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Establishment of a bone-anchored auricular prosthesis (BAAP) program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187722
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2002 Dec 2;66(3):273-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-2002
Author
Brian W Rotenberg
Adrian L James
David Fisher
Jim Anderson
Blake C Papsin
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X8.
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2002 Dec 2;66(3):273-9
Date
Dec-2-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bone and Bones
Child
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - diagnosis - surgery
Ear, External - abnormalities - surgery
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Ontario
Osseointegration - physiology
Patient Selection
Prognosis
Prostheses and Implants
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - methods
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Bone-anchored auricular prostheses (BAAPs) are indicated for treatment of congenital or acquired microtia in children. This paper reports on our experience in establishing a BAAP program, including treatment algorithms, protocols and a discussion of the methodology, complications and patient satisfaction.
Eleven consecutive children using BAAPs were reviewed. Outcome measures include patient selection criteria, long-term stability of the BAAP, skin reactions around the site, and patient satisfaction.
A patient selection program was developed and implemented, followed by a management protocol for surgery and follow-up. All children (100%) achieved osseointegration, with only one site revision necessary. A variable degree of skin irritation was noted in just over one third (39%) of cases. All children were satisfied with their prosthesis.
The use of BAAPs in a pediatric population is a safe and viable method to correct disfiguring microtia. The final result is generally very acceptable to the child.
PubMed ID
12443817 View in PubMed
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Image-guided transnasal endoscopic techniques in the management of orbital disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141128
Source
Orbit. 2010 Dec;29(6):328-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Jerrod S Kent
Larry H Allen
Brian W Rotenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Ivey Eye Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Orbit. 2010 Dec;29(6):328-33
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Decompression, Surgical - adverse effects - methods
Endoscopy - adverse effects - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Orbital Diseases - pathology - radiography - surgery
Postoperative Complications - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Surgery, Computer-Assisted - adverse effects - methods
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To assess the utility of image-guided transnasal endoscopic surgery for a variety of orbital diseases requiring decompression of at least one orbital wall.
A descriptive case series of consecutive orbital procedures requiring decompression of at least one wall. All procedures were performed using a transnasal endoscopic approach and an intraoperative image-guided LandmarX system for anatomical guidance.
A 3-year review yielded 17 cases, including 6 cases with compressive mucoceles, 4 neoplasms, 4 patients with proptosis secondary to Graves' Ophthalmopathy, 1 case of an intraorbital abscess, 1 fungal mycetoma, and 1 hemangioma. These cases all had improved postoperative clinical status without any serious complications. The LandmarX system was a valuable intraoperative tool in all 17 cases.
The endoscopic transnasal approach to orbital decompression surgery allows for good visualization and is minimally invasive. Using this approach in conjunction with the LandmarX image-guided system allows for improved anatomical localization and provided good results in all cases.
PubMed ID
20807018 View in PubMed
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Informed consent when prescribing medication: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106201
Source
Laryngoscope. 2014 Jun;124(6):1296-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Jordan T Glicksman
Irvin Sherman
Brian W Rotenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Schulich School of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Laryngoscope. 2014 Jun;124(6):1296-300
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease
Communication
Double-Blind Method
Drug Prescriptions
Educational Status
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Informed consent
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Physician-Patient Relations
Prednisone - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Quality Improvement
Rhinitis - diagnosis - drug therapy
Risk assessment
Sinusitis - diagnosis - drug therapy
Teaching Materials
Abstract
To determine patient recall of specific risks associated with medication prescription and whether or not handouts are an effective tool to augment the informed consent process.
Double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial.
Informed consent for prednisone prescriptions was studied by comparing the effect of a verbal discussion (describing 10 specific adverse drug reactions) in conjunction with a handout going over same, to a verbal discussion alone. Blinded assessments occurred by telephone interview 2 to 4 weeks following the intervention. Outcomes assessed were the number of risks of prednisone that patients could list and the number of risks they recalled having discussed with their physician. Other demographic details were also collected.
Twenty-five participants were randomly allocated to each group. Without prompting, the median number of risks spontaneously recalled by the handout group was not significantly different than the control group, and both groups had very low recall (two vs. one, P?=?.24). When provided a list of potential side effects, it was observed that the handout group recalled a higher median number of risks having been discussed with their physician compared to patients in the control group (eight vs. five, P?=?.003). The groups' demographics were otherwise identical.
Patients in general did not remember discussing adverse prednisone risks with their physician even a short time after the discussion took place. Although the patient handout resulted in improved recall of risks following the prescription of prednisone, its importance in the informed medication consent process remains an open question.
1b.
PubMed ID
24222009 View in PubMed
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Use of complementary and alternative medical therapies for chronic rhinosinusitis: a canadian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140921
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2010 Oct;39(5):586-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Brian W Rotenberg
Kimberly A Bertens
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, St. Joseph’s Health Care, 268 Grosvenor Street, London, ON N6A 4V2. brian.rotenberg@sjhc.london.on.ca
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2010 Oct;39(5):586-93
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Complementary Therapies - methods - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Rhinitis - epidemiology - therapy
Sinusitis - epidemiology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Many Canadians use complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) to treat their chronic diseases. The objective of this study was to report patients' use of CAM for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and to determine factors predictive of CAM use.
A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Self-report questionnaires were administered to patients with CRS using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. The questionnaire included demographic information, questions pertaining to disease severity, and CAM use for CRS treatment. Statistical analysis was used to compare gender, age range, symptom duration, pharmacotherapy use, and surgical frequency among CAM users and nonusers. A binomial logistic regression model was developed to predict CAM use. Secondary outcome measures included factors predictive of CAM use, type of CAM used, and reasons for using CAM.
Data were obtained from 288 patients. Forty-five respondents (15.6%) had used CAM as a treatment for their CRS. CAM users were more likely to be females and more likely to have used each class of pharmacotherapy. On logistic regression, female gender and use of nasal corticosteroids were predictive of CAM use.
The use of CAM as treatment of CRS is common. Females and those who have used the various classes of pharmacotherapy are more likely to use CAM. Both female gender and nasal corticosteroid use are predictive of CAM use. Physicians should routinely inquire about CAM use from their patients with CRS.
PubMed ID
20828524 View in PubMed
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