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Anxiety disorders associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in the National Comorbidity Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174119
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2005 Jul;193(7):450-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Jitender Sareen
Tanya Houlahan
Brian J Cox
Gordon J G Asmundson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2005 Jul;193(7):450-4
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology
Suicide - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study examined the relationship between anxiety disorders and suicidal ideation or suicide attempts in a nationally representative sample (N = 5877; age, 15-54; response rate, 82.4%). A modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to make DSM-III-R mental disorder diagnoses. Two multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed with suicidal ideation (N = 754) and suicide attempts (N = 259) as dependent variables. In each regression, the independent variables entered were lifetime social phobia, panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, simple phobia, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Covariates in the analyses were sociodemographics, lifetime mood disorders, substance use disorders, nonaffective psychosis, antisocial personality disorder, and presence of three or more lifetime DSM-III-R diagnoses. PTSD was significantly associated with suicidal ideation (adjusted odds ratio = 2.79; p
PubMed ID
15985839 View in PubMed
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Source
Behav Res Ther. 2003 Jul;41(7):841-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Michael J Zvolensky
Willem A Arrindell
Steven Taylor
Martine Bouvard
Brian J Cox
Sherry H Stewart
Bonifacio Sandin
Samuel Jurado Cardenas
Georg H Eifert
Author Affiliation
Anxiety and Health Research Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, John Dewey Hall, Burlington, VT 05405-0134, USA. m_zvolen@dewey.uvm.edu
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2003 Jul;41(7):841-59
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mexico
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
United States
Abstract
In the present study, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-Revised (ASI-R; ) was administered to a large sample of persons (n=2786) from different cultures represented in six different countries: Canada, France, Mexico, The Netherlands, Spain, and the United States. We sought to (a) determine the factor structure and internal consistency of the ASI-R and (b) examine the correlations of the measure with psychiatric symptoms and personality dimensions in a single European non-English speaking country (The Netherlands). Partially consistent with the original hypothesis, the underlying structure of the anxiety sensitivity construct was generally similar across countries, tapping fear about the negative consequences of anxiety-related physical and social-cognitive sensations. Lower-order factors were moderately to strongly correlated with one another and showed good internal consistency. The observed lower-order ASI-R factors correlated with established psychiatric symptoms and with the personality trait of neuroticism. Partial correlations indicated that both factors are useful in accounting for variance in symptom measures. We discuss the results of this investigation in relation to the cross-cultural assessment of the anxiety sensitivity construct.
PubMed ID
12781249 View in PubMed
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Assessing self-critical perfectionism in clinical depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163434
Source
J Pers Assess. 2007 Jun;88(3):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Ian P Clara
Brian J Cox
Murray W Enns
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Canada. ian_clara@yahoo.ca
Source
J Pers Assess. 2007 Jun;88(3):309-16
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Comorbidity
Depression - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Personality Assessment
Self Concept
Abstract
Several facets of perfectionism have been strongly associated with depression and anxiety. Dunkley and Blankstein (2000) combined these maladaptive traits with self-criticism to create a general construct labeled self-critical perfectionism. In this study, we employed confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate a model for assessing self-critical perfectionism in a clinically depressed sample using scales from 3 instruments. Participants were 356 depressed adult outpatients who completed 2 multidimensional measures of perfectionism and a measure of self-criticism. A confirmatory factor model that separated a self-critical perfectionism construct from a more adaptive, achievement-striving component of perfectionism was supported. A composite scale assessing self-critical perfectionism demonstrated much larger correlations with distress measures compared to a composite scale assessing achievement striving and also showed evidence of discriminant validity. In this study, we provided further support for the valid assessment of self-critical perfectionism and extended evidence for its assessment to a clinically depressed sample.
PubMed ID
17518552 View in PubMed
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The associations between health risk behaviours and suicidal ideation and attempts in a nationally representative sample of young adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160280
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Oct;52(10):666-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Tracie O Afifi
Brian J Cox
Laurence Y Katz
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Oct;52(10):666-74
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Dangerous Behavior
Demography
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Social Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine associations between health risk behaviours and suicidal ideation and attempts in Canadian adolescents aged 12 to 13 years. Young adolescents think about and attempt suicide. However, most existing research on suicide has been conducted on individuals aged 15 years and older.
The present study examined a nationally representative Canadian sample of adolescents aged 12 to 13 years (n=2090). Health risk behaviours included disruptive (shoplifting, physical fighting, damaging property, fighting with a weapon, carrying a knife, and gambling), sexual (petting below the waist and sexual intercourse), and substance use behaviours (smoking cigarettes, consuming alcohol, marijuana or hash, and glue or solvents). Unadjusted and adjusted (for all significant health risk behaviour and psychiatric symptoms) models were tested.
All health risk behaviours were common among male and female adolescents. In unadjusted models, almost all health risk behaviours were associated with suicidal ideation and attempts among adolescent boys. In adjusted models, only damaging property, sexual intercourse, and smoking cigarettes remained statistically associated with suicidal ideation, while smoking cigarettes and using marijuana or hash remained statistically associated with suicide attempts among adolescent boys. All health risk behaviours were statistically associated with suicidal ideation and attempts among female adolescents in unadjusted models. In adjusted models, only carrying a knife remained statistically associated with suicidal ideation, while shoplifting and gambling remained statistically associated with suicide attempts among adolescent girls.
Health risk behaviours among young adolescents are associated with suicidal ideation and attempts among young adolescents. Recognizing health risk behaviours among young adolescents may be one means of understanding who among them is at increased risk of suicidality.
PubMed ID
18020114 View in PubMed
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The associations between peer and parental relationships and suicidal behaviours in early adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166394
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2006 Oct;51(11):698-703
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Sarah A Fotti
Laurence Y Katz
Tracie O Afifi
Brian J Cox
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2006 Oct;51(11):698-703
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parents
Peer Group
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To investigate associations between suicidal behaviours, including suicidal ideation and attempts, and poor peer and parental relationships in a nationally representative sample of Canadian adolescents aged 12 to 13 years.
We used Statistics Canada's National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth as the dataset. This cross-sectional sample included 1049 girls and 1041 boys aged 12 to 13 years. We obtained answers to self-report questionnaires that included measures of peer relationships, parental nurturance, and parental rejection, as well as information regarding suicidal ideation and attempts. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models were used for the analysis. We included depression in the multiple logistic regression analysis. Analyses were run separately for boys and girls.
The unadjusted logistic regression models found that, among early adolescent boys and girls, depression, poor peer relationships, decreased parental nurturance, and increased parental rejection were all significantly associated with suicidal ideation and attempts. However, after adjusting for all other variables in the multiple logistic regression models, poor peer relationships were no longer significantly associated with suicidal ideation among early adolescent boys and were only weakly associated among early adolescent girls.
Poor parental relationships and depression were more powerfully associated with suicidal ideation and attempts than were peer relationships in a nationally representative sample of boys and girls aged 12 to 13 years, and these factors may be important early intervention targets.
PubMed ID
17121168 View in PubMed
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Associations of obesity with psychiatric disorders and suicidal behaviors in a nationally representative sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151933
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2009 Apr;66(4):277-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Amber A Mather
Brian J Cox
Murray W Enns
Jitender Sareen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2009 Apr;66(4):277-85
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine whether obesity is associated with a variety of psychiatric outcomes after taking into account physical health conditions.
Data came from the public use dataset of the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.2 (age 15 years and older, N=36,984). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition psychiatric diagnoses of major depressive disorder, mania, panic attacks, panic disorder, social phobia, agoraphobia, alcohol dependence, and drug dependence were examined, as was suicidal behavior (ideation or attempts). Multiple logistic regression was utilized to examine the association between obesity (defined as body mass index >or=30) and mental health outcomes. Covariates in the regressions included sociodemographic factors and a measure of physical illness burden (the Charlson Comorbidity Index).
In adjusted models, obesity was positively related to several lifetime psychiatric disorders (depression, mania, panic attacks, social phobia, agoraphobia without panic disorder), any lifetime mood or anxiety disorder, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) range: 1.22-1.58]. Obesity was similarly positively associated with past-year depression, mania, panic attacks, social phobia, any anxiety disorder, and suicidal ideation (AOR range: 1.24-1.52), and negatively associated with past-year drug dependence (AOR=0.53, 95% CI 0.31-0.89). Most of these associations were found to be specific to women, while some were also present in men.
Independent of physical health conditions, obesity was associated with psychiatric disorders and suicidal behavior in the Canadian population. Possible mechanisms and clinical implications of these findings are considered.
PubMed ID
19302884 View in PubMed
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Broad and specific personality dimensions associated with major depression in a nationally representative sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179437
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2004 Jul-Aug;45(4):246-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
Brian J Cox
Lachlan A McWilliams
Murray W Enns
Ian P Clara
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2004 Jul-Aug;45(4):246-53
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Abstract
Separate lines of research using select study groups have identified both broad (neuroticism, extraversion) and specific (self-criticism, interpersonal dependency) personality dimensions associated with major depression. The current study sought to extend research on personality and depression to a large, nationally representative sample. Participants were from the National Comorbidity Survey Part II (N = 5,877). A detailed psychosocial battery that included items from established indices of neuroticism, extraversion, self-criticism, and three facets of interpersonal dependency was administered to all respondents. Separate regression analyses indicated that each of the personality dimensions was significantly associated with lifetime major depression. In a hierarchical multivariate regression analysis that controlled for sociodemographic variables, history of anxiety disorders, alcohol or substance abuse or dependence, dysthymic disorder, and current emotional distress, self-criticism was the only personality dimension that remained significantly associated with major depression. The inclusion of self-criticism also significantly improved the overall statistical model. Results from this nationally representative mental health survey indicate that self-criticism is robustly associated with major depression. In contrast, several other personality dimensions may be associated with major depression because of shared variance with psychiatric history and current emotional distress.
PubMed ID
15224266 View in PubMed
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Canadian military personnel's population attributable fractions of mental disorders and mental health service use associated with combat and peacekeeping operations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154695
Source
Am J Public Health. 2008 Dec;98(12):2191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Jitender Sareen
Shay-Lee Belik
Tracie O Afifi
Gordon J G Asmundson
Brian J Cox
Murray B Stein
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. sareen@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2008 Dec;98(12):2191-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment
Patient Education as Topic
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Relief Work
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated mental disorders, suicidal ideation, self-perceived need for treatment, and mental health service utilization attributable to exposure to peacekeeping and combat operations among Canadian military personnel.
With data from the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.2 Canadian Forces Supplement, a cross-sectional population-based survey of active Canadian military personnel (N = 8441), we estimated population attributable fractions (PAFs) of adverse mental health outcomes.
Exposure to either combat or peacekeeping operations was associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (men: PAF = 46.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 27.3, 62.7; women: PAF = 23.6%; 95% CI = 9.2, 40.1), 1 or more mental disorder assessed in the survey (men: PAF = 9.3%; 95% CI = 0.4, 18.1; women: PAF = 6.1%; 95% CI = 0.0, 13.4), and a perceived need for information (men: PAF = 12.3%; 95% CI = 4.1, 20.6; women: PAF = 7.9%; 95% CI = 1.3, 15.5).
A substantial proportion, but not the majority, of mental health-related outcomes were attributable to combat or peacekeeping deployment. Future studies should assess traumatic events and their association with physical injury during deployment, premilitary factors, and postdeployment psychosocial factors that may influence soldiers' mental health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18923111 View in PubMed
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Childhood adversity and perceived need for mental health care: findings from a Canadian community sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174562
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2005 Jun;193(6):396-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Jitender Sareen
William Fleisher
Brian J Cox
Stephen Hassard
Murray B Stein
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, PZ203-771 Bannatyne Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3N4, Canada.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2005 Jun;193(6):396-404
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child of Impaired Parents
Community Mental Health Services
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Divorce - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Health
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Previous community surveys have demonstrated that individuals with self-perceived need for mental health treatment in combination with meeting DSM-III-R criteria display the greatest levels of impairment in the community and have a higher likelihood of reporting parental psychopathology. The current investigation aims to replicate and extend these findings by examining the association between a wide range of childhood adversities with self-perceived need for mental health treatment and DSM-III-R diagnosis in a Canadian community sample (N = 8116). All respondents were questioned about their childhood experiences (physical and sexual abuse, emotional neglect, parental discord/separation, parental death, and parental psychopathology). After controlling for covariates in a multiple logistic regression, we found that emotional neglect (OR = 2.07), physical abuse (OR = 2.16), sexual abuse (OR = 2.39), paternal psychopathology (OR = 2.41), and maternal psychopathology (OR = 2.70) were independently and significantly associated with respondents meeting DSM criteria for a mental disorder and perceiving a need for treatment. These findings underscore the importance of future longitudinal studies considering the influence of a wide range of early childhood adversities on adult psychopathology and perceived need for treatment.
PubMed ID
15920380 View in PubMed
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Combat and peacekeeping operations in relation to prevalence of mental disorders and perceived need for mental health care: findings from a large representative sample of military personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162700
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Jul;64(7):843-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Jitender Sareen
Brian J Cox
Tracie O Afifi
Murray B Stein
Shay-Lee Belik
Graham Meadows
Gordon J G Asmundson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, 771 Bannatyne Ave, Winnipeg, MB PZ430, Canada R3E 3N4. sareen@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Jul;64(7):843-52
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Combat Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - supply & distribution - utilization
Military Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide - psychology
Violence - psychology
War
Abstract
Although military personnel are trained for combat and peacekeeping operations, accumulating evidence indicates that deployment-related exposure to traumatic events is associated with mental health problems and mental health service use.
To examine the relationships between combat and peacekeeping operations and the prevalence of mental disorders, self-perceived need for mental health care, mental health service use, and suicidality.
Cross-sectional, population-based survey.
Canadian military.
A total of 8441 currently active military personnel (aged 16-54 years).
The DSM-IV mental disorders (major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and alcohol dependence) were assessed using the World Mental Health version of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview, a fully structured lay-administered psychiatric interview. The survey included validated measures of self-perceived need for mental health treatment, mental health service use, and suicidal ideation. Lifetime exposure to peacekeeping and combat operations and witnessing atrocities or massacres (ie, mutilated bodies or mass killings) were assessed.
The prevalences of any past-year mental disorder assessed in the survey and self-perceived need for care were 14.9% and 23.2%, respectively. Most individuals meeting the criteria for a mental disorder diagnosis did not use any mental health services. Deployment to combat operations and witnessing atrocities were associated with increased prevalence of mental disorders and perceived need for care. After adjusting for the effects of exposure to combat and witnessing atrocities, deployment to peacekeeping operations was not associated with increased prevalence of mental disorders.
This is the first study to use a representative sample of active military personnel to examine the relationship between deployment-related experiences and mental health problems. It provides evidence of a positive association between combat exposure and witnessing atrocities and mental disorders and self-perceived need for treatment.
PubMed ID
17606818 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.