Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

The epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104423
Source
Arthritis Rheumatol. 2014 Apr;66(4):786-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Jessica Widdifield
J Michael Paterson
Sasha Bernatsky
Karen Tu
George Tomlinson
Bindee Kuriya
J Carter Thorne
Claire Bombardier
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto and Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Arthritis Rheumatol. 2014 Apr;66(4):786-93
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Abstract
Epidemiologic assessments of sufficiently large populations are required in order to obtain robust estimates of disease prevalence and incidence, particularly when exploring the influence of various factors (age, sex, calendar time). We undertook this study to describe the epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over the past 15 years.
We used the Ontario Rheumatoid Arthritis administrative Database (ORAD), a validated population-based research database of all Ontarians with RA. The ORAD records were linked with census data to calculate crude and age and sex-standardized prevalence and incidence rates from 1996 to 2010. Vital statistics were used to estimate annual all-cause mortality during the study period.
As of 2010, there were 97,499 Ontarians with RA, corresponding to a cumulative prevalence of 0.9%. Age and sex-standardized RA prevalence increased steadily over time from 473 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 469-478) per 100,000 population (0.49%) in 1996 to 784 (95% CI 779-789) per 100,000 population (0.9%) in 2010. Age and sex-standardized incidence per 100,000 population ranged from 62 (95% CI 60-63) in 1996 to 54 (95% CI 52-55) in 2010. All-cause mortality decreased by a relative 21.4% since 1996.
Over a 15-year period, we observed an increase in RA prevalence over time. This rise may be attributed to the increasing time to ascertain cases (which may have been latent in the population during earlier years of the study), increasing survival, and/or an increase in the aging background population. Incidence appears to be stable.
PubMed ID
24757131 View in PubMed
Less detail

Use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and risk of preeclampsia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119332
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Nov;64(11):1730-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Kristin Palmsten
Sonia Hernández-Díaz
Bindee Kuriya
Daniel H Solomon
Soko Setoguchi
Author Affiliation
Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. kpalmste@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Nov;64(11):1730-8
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Autoimmune Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Incidence
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - drug therapy - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe patterns of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) use during pregnancy in a population-based cohort, and to evaluate the association between autoimmune disease, DMARDs, corticosteroids, and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and preeclampsia.
Using health care utilization databases from British Columbia (1997-2006), we compared the risk for preeclampsia among 44,786 women with and without autoimmune disease with study drug dispensings before pregnancy (past users) and before and during the first 20 gestational weeks (continuous users). Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated.
Only 414 women (0.1%) had a DMARD dispensing during pregnancy. The incidence of preeclampsia was 2.3% for past DMARD users, 2.7% for past corticosteroid users, and 2.9% for past NSAID users. Compared to past users, the continuous DMARD user RR was 2.29 (95% CI 0.81-6.44), and was 0.89 (95% CI 0.51-1.56) for corticosteroid and 0.84 (95% CI 0.63-1.10) for NSAID users. Compared to women without autoimmune disease, the delivery year-adjusted RR was 2.02 (95% CI 1.11-3.64) for women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The DMARD results were attenuated when antimalarials were excluded, and the delivery year-adjusted RR was 0.95 (95% CI 0.25-3.55) when the DMARD analysis was restricted to women with autoimmune disease.
Few women were exposed to DMARDs during pregnancy. We observed a 2-fold increased risk of preeclampsia among women with SLE and a nonsignificant increase in risk in DMARD users. The DMARD and preeclampsia association was attenuated when antimalarials were excluded and null when restricted to women with autoimmune disease, which suggests the association is likely due to greater autoimmune disease severity in DMARD users.
Notes
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2010 Jan;69 Suppl 1:i65-6619995748
Cites: Neurology. 2009 Dec 1;73(22):1831-619923552
Cites: Am J Reprod Immunol. 2010 Jun;63(6):534-4320331588
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2011 Feb;70(2):315-921068104
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2011 May;63(5):721-821557526
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2011 Mar;63(3):342-5021120967
Cites: Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2012 Apr;42(2):145-5321221847
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2013 Jan;22(1):16-2422550030
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Jun;79(6):490-510857874
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Nov 1;154(9):854-6411682368
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Feb 1;155(3):203-911821244
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2002 Feb;46(2):328-4611840435
Cites: Hypertension. 2003 Mar;41(3):437-4512623940
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Apr 1;159(7):702-615033648
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Jun;103(6):1190-315172851
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Jun;190(6):1629-33; discussion 1633-415284758
Cites: Biometrics. 1986 Mar;42(1):121-303719049
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(3):197-2072220340
Cites: Epidemiology. 1995 Jul;6(4):391-57548347
Cites: Am J Perinatol. 1997 Jan;14(1):17-239259891
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Jun 1;147(11):1062-709620050
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Mar 12;330(7491):56515743856
Cites: Science. 2005 Jun 10;308(5728):1592-415947178
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2005 Sep;32(9):1679-8716142860
Cites: Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2005 Oct;56(1):23-4616039869
Cites: Oncologist. 2006 Feb;11(2):111-2516476832
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2006 Mar;54(3):899-90716508972
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Apr;194(4):992-100116580288
Cites: Reprod Biomed Online. 2006 Nov;13(5):680-617169180
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2007 Apr;34(4):696-70517299838
Cites: Lancet. 2007 May 26;369(9575):1791-817512048
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2007 Oct;133(4):1106-1217764676
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Mar 15;167(6):633-4018194999
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2008 May;21(5):521-618437143
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:7918402681
Cites: BMJ. 2008;337:a42718599468
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Aug;199(2):127.e1-618456233
Cites: Hypertens Pregnancy. 2008;27(3):253-6518696354
Cites: J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2008 Sep;17(7):1073-8018774892
Cites: Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Apr;38(5):396-40218336875
Cites: BMJ. 2009;338:b225519541696
Cites: Nat Rev Rheumatol. 2009 Jul;5(7):382-9019506586
Cites: Hum Reprod Update. 2009 Sep-Oct;15(5):517-3519279047
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Nov;60(11):3196-20619877045
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2010 Apr;69(4):715-719406733
PubMed ID
23111855 View in PubMed
Less detail