Skip header and navigation

Refine By

26 records – page 1 of 3.

Vulnerable populations: health of humans and animals in a changed landscape

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284385
Source
Pages 58-60 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):58-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
PLENARY SESSIONS CQ\C-~ION Vulnerable populations: health of humans and animals in a changed landscape Birgitta Evengard* Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, UMEA University Hospital, Umea, Sweden T he climate is changing. There have always been natural
  1 document  
Author
Birgitta Evengard
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, UMEA University Hospital, Umea, Sweden
Source
Pages 58-60 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):58-60
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
Less detail
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:3-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
noticed that their dogs are being infested by more ticks, year by year. Researchers from Russia describe, for example, a recent 50-fold increase in the prevalence of tick- borne encephalitis (TBE) in the northwestern part of the �INVITED EDITORIAL Global Health Action 2011. # 2011 Birgitta Evengard
  1 document  
Author
Birgitta Evengard
Anthony McMichael
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:3-5
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
192216
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Ecosystem
Global warming
Health status
Humans
Ice
Transition Temperature
Vulnerable Populations
Notes
Cites: J Intern Med. 2011 Nov;270(5):401-1321682780
Cites: Nature. 2009 Apr 30;458(7242):1158-6219407799
PubMed ID
22121341 View in PubMed
Documents

Evengard-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Facing the limit of resilience: perceptions of climate change among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130013
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 11-21.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
  1 document  
Author
Maria Furberg
Birgitta Evengård
Maria Nilsson
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 11-21.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
File Size
501926
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animal Husbandry - methods - trends
Animals
Climate change
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups - psychology
Reindeer
Seasons
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Young Adult
Sami
Perception
Abstract
The Arctic area is a part of the globe where the increase in global temperature has had the earliest noticeable effect and indigenous peoples, including the Swedish reindeer herding Sami, are amongst the first to be affected by these changes.
To explore the experiences and perceptions of climate change among Swedish reindeer herding Sami.
In-depth interviews with 14 Swedish reindeer herding Sami were performed, with purposive sampling. The interviews focused on the herders experiences of climate change, observed consequences and thoughts about this. The interviews were analysed using content analysis.
One core theme emerged from the interviews: facing the limit of resilience. Swedish reindeer-herding Sami perceive climate change as yet another stressor in their daily struggle. They have experienced severe and more rapidly shifting, unstable weather with associated changes in vegetation and alterations in the freeze-thaw cycle, all of which affect reindeer herding. The forecasts about climate change from authorities and scientists have contributed to stress and anxiety. Other societal developments have lead to decreased flexibility that obstructs adaptation. Some adaptive strategies are discordant with the traditional life of reindeer herding, and there is a fear among the Sami of being the last generation practising traditional reindeer herding.
The study illustrates the vulnerable situation of the reindeer herders and that climate change impact may have serious consequences for the trade and their overall way of life. Decision makers on all levels, both in Sweden and internationally, need improved insights into these complex issues to be able to make adequate decisions about adaptive climate change strategies.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2005 Jun;34(3):623-915737965
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
PubMed ID
22043218 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

Illness and risk behaviour in health care students studying abroad.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263653
Source
Med Educ. 2015 Jul;49(7):684-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Martin Angelin
Birgitta Evengård
Helena Palmgren
Source
Med Educ. 2015 Jul;49(7):684-91
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The numbers of university students studying abroad increase every year. These students are not tourists as their studies require different types of travel that expose them to different risks. Moreover, health care students (HCSs) may be exposed to even greater risks according to their travel destinations and itineraries. Clearly, research-based pre-travel advice is needed.
This study reports on a prospective survey conducted from April 2010 to January 2014 of health care and non-health care students from Swedish universities in Umeå, Stockholm and Gothenburg studying abroad.
Of the 393 students included in the study, 85% responded. Over half (55%) were HCSs. Pre-travel health information was received by 79% and information on personal safety by 49% of HCSs. The rate of illness during travel was 52%. Health care students more often travelled to developing regions and were at increased risk for travellers' diarrhoea. One in 10 experienced theft and 3% were involved in traffic accidents. One in five met a new sexual partner during travel and 65% of these practised safe sex. Half of all participants increased their alcohol consumption while abroad; high alcohol consumption was associated with increased risk for being a victim of theft, as well as for meeting a new sexual partner during travel.
University authorities are responsible for the safety and well-being of students studying abroad. This study supplies organisers and students with epidemiological data that will help improve pre-travel preparation and increase student awareness of the potential risks associated with studying abroad.
PubMed ID
26077216 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in Swedish travellers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138116
Source
APMIS. 2011 Feb;119(2):88-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Ulf Bronner
Lillemor Karlsson
Birgitta Evengård
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Ulf.Bronner@karolinska.se
Source
APMIS. 2011 Feb;119(2):88-92
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnostic Tests, Routine
False Negative Reactions
Female
Humans
Infant
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase - blood
Malaria - diagnosis
Male
Microscopy
Middle Aged
Parasitemia - diagnosis
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Travel
Abstract
Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria have become valuable tools for the diagnosis of malaria in both endemic and non-endemic areas. During a 7-year period, first the MalaQuick rapid test and then the NOW Malaria test, were evaluated by well-trained laboratory technicians in a university hospital laboratory of parasitology. A total of 635 blood samples were selected from 4731 blood specimens obtained from travellers at the emergency department, at wards and at out-patient clinics. The samples were analysed by microscopy and RDT. Malaria parasites were detected in the blood films of 134 (21%) samples. The sensitivity of the RDT for Plasmodium falciparum was 97.7% (84 of 86 samples) with a negative predictive value of 99.6%. The two false-negative results were associated with low levels of parasitaemia. For non-falciparum species the sensitivity was only 58.3% (28 of 48 samples). Based on the excellent ability of the RDTs to detect P. falciparum infections, we recommend the use of the NOW Malaria test as a complement to microscopy in the laboratory.
PubMed ID
21208275 View in PubMed
Less detail

Travel and vaccination patterns: a report from a travel medicine clinic in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134445
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2011 Sep;43(9):714-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Martin Angelin
Birgitta Evengård
Helena Palmgren
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. martin.angelin@climi.umu.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2011 Sep;43(9):714-20
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Travel Medicine
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Travel Medicine Clinic in Umeå is one of Sweden's largest public providers of vaccination and counselling prior to international travel. During the study period it was the only travel medicine clinic in Umeå. This study describes the demography of the visitors to the clinic and travel destinations and durations, as well as vaccinations administered.
This was a retrospective study for the period January 2005 to April 2008 based on pre-travel consultation questionnaires and on vaccine expenditure data. A 10% sample of 16,735 first visits prior to international travel was consecutively selected according to the chronology of the visits.
Data on 1698 travellers were included in the study. Thailand was the most common destination among visitors, accounting for one third of all destinations. Medical problems affecting pre-travel health planning were rare. Four out of 5 visitors (79%) received only 1 vaccination, mainly for hepatitis A. Travellers to Thailand more often sought travel health advice compared to travellers to Turkey, despite the fact that the 2 destinations were almost equally distributed among travellers from Umeå. We found differences between men and women in money spent on vaccines and in particular in vaccination against Japanese encephalitis.
To assess the optimal vaccination level at a travel medicine clinic is difficult. Decisions are affected by general recommendations and the risk perception of the travel medicine practitioner, as well as the risk perception of the traveller. The sex difference found in this study might be due to gender differences in risk perception and should be further investigated.
PubMed ID
21585242 View in PubMed
Less detail

Travel health advice: benefits, compliance, and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260855
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;46(6):447-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Martin Angelin
Birgitta Evengård
Helena Palmgren
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;46(6):447-53
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Sweden
Travel Medicine
Young Adult
Abstract
Travel health advice is an important and difficult part of a pre-travel consultation. The aim of this study was to determine whether the travel health advice given is followed by the traveller and whether it affects disease and injury experienced during travel.
A prospective survey study was carried out from October 2009 to April 2012 at the Travel Medicine Clinic of the Department of Infectious Diseases, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. The Travel Medicine Clinic in Umeå is the largest travel clinic in northern Sweden.
We included 1277 individuals in the study; 1059 (83%) responded to the post-travel questionnaire. Most visitors (88%) remembered having received travel health advice; among these, 95% found some of the health advice useful. Two-thirds (67%) claimed to have followed the advice, but fell ill during travel to the same extent as those who did not. Younger travellers (
PubMed ID
24694214 View in PubMed
Less detail

The influence of seasonal climate variability on mortality in pre-industrial Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114952
Source
Glob Health Action. 2013;6:20153
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Barbara Schumann
Sören Edvinsson
Birgitta Evengård
Joacim Rocklöv
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå Centre for Global Health Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. barbara.schumann@epiph.umu.se
Source
Glob Health Action. 2013;6:20153
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Mortality - history - trends
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Weather
Abstract
Recent studies have shown an association between weather and climatic factors with mortality, cardiovascular and infectious diseases. We used historical data to investigate the impact of seasonal temperature and precipitation on total mortality in Uppsala, Sweden, during the first two stages of the demographic transition, 1749-1859.
We retrieved mortality and population numbers of the Uppsala Domkyrka parish from digitised parish records and obtained monthly temperature and precipitation measures recorded in Uppsala during that time. Statistical models were established for year-to-year variability in deaths by annual and seasonal temperature and precipitation, adjusting for longer time trends. In a second step, a model was established for three different periods to study changes in the association of climate variability and mortality over time. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.
Precipitation during spring and autumn was significantly associated with annual mortality (spring RR 0.982, CI 0.965-1.000; autumn RR 1.018, CI 1.004-1.032, respectively, per centimetre increase of precipitation). Higher springtime temperature decreased annual mortality, while higher summer temperature increased the death toll; however, both were only borderline significant (p=0.07). The significant effect of springtime precipitation for mortality was present only in the first two periods (1749-1785 and 1786-1824). On the contrary, the overall effect of autumn precipitation was mainly due to its relevance during the last period, 1825-1859 (RR 1.024, CI 0.997-1.052). At that time, higher winter precipitation was found to decrease mortality.
In urban Uppsala, during the 18th and 19th century, precipitation appeared to be a stronger predictor for mortality than temperature. Higher spring precipitation decreased and higher autumn precipitation increased the number of deaths. However, this association differed before and during the early stages of industrialisation. Further research shall take age-specific differences into account, as well as changes in socio-economic conditions during that time.
Notes
Cites: Milbank Mem Fund Q. 1971 Oct;49(4):509-385155251
Cites: Soc Hist Med. 1992 Apr;5(1):71-9411612777
Cites: Popul Stud (Camb). 2005 Nov;59(3):321-3716249153
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):523-3316440614
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2007 Jul;80(7):615-2617468879
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Mar 27;109(13):4730-722315419
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2010 Jun;7(6):2607-1920644691
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2011 Apr;84(4):361-920957489
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:28921569269
Cites: Environ Res. 2012 Jan;112:218-2422226140
Cites: Zoonoses Public Health. 2009 Apr;56(3):150-618771520
PubMed ID
23561027 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The laundry-basket project--gender differences to the very skin. Different treatment of some common skin diseases in men and women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51792
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Oct 3-9;102(40):2846-8, 2850-1
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ingrid Osika
Birgitta Evengård
Lena Waernulf
Filippa Nyberg
Author Affiliation
Linköpings universitet, Linköping.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Oct 3-9;102(40):2846-8, 2850-1
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Dermatologic Agents - administration & dosage - economics
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Eczema - drug therapy - economics
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Humans
Male
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - economics - statistics & numerical data
PUVA Therapy - economics - utilization
Physician's Practice Patterns - economics - statistics & numerical data
Prejudice
Prescriptions, Drug - economics - statistics & numerical data
Psoriasis - drug therapy - economics
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
In this study, we have analysed the treatment traditions in a dermatological outpatient clinic, from a gender perspective. Eczema and psoriasis were of similar frequency in male and female patients, while a higher number of female patients had eczema of the hands. Ultraviolet light (UV) treatment was given to a higher number of male patients in all diagnostic groups including eczema of the hands. In addition, a higher number of given treatments was given to the male patients than to the female patients. As for prescriptions to male and female patients from our department and in Stockholm county (1.8 mill.), a much larger amount of preparations for local treatment was received by female patients, especially emollients. Male patients had received more of calcipotriol creme in addition to their being treated more intensively at the clinic. In a sub-group analysis on patients with psoriasis vulgaris on our clinic and in a patient cooperation-based treatment department, we found the same relation between male and female treatment as in the larger group. On follow-up, the number of female patients with psoriasis who were given treatment at our clinic had increased, but the number of treatments given to men was still higher than for female patients. An economic analysis of these findings show a great overweight of clinic-based treatment costs for male patients, while female patients receive emollients for self-care to a greater extent. We conclude that more studies are needed to clarify the basis of these findings.
PubMed ID
16255359 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic fatigue in a population sample: definitions and heterogeneity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172843
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Sep;35(9):1337-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Patrick F Sullivan
Nancy L Pedersen
Andreas Jacks
Birgitta Evengård
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7264, USA. pfsulliv@med.unc.edu
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Sep;35(9):1337-48
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diagnosis, Differential
Epidemiologic Studies
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries - standards - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
Twin Studies as Topic
Abstract
Numerous nosological decisions are made when moving from the common human symptom of unusual fatigue to the rare chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). These decisions have infrequently been subjected to rigorous evaluation.
We obtained telephone interview data on fatiguing symptoms from 31406 individuals twins in the Swedish Twin Registry aged 42-64 years; 5330 subjects who endorsed fatigue and possessed no exclusionary condition formed the analytic group. We evaluated the definition and classification of CFS-like illness using graphical methods, regression models, and latent class analysis.
Our results raise fundamental questions about the 1994 Centers for Disease Control criteria as (1) there was no empirical support for the requirement of four of eight cardinal CFS symptoms; (2) these eight symptoms were not equivalent in their capacity to predict fatigue; and (3) no combination of symptoms was markedly more heritable. Critically, latent class analysis identified a syndrome strongly resembling CFS-like illness.
Our data are consistent with the 'existence' of CFS-like illness although the dominant nosological approach captures population-level variation poorly. We suggest that studying a more parsimonious case definition - impairing chronic fatigue not due to a known cause - would represent a way forward.
PubMed ID
16168156 View in PubMed
Less detail

26 records – page 1 of 3.