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Direct mail improves knowledge of basic life support guidelines in general practice: a randomised study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119889
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Niels Secher
Mette Marie Mikkelsen
Kasper Adelborg
Ronni Mikkelsen
Erik Lerkevang Grove
Jens Mørch Rubak
Peter Vedsted
Bo Løfgren
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:72
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - standards
Clinical Competence - standards
Denmark
Female
General Practice - education
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postal Service
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Abstract
Implementation of new guidelines into clinical practice is often incomplete. Direct mail is a simple way of providing information to physicians and may improve implementation of new guidelines on basic life support (BLS). The aim of this study was to describe knowledge of the most recent European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines for BLS among general practitioners (GPs) and investigate whether direct mail improves theoretical knowledge of these guidelines.
All general practice clinics (n=351) in Central Denmark Region were randomised to receive either direct mail (intervention) or no direct mail (control). The direct mail consisted of the official ERC BLS/AED poster and a cover letter outlining changes in compression depth and frequency in the new guidelines. In general practice clinics randomised to intervention, every GP received a direct mail addressed personally to him/her. Two weeks later, a multiple-choice questionnaire on demographics and BLS guidelines were mailed to GPs in both groups.
In total, 830 GPs were included in this study (direct mail, n=408; control, n=422). The response rate was 58%. The majority (91%) of GPs receiving direct mail were familiar with BLS Guidelines 2010 compared to 72% in the control group (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
23062629 View in PubMed
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Organisation of in-hospital cardiac arrest teams - a nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270274
Source
Resuscitation. 2015 Apr;89:123-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Kasper Glerup Lauridsen
Anders Sjørslev Schmidt
Kasper Adelborg
Bo Løfgren
Source
Resuscitation. 2015 Apr;89:123-8
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Clinical Protocols
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Heart Arrest - therapy
Hospital Rapid Response Team - organization & administration
Humans
Abstract
In-hospital cardiac arrests are treated by a team of health care providers. Improving team performance may increase survival. Currently, no international standards for cardiac arrest teams exist in terms of member composition and allocation of tasks.
To describe the composition of in-hospital cardiac arrest teams and review pre-arrest allocation of tasks.
A nationwide cross-sectional study was performed. Data on cardiac arrest teams and pre-arrest allocation of tasks were collected from protocols on resuscitation required for hospital accreditation in Denmark. Additional data were collected through telephone interviews and email correspondence. Psychiatric hospitals and hospitals serving outpatients only were excluded.
Data on the cardiac arrest team were available from 44 of 47 hospitals. The median team size was 5 (25th percentile; 75th percentile: 4; 6) members. Teams included a nurse anaesthetist (100%), a medical house officer (82%), an orderly (73%), an anaesthesiology house officer (64%) and a medical assistant (20%). Less likely to participate was a cardiology house officer (23%) or a cardiology specialist registrar (5%). Overall, a specialist registrar was represented on 20% of teams and 20% of cardiac arrest teams had a different team composition during nights and weekends. In total, 41% of teams did not define a team leader pre-arrest, and the majority of the teams did not define the tasks of the remaining team members.
In Denmark, there are major differences among cardiac arrest teams. This includes team size, profession of team members, medical specialty and seniority of the physicians. Nearly half of the hospitals do not define a cardiac arrest team leader and the majority do not define the tasks of the remaining team members.
PubMed ID
25617486 View in PubMed
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[Registries of in-hospital cardiac arrest are a challenge in daily clinical practice].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125755
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Mar 26;174(13):856-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-26-2012
Author
Niels Henrik Vinther Krarup
Bo Løfgren
Troels Krarup Hansen
Søren Paaske Johnsen
Author Affiliation
Hjertemedicinsk Afdeling B, Aarhus Universitetshospital, Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. nhkrarup@gmail.com
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Mar 26;174(13):856-9
Date
Mar-26-2012
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - standards
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Heart Arrest - mortality
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Prognosis
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Survival Rate
Abstract
In-hospital cardiac arrest carries a poor prognosis. Registries of in-hospital cardiac arrest provide the opportunity to improve quality of care and conduct research of disease mechanisms and treatment. This paper describes the preliminary experience with systematic registration of in-hospital cardiac arrest at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Data from 102 patients are presented and practical aspects and challenges of establishing a registry and implementing the collection of data in daily clinical practice are discussed.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Mar 26;174(13):85422456170
PubMed ID
22456171 View in PubMed
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