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Canadian variation by province in rheumatoid arthritis initiating anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy: results from the optimization of adalimumab trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140779
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Dec;37(12):2469-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Christopher Pease
Janet E Pope
Carter Thorne
Boulos Paul Haraoui
Don Truong
Claire Bombardier
Jessica Widdifield
Eliofotisti Psaradellis
John S Sampalis
Ashley Bonner
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Dec;37(12):2469-74
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Monoclonal - economics - therapeutic use
Antirheumatic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Canada
Female
Humans
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Questionnaires
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Registries
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - immunology
Abstract
We compared variations among Canadian provinces in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) initiating anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy.
Data were obtained from the Optimization of Humira trial (OH) and from the Ontario Biologics Research Initiative (OBRI). Baseline characteristics were compared between regions: Ontario (ON), Quebec (QC), and other provinces (OTH). We compared Ontario OH to OBRI patients who were initiating anti-TNF therapy.
In 300 OH patients, mean age was 54.8 years (13.3). There were 151 (50.3%) ON patients, 57 from QC (19%), and 92 from OTH (30.7%). Regional differences were seen in the number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) ever taken (ON: 3.8 ± 1.4, QC: 3.1 ± 1.1, OTH: 3.3 ± 1.4; p
PubMed ID
20843910 View in PubMed
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Incidence and predictors of secondary fibromyalgia in an early arthritis cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122649
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2013 Jun;72(6):949-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Yvonne C Lee
Bing Lu
Gilles Boire
Boulos Paul Haraoui
Carol A Hitchon
Janet E Pope
J Carter Thorne
Edward Clark Keystone
Daniel H Solomon
Vivian P Bykerk
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ylee9@partners.org
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2013 Jun;72(6):949-54
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies - immunology
Arthritis - epidemiology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Fibromyalgia - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Secondary fibromyalgia (FM) is common among patients with inflammatory arthritis, but little is known about its incidence and the factors leading to its development. The authors examined the incidence of secondary FM in an early inflammatory arthritis cohort, and assessed the association between pain, inflammation, psychosocial variables and the clinical diagnosis of FM.
Data from 1487 patients in the Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort, a prospective, observational Canadian cohort of early inflammatory arthritis patients were analysed. Diagnoses of FM were determined by rheumatologists. Incidence rates were calculated, and Cox regression models were used to determine HRs for FM risk.
The cumulative incidence rate was 6.77 (95% CI 5.19 to 8.64) per 100 person-years during the first 12 months after inflammatory arthritis diagnosis, and decreased to 3.58 (95% CI 1.86 to 6.17) per 100 person-years 12-24 months after arthritis diagnosis. Pain severity (HR 2.01, 95% CI 1.17 to 3.46) and poor mental health (HR 1.99, 95% CI 1.09 to 3.62) predicted FM risk. Citrullinated peptide positivity (HR 0.48, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.88) was associated with decreased FM risk. Serum inflammatory markers and swollen joint count were not significantly associated with FM risk.
The incidence of FM was from 3.58 to 6.77 cases per 100 person-years, and was highest during the first 12 months after diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis. Although inflammation was not associated with the clinical diagnosis of FM, pain severity and poor mental health were associated with the clinical diagnosis of FM. Seropositivity was inversely associated with the clinical diagnosis of FM.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22791744 View in PubMed
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