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) vaccination in Denmark identified 13 cases of invasive bacteraemic H. influenzae serotype f (Hif) disease in adults over a period of 7 years. Bacteraemic respiratory tract infections accounted for 61 % of cases, but meningitis, epiglottitis and osteoarthritis were also seen. Recent Danish isolates were compared to recent American isolates, historical Hif strains and non-Hif invasive strains. Results of conventional serotyping were confirmed by PCR detection of the serotype-f-specific cap and bexA gene sequences. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis typing revealed that recent Danish and American isolates belonged to a single Hif clone, which may be undergoing expansion. The need for accurate serotyping of H. influenzae to enable reliable monitoring for Hib replacement by other capsular types is emphasized.
PubMed ID
15496397 View in PubMed
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Molecular screening for Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis among Danish Candida parapsilosis group blood culture isolates: proposal of a new RFLP profile for differentiation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98433
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2010 Apr;59(Pt 4):414-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Hossein Mirhendi
Brita Bruun
Henrik Carl Schønheyder
Jens Jørgen Christensen
Kurt Fuursted
Bente Gahrn-Hansen
Helle Krogh Johansen
Lene Nielsen
Jenny Dahl Knudsen
Maiken Cavling Arendrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Mycology and Parasitology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2010 Apr;59(Pt 4):414-20
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Oxidoreductases - genetics
Candida - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Candidiasis - diagnosis - microbiology
Fungemia - microbiology
Humans
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Abstract
Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis are recently described species phenotypically indistinguishable from Candida parapsilosis . We evaluated phenotyping and molecular methods for the detection of these species among 79 unique blood culture isolates of the C. parapsilosis group obtained during the years 2004-2008. The isolates were screened by PCR amplification of the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-encoding gene ( SADH) followed by digestion with the restriction enzyme Ban I, using C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019, C. orthopsilosis ATCC 96139 and C. metapsilosis ATCC 96144 as controls. Isolates with RFLP patterns distinct from C. parapsilosis were characterized by sequence analysis of the ITS1-ITS2, 26S rRNA (D1/D2) and SADH regions. Restriction patterns for the 3 species with each of 610 restriction enzymes were predicted in silico using 12 available sequences. By PCR-RFLP of the SADH gene alone, four isolates (5.1 %) had a pattern identical to the C. orthopsilosis reference strain. Sequence analysis of SADH and ITS (internal transcribed spacer) regions identified two of these isolates as C. metapsilosis. These results were confirmed by creating a phylogenetic tree based on concatenated sequences of SADH, ITS and 26S rRNA gene sequence regions. Optimal differentiation between C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis was predicted using digestion with NlaIII, producing discriminatory band sizes of: 131 and 505 bp; 74, 288 and 348 bp; and 131, 217 and 288 bp, respectively. This was confirmed using the reference strains and 79 clinical isolates. In conclusion, reliable discrimination was obtained by PCR-RFLP profile analysis of the SADH gene after digestion with NlaIII but not with BanI. C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis are involved in a small but significant number of invasive infections in Denmark.
PubMed ID
20056771 View in PubMed
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National surveillance of fungemia in denmark (2004 to 2009).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100186
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2011 Jan;49(1):325-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Maiken Cavling Arendrup
Brita Bruun
Jens Jørgen Christensen
Kurt Fuursted
Helle Krogh Johansen
Poul Kjældgaard
Jenny Dahl Knudsen
Lise Kristensen
Jens Møller
Lene Nielsen
Flemming Schønning Rosenvinge
Bent Røder
Henrik Carl Schønheyder
Marianne K Thomsen
Kjeld Truberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of Mycology, Department of Microbiological Surveillance and Research 43/117, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, 2300 Copenhagen, Denmark. mad@ssi.dk.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2011 Jan;49(1):325-34
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A 6-year nationwide study of fungemia in Denmark was performed using data from an active fungemia surveillance program and from laboratory information systems in nonparticipating regions. A total of 2,820 episodes of fungemia were recorded. The incidence increased from 2004 to 2007 (7.7 to 9.6/100,000) and decreased slightly from 2008 to 2009 (8.7 to 8.6/100,000). The highest incidences were seen at the extremes of age (i.e., 11.3 and 37.1/100,000 for those 50 years of age. The species distribution varied significantly by both age and gender. Candida species accounted for 98% of the pathogens, and C. albicans was predominant, although the proportion decreased (64.4% to 53.2%, P 4 µg/ml) occurred in C. albicans (7/1,183 [0.6%]), C. dubliniensis (2/65 [3.1%]), C. parapsilosis (5/83 [6.0%]), and C. tropicalis (7/104 [6.7%]). Overall, 70.8% of fungemia isolates were fully fluconazole susceptible, but the proportion decreased (79.7% to 68.9%, P = 0.02). The study confirmed an incidence rate of fungemia in Denmark three times higher than those in other Nordic countries and identified marked differences related to age and gender. Decreased susceptibility to fluconazole was frequent and increasing.
PubMed ID
20980569 View in PubMed
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