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Chronic fatigue in a population sample: definitions and heterogeneity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172843
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Sep;35(9):1337-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Patrick F Sullivan
Nancy L Pedersen
Andreas Jacks
Birgitta Evengård
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7264, USA. pfsulliv@med.unc.edu
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Sep;35(9):1337-48
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diagnosis, Differential
Epidemiologic Studies
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries - standards - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
Twin Studies as Topic
Abstract
Numerous nosological decisions are made when moving from the common human symptom of unusual fatigue to the rare chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). These decisions have infrequently been subjected to rigorous evaluation.
We obtained telephone interview data on fatiguing symptoms from 31406 individuals twins in the Swedish Twin Registry aged 42-64 years; 5330 subjects who endorsed fatigue and possessed no exclusionary condition formed the analytic group. We evaluated the definition and classification of CFS-like illness using graphical methods, regression models, and latent class analysis.
Our results raise fundamental questions about the 1994 Centers for Disease Control criteria as (1) there was no empirical support for the requirement of four of eight cardinal CFS symptoms; (2) these eight symptoms were not equivalent in their capacity to predict fatigue; and (3) no combination of symptoms was markedly more heritable. Critically, latent class analysis identified a syndrome strongly resembling CFS-like illness.
Our data are consistent with the 'existence' of CFS-like illness although the dominant nosological approach captures population-level variation poorly. We suggest that studying a more parsimonious case definition - impairing chronic fatigue not due to a known cause - would represent a way forward.
PubMed ID
16168156 View in PubMed
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Climate change and infectious diseases in the Arctic: establishment of a circumpolar working group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257279
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Alan J Parkinson
Birgitta Evengard
Jan C Semenza
Nicholas Ogden
Malene L Børresen
Jim Berner
Michael Brubaker
Anders Sjöstedt
Magnus Evander
David M Hondula
Bettina Menne
Natalia Pshenichnaya
Prabhu Gounder
Tricia Larose
Boris Revich
Karsten Hueffer
Ann Albihn
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The Arctic, even more so than other parts of the world, has warmed substantially over the past few decades. Temperature and humidity influence the rate of development, survival and reproduction of pathogens and thus the incidence and prevalence of many infectious diseases. Higher temperatures may also allow infected host species to survive winters in larger numbers, increase the population size and expand their habitat range. The impact of these changes on human disease in the Arctic has not been fully evaluated. There is concern that climate change may shift the geographic and temporal distribution of a range of infectious diseases. Many infectious diseases are climate sensitive, where their emergence in a region is dependent on climate-related ecological changes. Most are zoonotic diseases, and can be spread between humans and animals by arthropod vectors, water, soil, wild or domestic animals. Potentially climate-sensitive zoonotic pathogens of circumpolar concern include Brucella spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella spp., Clostridium botulinum, Francisella tularensis, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bacillus anthracis, Echinococcus spp., Leptospira spp., Giardia spp., Cryptosporida spp., Coxiella burnetti, rabies virus, West Nile virus, Hantaviruses, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25317383 View in PubMed
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Climate change and water security with a focus on the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130014
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:65-68.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
transport of contaminants is growing as a health concern for populations in the area (6�8). Decision makers will have to very clearly include life quality aspects of future generations in the work as the �CLUSTER: VULNERABLE POPULATIONS IN THE ARCTIC Global Health Action 2011. # 2011 Birgitta Evengard
  1 document  
Author
Birgitta Evengard
Jim Berner
Michael Brubaker
Gert Mulvad
Boris Revich
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. birgitta.evengard@climi.umu.se
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:65-68.
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
216402
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Arctic Regions
Climate
Climate change
Environmental monitoring
Health status
Humans
Water Cycle
Water supply
Abstract
Water is of fundamental importance for human life; access to water of good quality is of vital concern for mankind. Currently however, the situation is under severe pressure due to several stressors that have a clear impact on access to water. In the Arctic, climate change is having an impact on water availability by melting glaciers, decreasing seasonal rates of precipitation, increasing evapotranspiration, and drying lakes and rivers existing in permafrost grounds. Water quality is also being impacted as manmade pollutants stored in the environment are released, lowland areas are flooded with salty ocean water during storms, turbidity from permafrost-driven thaw and erosion is increased, and the growth or emergence of natural pollutants are increased. By 2030 it is estimated that the world will need to produce 50% more food and energy which means a continuous increase in demand for water. Decisionmakers will have to very clearly include life quality aspects of future generations in the work as impact of ongoing changes will be noticeable, in many cases, in the future. This article will focus on effects of climate-change on water security with an Arctic perspective giving some examples from different countries how arising problems are being addressed.
Notes
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Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Nov;98(11):2072-818382002
Cites: Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2006 Jan;63(1):100-716399161
PubMed ID
22043217 View in PubMed
Documents

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Differences between patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and with chronic fatigue at an infectious disease clinic in Stockholm, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30867
Source
Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2003 Aug;57(4):361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Birgitta Evengård
Eva Jonzon
Anneli Sandberg
Töres Theorell
Gudrun Lindh
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute at Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. birgitta.evengard@labmed.ki.se
Source
Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2003 Aug;57(4):361-8
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Fatigue - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Fibromyalgia - physiopathology
Humans
Infection - complications
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychopathology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Background data were collected from patients presenting with fatigue at the clinic of infectious diseases at Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm. The main purpose was to look for differences as to demographic and functional status for patients fulfilling criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and chronic fatigue (CF). A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed using a variety of instruments. A thorough medical investigation was performed. No difference was found as to social situation, occupation and illness attributions for patients in the two categories. Patients with CFS reported in general a higher degree of 'sickness' with more self-reported somatic symptoms, more self-reported functional impairment and more absence from work. A higher degree of psychiatric comorbidity was observed in CF than in CFS patients. A majority of CFS patients (80%) had an acute infectious onset compared to 43% in the CF group. Presently used criteria might, according to findings presented here, define two different patient categories in a population characterized by severe, prolonged fatigue. Because CFS patients (compared to patients with CF) have more somatic symptoms, more often report an infectious, sudden onset and have less psychiatric comorbidity, and CF patients seem to have more of an emotional, burn-out-like component one could speculate about the existence of different pathogenetic backgrounds behind the two diagnoses.
PubMed ID
12839515 View in PubMed
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Discrepancies in data reporting of zoonotic infectious diseases across the Nordic countries - a call for action in the era of climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299424
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 Dec; 78(1):1601991
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Anna Omazic
Camilla Berggren
Tomas Thierfelder
Anders Koch
Birgitta Evengard
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry, Environment and Feed hygiene , National Veterinary Institute (SVA) , Uppsala , Sweden.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 Dec; 78(1):1601991
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Emerging infections have in recent years caused enormous health problems. About 70% of these infections are zoonotic e.g. arise from natural foci in the environment. As climate change impacts ecosystems there is an ongoing transition of infectious diseases in humans. With the fastest changes of the climate occurring in the Arctic, this area is important to monitor for infections with potentials to be climate sensitive. To meet the increasing demand for evidence-based policies regarding climate-sensitive infectious diseases, epidemiological studies are vital. A review of registered data for nine potentially climate-sensitive infections, collected from health authorities in Denmark/Greenland, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, found that performing such studies across countries is constrained by incompatible reporting systems and differences in regulations. To address this, international standardisation is recommended.
PubMed ID
30983540 View in PubMed
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[Emotional exhaustion common among women in the public sector]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45992
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 May 2;99(18):2047-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2-2002
Author
Aleksander Perski
Giorgio Grossi
Birgitta Evengård
Vanja Blomkvist
Berrin Yilbar
Kristina Orth-Gomér
Author Affiliation
Stressmottagningen, Institutet för psykosocial miljömedicin, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 May 2;99(18):2047-52
Date
May-2-2002
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
English Abstract
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Public Sector - manpower
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
This cross-sectional investigation aimed at assessing levels of emotional exhaustion among female employees within the Swedish public sector. Other aims were to study the associations between self-rated emotional exhaustion and psychosocial factors at work, as well as findings from medical examinations. Data was collected by means of questionnaires including the Maslach Burnout Inventory, among 183 women working in geriatric care and 143 employees at the National Social Insurance Office. We found high proportions of emotional exhaustion in both samples (geriatric care = 34%; Social Insurance Office = 26%). Participants with high scores for emotional exhaustion reported more job-strain, less social support at work and more somatic, emotional and cognitive complaints than those with low or intermediate scores. Medical examinations performed on 19 participants with low scores and 41 with high scores for emotional exhaustion revealed significantly more findings among participants with high emotional exhaustion, particularly fatigue, sleep disturbances and cognitive impairment. There were no group differences in terms of depression or other findings. This study shows that individuals at risk for stress-related disorders may be identified using simple questionnaires. Early interventions for stress in the workplace may prevent incapacitating conditions among a great proportion of women working in the public sector.
PubMed ID
12082783 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of cancer-related fatigue in the Swedish twin registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16714
Source
Cancer. 2005 Nov 1;104(9):2022-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2005
Author
Michael J Forlenza
Per Hall
Paul Lichtenstein
Birgitta Evengard
Patrick F Sullivan
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Cancer. 2005 Nov 1;104(9):2022-31
Date
Nov-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - psychology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Estimates of the prevalence of cancer-related fatigue (CRF) are wide, and data suggest that fatigue is more prevalent among cancer patients than among the general population. However, most studies examining the prevalence of CRF have been hospital-based or clinic-based studies, which often are subject to bias. METHODS: Point prevalence and prevalence odds ratios of fatigue were estimated using data from a large, population-based cohort that was screened for fatigue and linked with national registry-based data about cancer. Prevalence odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression with general estimating equations. RESULTS: Approximately 23% of cancer registrants reported abnormal fatigue in the previous 6 months, 19% reported abnormal fatigue that lasted for at least 1 month, 14% reported abnormal fatigue that lasted at least 6 months, and 11% reported abnormal fatigue that lasted at least 6 months and caused significant functional impairment. Individuals who were listed in the cancer registry within the last 5 years were more likely to report experiencing fatigue than individuals who were not listed. There was an elevated prevalence of fatigue among those who were registered with carcinomas of the lung, uterine cervix, colon-rectum, ovaries, and prostate. Both women and men who were listed recently in the cancer registry were more likely to experience any level of fatigue than the comparison group. However, a greater proportion of women experienced fatigue relative to men. CONCLUSIONS: A greater proportion of individuals who were listed in a national cancer registry reported experiencing fatigue compared with individuals in the general population.
PubMed ID
16206253 View in PubMed
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The epidemiology of chronic fatigue in the Swedish Twin Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51802
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Sep;35(9):1317-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Birgitta Evengård
Andreas Jacks
Nancy L Pedersen
Patrick F Sullivan
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Sep;35(9):1317-26
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) remains an idiopathic and controversial entity. METHOD: We screened 31405 individual members of the Swedish Twin Registry (aged 42-64 years) for the symptoms of fatiguing illness via a telephone questionnaire. We refined self-reported symptoms via data from several national registries and from physician review of all available medical records in order to approximate closely the dominant case definition of CFS. FINDINGS: The 6-month prevalence of CFS-like illness was 2.36% (95% CI 2.19-2.53) and was markedly higher in women than men, odds ratio 3.92 (95% CI 3.24-4.72) with no significant association with age or years of education. There was a highly significant association with occupation that disappeared after accounting for gender. INTERPRETATION: CFS-like illness may be more common that previously acknowledged. There is a marked increase in risk by gender. Previous reports that CFS is more prevalent in individuals in certain occupational categories were not confirmed and may have been due to confounding by gender.
PubMed ID
16168154 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in Swedish travellers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138116
Source
APMIS. 2011 Feb;119(2):88-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Ulf Bronner
Lillemor Karlsson
Birgitta Evengård
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Ulf.Bronner@karolinska.se
Source
APMIS. 2011 Feb;119(2):88-92
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnostic Tests, Routine
False Negative Reactions
Female
Humans
Infant
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase - blood
Malaria - diagnosis
Male
Microscopy
Middle Aged
Parasitemia - diagnosis
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Travel
Abstract
Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria have become valuable tools for the diagnosis of malaria in both endemic and non-endemic areas. During a 7-year period, first the MalaQuick rapid test and then the NOW Malaria test, were evaluated by well-trained laboratory technicians in a university hospital laboratory of parasitology. A total of 635 blood samples were selected from 4731 blood specimens obtained from travellers at the emergency department, at wards and at out-patient clinics. The samples were analysed by microscopy and RDT. Malaria parasites were detected in the blood films of 134 (21%) samples. The sensitivity of the RDT for Plasmodium falciparum was 97.7% (84 of 86 samples) with a negative predictive value of 99.6%. The two false-negative results were associated with low levels of parasitaemia. For non-falciparum species the sensitivity was only 58.3% (28 of 48 samples). Based on the excellent ability of the RDTs to detect P. falciparum infections, we recommend the use of the NOW Malaria test as a complement to microscopy in the laboratory.
PubMed ID
21208275 View in PubMed
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Facing the limit of resilience: perceptions of climate change among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130013
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 11-21.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
  1 document  
Author
Maria Furberg
Birgitta Evengård
Maria Nilsson
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 11-21.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
File Size
501926
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animal Husbandry - methods - trends
Animals
Climate change
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups - psychology
Reindeer
Seasons
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Young Adult
Sami
Perception
Abstract
The Arctic area is a part of the globe where the increase in global temperature has had the earliest noticeable effect and indigenous peoples, including the Swedish reindeer herding Sami, are amongst the first to be affected by these changes.
To explore the experiences and perceptions of climate change among Swedish reindeer herding Sami.
In-depth interviews with 14 Swedish reindeer herding Sami were performed, with purposive sampling. The interviews focused on the herders experiences of climate change, observed consequences and thoughts about this. The interviews were analysed using content analysis.
One core theme emerged from the interviews: facing the limit of resilience. Swedish reindeer-herding Sami perceive climate change as yet another stressor in their daily struggle. They have experienced severe and more rapidly shifting, unstable weather with associated changes in vegetation and alterations in the freeze-thaw cycle, all of which affect reindeer herding. The forecasts about climate change from authorities and scientists have contributed to stress and anxiety. Other societal developments have lead to decreased flexibility that obstructs adaptation. Some adaptive strategies are discordant with the traditional life of reindeer herding, and there is a fear among the Sami of being the last generation practising traditional reindeer herding.
The study illustrates the vulnerable situation of the reindeer herders and that climate change impact may have serious consequences for the trade and their overall way of life. Decision makers on all levels, both in Sweden and internationally, need improved insights into these complex issues to be able to make adequate decisions about adaptive climate change strategies.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2005 Jun;34(3):623-915737965
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
PubMed ID
22043218 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.