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Acute and long-term psychiatric side effects of mefloquine: a follow-up on Danish adverse event reports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264815
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2015 Jan-Feb;13(1):80-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Åsa Ringqvist
Per Bech
Birte Glenthøj
Eskild Petersen
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2015 Jan-Feb;13(1):80-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Antimalarials - adverse effects
Anxiety - chemically induced - epidemiology
Bipolar Disorder - chemically induced - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - chemically induced - epidemiology
Electronic Health Records
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hallucinations - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mefloquine - adverse effects
Mental Disorders - chemically induced - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Psychoses, Substance-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Questionnaires
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to explore the profile of acute and long-term psychiatric side effects associated with mefloquine.
Subjects (n = 73) reported to a Danish national register during five consecutive years for mefloquine associated side effects were included. Acute psychiatric side effects were retrospectively assessed using the SCL-90-R and questions based on Present State Examination (PSE). Subjects reporting suspected psychotic states were contacted for a personal PSE interview. Electronic records of psychiatric hospitalizations and diagnoses were cross-checked. Long-term effects were evaluated with SF-36. SCL-90-R and SF-36 data were compared to age- and gender matched controls.
In the SCL-90-R, clinically significant scores for anxiety, phobic anxiety and depression were found in 55%, 51%, and 44% of the mefloquine group. Substantial acute phase psychotic symptoms were found in 15% and were time-limited. Illusions/hallucinations were more frequently observed among women. Cases of hypomania/mania in the acute phase were 5.5%. Significant long-term mental health effects were demonstrated for the SF-36 subscales mental health (MH), role emotional (RE), and vitality (VT) in the mefloquine group compared to matched controls.
The most frequent acute psychiatric problems were anxiety, depression, and psychotic symptoms. Data indicated that subjects experiencing acute mefloquine adverse side effects may develop long-term mental health problems with a decreased sense of global quality of life with lack of energy, nervousness, and depression.
PubMed ID
25435322 View in PubMed
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Association of antipsychotic polypharmacy with health service cost: a register-based cost analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135728
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2012 Jun;13(3):355-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Lone Baandrup
Jan Sørensen
Henrik Lublin
Merete Nordentoft
Birte Glenthoj
Author Affiliation
Centre for Neuropsychiatric Schizophrenia Research, Copenhagen University Hospital, Mental Health Services - Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, Nordre Ringvej 29-67, 2600 Glostrup, Denmark. lone.baandrup@regionh.dk
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2012 Jun;13(3):355-63
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Confidence Intervals
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Polypharmacy
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - economics
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the association of antipsychotic polypharmacy in schizophrenia with cost of primary and secondary health service use.
Comparative analysis of health service cost for patients prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy versus antipsychotic monotherapy. Resource utilisation and costs were described using central Danish registers for a 2 year period (2007-2008). We included patients attached to one of two Danish psychiatric referral centres in 1 January 2008 and/or 1 January 2009. Their prescribed treatment with either antipsychotic polypharmacy or monotherapy at the two cross-sectional dates was recorded and used as proxy of polypharmacy exposure during the preceding year. A multivariate generalised linear model was fitted with total costs of primary and secondary health service use as dependent variable, and antipsychotic polypharmacy, diagnosis, age, gender, disease duration, psychiatric inpatient admissions, and treatment site as covariates.
The sample consisted of 736 outpatients with a diagnosis in the schizophrenia spectrum. Antipsychotic polypharmacy was associated with significantly higher total health service costs compared with monotherapy (2007: 25% higher costs; 2008: 17% higher costs) when adjusting for potential confounders and risk factors. A subgroup analysis suggested that the excessive costs associated with antipsychotic polypharmacy were partly accounted for by the functional level of the patients.
The results demonstrate that antipsychotic co-prescribing is associated with increased use of health care services, even though no causal relations can be inferred from an observational study.
PubMed ID
21452062 View in PubMed
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Intragenic deletions affecting two alternative transcripts of the IMMP2L gene in patients with Tourette syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264130
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2014 Nov;22(11):1283-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Birgitte Bertelsen
Linea Melchior
Lars R Jensen
Camilla Groth
Birte Glenthøj
Renata Rizzo
Nanette Mol Debes
Liselotte Skov
Karen Brøndum-Nielsen
Peristera Paschou
Asli Silahtaroglu
Zeynep Tümer
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2014 Nov;22(11):1283-9
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7 - genetics
DNA Copy Number Variations
Denmark
Endopeptidases - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Exons
Female
Gene Deletion
Gene Rearrangement
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Male
Mice
Microarray Analysis
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Tics - genetics
Tourette Syndrome - genetics
Abstract
Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, and the disorder is often accompanied by comorbidities such as attention-deficit hyperactivity-disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Tourette syndrome has a complex etiology, but the underlying environmental and genetic factors are largely unknown. IMMP2L (inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase, subunit 2) located on chromosome 7q31 is one of the genes suggested as a susceptibility factor in disease pathogenesis. Through screening of a Danish cohort comprising 188 unrelated Tourette syndrome patients for copy number variations, we identified seven patients with intragenic IMMP2L deletions (3.7%), and this frequency was significantly higher (P=0.0447) compared with a Danish control cohort (0.9%). Four of the seven deletions identified did not include any known exons of IMMP2L, but were within intron 3. These deletions were found to affect a shorter IMMP2L mRNA species with two alternative 5'-exons (one including the ATG start codon). We showed that both transcripts (long and short) were expressed in several brain regions, with a particularly high expression in cerebellum and hippocampus. The current findings give further evidence for the role of IMMP2L as a susceptibility factor in Tourette syndrome and suggest that intronic changes in disease susceptibility genes should be investigated further for presence of alternatively spliced exons.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24549057 View in PubMed
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Is an Early Age at Illness Onset in Schizophrenia Associated With Increased Genetic Susceptibility? Analysis of Data From the Nationwide Danish Twin Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288283
Source
EBioMedicine. 2017 Apr;18:320-326
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Rikke Hilker
Dorte Helenius
Birgitte Fagerlund
Axel Skytthe
Kaare Christensen
Thomas M Werge
Merete Nordentoft
Birte Glenthøj
Source
EBioMedicine. 2017 Apr;18:320-326
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - genetics
Twins
Young Adult
Abstract
Early age at illness onset has been viewed as an important liability marker for schizophrenia, which may be associated with an increased genetic vulnerability. A twin approach can be valuable, because it allows for the investigation of specific illness markers in individuals with a shared genetic background.
We linked nationwide registers to identify a cohort of twin pairs born in Denmark from 1951 to 2000 (N=31,524 pairs), where one or both twins had a diagnosis in the schizophrenia spectrum. We defined two groups consisting of; N=788 twin pairs (affected with schizophrenia spectrum) and a subsample of N=448 (affected with schizophrenia). Survival analysis was applied to investigate the effect of age at illness onset.
We found that early age at illness onset compared to later onset in the first diagnosed twin can be considered a major risk factor for developing schizophrenia in the second twin. Additionally, we found that the stronger genetic component in MZ twins compared to DZ twins is manifested in the proximity of assigned diagnosis within pairs.
Early onset schizophrenia could be linked to a more severe genetic predisposition, indicating that age might be perceived as a clinical marker for genetic vulnerability for the illness.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28427946 View in PubMed
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