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Cryopreserved human embryos in Canada and their availability for research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182485
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2003 Dec;25(12):1026-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Françoise Baylis
Brenda Beagan
Josephine Johnston
Natalie Ram
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioethics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2003 Dec;25(12):1026-31
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cryopreservation
Embryo Research
Humans
Organ Preservation
Questionnaires
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
Abstract
To determine the number of cryopreserved human embryos at all Canadian in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics, the number of these embryos that have been donated to research, and the consent processes regarding the disposition of embryos no longer required for reproductive purposes.
A questionnaire was mailed to 24 fertility clinics identified as conducting IVF and cryopreservation, inviting completion of the questionnaire by telephone. Thirteen clinics (response rate 54%) completed the survey.
As of August 2003, all 13 clinics cryopreserve embryos not required for intrauterine transfer; in total, 15,615 embryos are currently in storage in these clinics. Nine clinics specifically offer patients the option of donating embryos to research; in total, 299 embryos have been allocated for research, about 2% of all embryos stored by these 13 clinics. All 9 clinics routinely seek consent for research use of embryos, with 7 clinics currently using such embryos for research to improve clinic practices.
The results highlight the difficulties of gathering accurate data on assisted human reproduction and related research in a context where there is no legislation governing these practices. Nonetheless, the data suggest there are very few cryopreserved embryos in Canada available for research and that even fewer of these may be potentially eligible for research due to incomplete or inadequate consent processes.
PubMed ID
14663537 View in PubMed
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Discomfort, judgment, and health care for queers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118680
Source
J Bioeth Inq. 2012 Jun;9(2):149-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Ami Harbin
Brenda Beagan
Lisa Goldberg
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. amiharbin@dal.ca
Source
J Bioeth Inq. 2012 Jun;9(2):149-60
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bisexuality
Canada
Cultural Competency
Family Practice
Female
Homosexuality, Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Narration
Physician-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Transgendered Persons
Women's health
Abstract
This paper draws on findings from qualitative interviews with queer and trans patients and with physicians providing care to queer and trans patients in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, to explore how routine practices of health care can perpetuate or challenge the marginalization of queers. One of the most common "measures" of improved cultural competence in health care practice is self-reported increases in confidence and comfort, though it seems unlikely that an increase in physician comfort levels with queer and trans patients will necessarily mean better health care for queers. More attention to current felt discomfort in patient-provider encounters is required. Policies and practices that avoid discomfort at all costs are not always helpful for care, and experiences of shared discomfort in queer health contexts are not always harmful.
PubMed ID
23180258 View in PubMed
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Values that matter, barriers that interfere: the struggle of Canadian nurses to enact their values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158756
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2007 Dec;39(4):37-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Brenda Beagan
Carolyn Ells
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational Therapy, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2007 Dec;39(4):37-57
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Conflict (Psychology)
Ethics, Professional
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses
Abstract
Qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 nurses in a Canadian city to explore the moral experience of nurses in their working lives. The participants were asked what they valued in their profession and how well their work lives enabled them act on their values. Almost uniformly, they expressed commitment to the values of helping others, caring, making a difference, patient-centredness, advocacy, professional integrity, holistic care, and sharing knowledge for patient empowerment. They identified several challenges and frustrations experienced in attempting to enact these values. System-level challenges included professional hierarchies, organizational structures, issues in the health-care system, and power dynamics. Removing these barriers cannot be left to nurses alone. It requires complex, wide-ranging strategies: system change, power restructuring, and the creation of ethical climates and cultures that support values that are essential to good patient care.
Notes
ReprintIn: Can J Nurs Res. 2009 Mar;41(1):86-10719485047
PubMed ID
18277787 View in PubMed
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