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Acculturation and sexual function in Asian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171478
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Lori A Brotto
Heather M Chik
Andrew G Ryder
Boris B Gorzalka
Brooke N Seal
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics & Gyneacology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Lori.Brotto@vch.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Cultural effects on sexuality are pervasive and potentially of great clinical importance, but have not yet received sustained empirical attention. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of acculturation on sexual permissiveness and sexual function, with a particular focus on arousal in Asian women living in Canada. We also compared questionnaire responses between Asian and Euro-Canadian groups in hopes of investigating whether acculturation captured unique information not predicted by ethnic group affiliation. Euro-Canadian (n = 173) and Asian (n = 176) female university students completed a battery of questionnaires in private. Euro-Canadian women had significantly more sexual knowledge and experiences, more liberal attitudes, and higher rates of desire, arousal, sexual receptivity, and sexual pleasure. Anxiety from anticipated sexual activity was significantly higher in Asian women, but the groups did not differ significantly on relationship satisfaction or problems with sexual function. Acculturation to Western culture, as well as maintained affiliation with traditional Asian heritage, were both significantly and independently related to sexual attitudes above and beyond length of residency in Canada, and beyond ethnic group comparisons. Overall, these data suggest that measurement of acculturation may capture information about an individual's unique acculturation pattern that is not evident when focusing solely on ethnic group comparisons or length of residency, and that such findings may be important in facilitating the assessment, classification, and treatment of sexual difficulties in Asian women.
PubMed ID
16362246 View in PubMed
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Differences in sexual guilt and desire in east Asian and Euro-Canadian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130425
Source
J Sex Res. 2012;49(6):594-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lori A Brotto
Jane S T Woo
Boris B Gorzalka
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. lori.brotto@vch.ca
Source
J Sex Res. 2012;49(6):594-602
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
British Columbia
Coitus - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Guilt
Humans
Male
Self Report
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Partners
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Differences in sexual desire between individuals of East Asian and European descent are well-documented, with East Asian individuals reporting lower sexual desire. The mechanisms that underlie this disparity have received little empirical attention. Recent research has found that sex guilt, "a generalized expectancy for self-mediated punishment for violating or for anticipating violating standards of proper sexual conduct" (Mosher & Cross, 1971 , p. 27), mediates the relationship between culture and sexual desire in East Asian and Euro-Canadian women. The goal of this study was to explore this role of sex guilt in men. Male Euro-Canadian (n = 38) and East Asian (n = 45) university students completed online questionnaires. The East Asian men reported significantly lower sexual desire and significantly higher sex guilt. Sex guilt was a significant mediator of the relationship between ethnicity and sexual desire, as well as a significant mediator between mainstream acculturation and sexual desire. Among the East Asian men, mainstream acculturation was significantly and negatively correlated with sex guilt such that increasing mainstream acculturation was associated with less sex guilt. The diagnostic and clinical implications of the findings are discussed.
PubMed ID
22004159 View in PubMed
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Rape myth acceptance in men who completed the prostitution offender program of British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157837
Source
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2009 Jun;53(3):305-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Carolin Klein
M Alexis Kennedy
Boris B Gorzalka
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. carolinklein@psych.ubc.ca
Source
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2009 Jun;53(3):305-15
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude
British Columbia
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prostitution
Rape - psychology
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Social Perception
Young Adult
Abstract
In an effort to characterize the attitudes and characteristics of men who solicit sex, this study investigated rape myth acceptance as assessed by a modification of Burt's Rape Myth Acceptance Scale. The participants were all men who took part in the Prostitution Offender Program of British Columbia after being arrested for attempting to solicit sex from an undercover police officer. Relationships between endorsement of rape myths, other attitudes, sexual behavior, and demographic variables were examined. Results reveal that age, education, use of pornography, ideal frequency of intercourse, and believing that purchasing sex is a problem are all negatively correlated with rape myth acceptance. Positive correlations were found between rape myth acceptance and sexual conservatism, sexual violence/coercion, and social desirability. Results are discussed in terms of the association between rape myth acceptance and the violence frequently perpetrated against those working in the sex trade.
PubMed ID
18397991 View in PubMed
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The relationship between sex guilt and sexual desire in a community sample of Chinese and Euro-Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137254
Source
J Sex Res. 2012;49(2-3):290-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jane S T Woo
Lori A Brotto
Boris B Gorzalka
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia.
Source
J Sex Res. 2012;49(2-3):290-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
China - ethnology
Coitus
Culture
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Guilt
Humans
Self Report
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Abstract
Many studies have documented significant differences in sexual desire between individuals of European and Chinese descent, but few have examined the mechanisms that underlie these differences. A recent study of university students found that sex guilt is one mechanism by which culture influences sexual desire among Chinese and Euro-Canadian women. The goal of this study was to examine whether sex guilt also mediates the relationship between ethnicity and sexual desire in a sample that is more representative of women in the general population. Euro-Canadian (n = 78; mean age = 42.1 years) and Chinese (n = 87; mean age = 42.8 years) women were recruited from the community. Euro-Canadian women reported greater sexual desire and less sex guilt. In the entire sample, sex guilt mediated the relationship between ethnicity and sexual desire such that the Chinese women reported greater sex guilt, which, in turn, was associated with lower sexual desire. Among the Chinese women, sex guilt mediated the relationship between mainstream acculturation (degree of Westernization) and sexual desire such that more Westernized Chinese women reported less sex guilt, which, in turn, was associated with greater sexual desire. These results support recent findings and further suggest that sex guilt may be one mechanism by which ethnicity affects sexual desire.
PubMed ID
21302175 View in PubMed
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The role of sexuality in cervical cancer screening among Chinese women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148582
Source
Health Psychol. 2009 Sep;28(5):598-604
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Jane S T Woo
Lori A Brotto
Boris B Gorzalka
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Health Psychol. 2009 Sep;28(5):598-604
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
British Columbia
China - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Mass Screening - psychology
Papanicolaou test
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology - psychology
Questionnaires
Sexuality
Social Values - ethnology
Vaginal Smears - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Chinese women have significantly lower rates of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing than Euro-Canadian women despite efforts to promote testing. Evidence suggests that Chinese women's reluctance to undergo Pap testing may be related to culture-linked discomfort with sexuality. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of sexuality in the interaction between acculturation and Pap testing.
Euro-Canadian (n = 213) and Chinese (n = 260) female university students completed a battery of questionnaires.
Questionnaires assessing sexual knowledge, sexual function, acculturation, and Pap testing frequency.
Euro-Canadian women had significantly more accurate sexual knowledge, higher levels of sexual functioning, a broader repertoire of sexual activities, and higher Pap testing rates. Chinese women were more likely to cite embarrassment as a barrier to Pap testing. Heritage acculturation, but not mainstream acculturation, predicted Chinese women's Pap testing behavior. Mainstream acculturation was associated with more accurate sexual knowledge and greater sexual desire and satisfaction.
The findings provide support for the hypothesis that low Pap testing rates in Chinese women may be associated with heritage acculturation, although the hypothesis that sexual function would predict Pap testing behavior was not supported.
PubMed ID
19751086 View in PubMed
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