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Determination of new cutoff values for indirect immunofluorescence antibody test for Q fever diagnosis in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148592
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2009 Oct;65(2):93-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Steen Villumsen
Charlotte Svaerke Jørgensen
Birgitte Smith
Søren Uldum
Peter Schiellerup
Karen Angeliki Krogfelt
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Department of Bacteriology, Mycology, and Parasitology, Copenhagen, Denmark. stv@ssi.dk
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2009 Oct;65(2):93-8
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Coxiella burnetii - immunology
Denmark
Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect - methods - standards
Human Experimentation
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Q Fever - diagnosis
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Q fever is a ubiquitous zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. The disease is emerging in many parts of the world, likely because of increased awareness and availability of better diagnostics. The diagnosis is primarily based on serology. Because the prevalence of the disease varies worldwide, the establishment of local cutoff values is needed. A baseline for antibodies against C. burnetii in Denmark was defined by testing sera from healthy Danish volunteers using a commercially available immunofluorescence antibody test. Cross-reactivity was studied on sera obtained from patients experiencing clinically related diseases. The cutoff titers suggested by the manufacturer were found to result in very low specificity of the test. The specificity was, however, effectively increased by using cutoff titers based on the local baseline and equal to immunoglobulin M (IgM) phase I > or =128, IgM phase II > or =256, IgG phase I > or =512, and IgG phase II > or =1024.
PubMed ID
19748417 View in PubMed
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The influence of probiotics for preterm neonates on the incidence of atopic dermatitis-results from a historically controlled cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282042
Source
Arch Dermatol Res. 2017 May;309(4):259-264
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Julie A Damm
Birgitte Smith
Gorm Greisen
Karen A Krogfelt
Maja-Lisa Clausen
Tove Agner
Source
Arch Dermatol Res. 2017 May;309(4):259-264
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - diet therapy - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Premature
Male
Premature Birth - diet therapy - epidemiology
Prevalence
Probiotics - therapeutic use
Abstract
Probiotic supplementation is a promising preventive strategy for atopic dermatitis (AD). To help clarifying the significance of timing with respect to prevention of AD, we here evaluate the benefit of prophylactic use of probiotic supplementation in neonates younger than 30 weeks of gestation. Preterm children from the Department of Neonatology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark from two different admission periods were included in a historically controlled cohort study. Neonates from January 2007 to February 2010, not treated with and neonates from March 2010 to February 2013 treated with probiotic were enrolled. Main outcome was prevalence of AD, and secondary outcomes were use of topical corticosteroids, and number of skin-related visits to GPs and dermatologists. 527 preterm neonates were included in the study, 249 treated and 278 not treated with probiotics. Response rate for the two cohorts was 76.7 and 77.7% respectively. The prevalence of AD was similar in the two groups (20.9% in the probiotic treated group versus 17.1% in the not treated group, p?=?0.33). No significant differences were found between the groups with respect to treatment with topical corticosteroids, or visits at GPs or dermatologist. We found no indication that probiotics may prevent AD when administered to neonates?
PubMed ID
28271213 View in PubMed
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Outbreak of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection from consumption of beef sausage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152172
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Apr 15;48(8):e78-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2009
Author
Steen Ethelberg
Birgitte Smith
Mia Torpdahl
Morten Lisby
Jeppe Boel
Tenna Jensen
Eva Møller Nielsen
Kåre Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology, Mycology, and Parasitology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. set@ssi.dk
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Apr 15;48(8):e78-81
Date
Apr-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases as Topic
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Meat Products - microbiology
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Abstract
We describe an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O26:H11 infection in 20 patients (median age, 2 years). The source of the infection was an organic fermented beef sausage. The source was discovered by using credit card information to obtain and compare customer transaction records from the computer systems of supermarkets.
PubMed ID
19272017 View in PubMed
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