Skip header and navigation

Refine By

33 records – page 1 of 4.

Antibody kinetics among 8-10 years old respondents to hepatitis B vaccination in a low endemic country and the effect of a booster dose given 5 or 10 years later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149103
Source
Vaccine. 2009 Oct 9;27(43):6048-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-2009
Author
Vladimir Gilca
Gaston De Serres
Nicole Boulianne
Philippe De Wals
Donald Murphy
Gisele Trudeau
Richard Massé
Bernard Duval
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Laval University, Quebec, Canada. vladimir.gilca@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2009 Oct 9;27(43):6048-53
Date
Oct-9-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - immunology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood - immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Kinetics
Male
Quebec
Young Adult
Abstract
Few data are available concerning the persistence of anti-HBs and the effect of booster doses given several years post-vaccination against hepatitis B during preadolescence. The objective of this open-labelled clinical trial was to evaluate the persistence of antibodies after vaccination with three paediatric doses of Engerix-B at the age of 8-10 years and the effect of a booster dose given 5 (Group Y5) or 10 (Group Y10) years later. Anti-HBs were measured before and one month post-primary vaccination, then 5 and 10 years later, before the booster dose, as well as one month and 1 year post-booster. The anamnestic response was defined as a >or=fourfold increase of anti-HBs post-booster (>or=10 IU/L) when compared to pre-booster. Ten years post-primary vaccination, 559 of the 652 initially randomized subjects (86%) were eligible for analysis. Group Y5, 5 years post-booster results: 99% of subjects had detectable levels of antibodies and 96% a titer >or=10 IU/L. The anti-HBs GMTs decreased from 114,489 IU/L one month post-booster to 3354 IU/L 5 years later. Group Y10 results: 10 years post-primary vaccination 96% of subjects had a detectable level of anti-HBs and 85% were above the threshold of 10 IU/L. The GMTs one month post-booster were 31,030 IU/L. The challenge with a booster demonstrated an anamnestic response in 99% of subjects in group Y5 and 100% of subjects in group Y10. All subjects were anti-HBc negative. The booster doses were well tolerated. The excellent anamnestic response observed after the booster dose demonstrates the persistence of immunity in virtually all young adults vaccinated at the age of 8-10 with three paediatric doses of Engerix-B.
PubMed ID
19683086 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bats in the bedroom, bats in the belfry: reanalysis of the rationale for rabies postexposure prophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151279
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Jun 1;48(11):1493-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2009
Author
Gaston De Serres
Danuta M Skowronski
Pierre Mimault
Manale Ouakki
Renée Maranda-Aubut
Bernard Duval
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Laval University, Québec, Canada. gaston.deserres@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Jun 1;48(11):1493-9
Date
Jun-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Chiroptera
Humans
Incidence
Rabies - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
United States - epidemiology
Zoonoses - transmission
Abstract
We assessed the scientific basis and practical implications of recommendations made since the late 1990s to offer rabies postexposure prophylaxis (RPEP) for occult bat encounters, including recommendations to offer RPEP to persons with bedroom exposure to a bat while sleeping without evidence of direct physical contact.
The number needed to treat after bedroom exposure to a bat was calculated as the percentage of population exposed multiplied by the inverse of crude rabies incidence. Bedroom exposure was estimated in a population survey of 14,453 households. Incidence was based on reported human cases in Canada and the United States, 1990-2007.
In the population surveyed, bedroom bat exposure while sleeping and without known physical contact occurred at an annual rate of 0.099%. We estimate that
PubMed ID
19400689 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian Association for Immunization Research and Evaluation (CAIRE) guidelines for industry-sponsored clinical trial and epidemiology contract research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167238
Source
Hum Vaccin. 2005 Jul-Aug;1(4):140-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Scott A Halperin
David Scheifele
Bernard Duval
Barbara Law
Brian Ward
Gordean Bjornson
Beth Halperin
Danuta Skowronski
Arlene King
Greg Hammond
Simon Dobson
Susan Tamblyn
Elaine Wang
Pierre Lavigne
Lisa Danzig
Donald Elrick
Elspeth Carnan
James Mansi
Francoise Bertrand
Laszlo Palkonyay
Gail Clements
Neil Maresky
David Wortzman
Author Affiliation
CAIRE Research Sponsor Advisory Board, Halifax, Nova Scotia. scott.halperin@dal.ca
Source
Hum Vaccin. 2005 Jul-Aug;1(4):140-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Clinical Trials as Topic - standards
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Drug Industry - standards
Humans
Immunization - standards
Publications
Research - standards
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
In response to concerns about interactions of academic and public health investigators with industry, the Canadian Association for Immunization Research and Evaluation (CAIRE), in collaboration with six major vaccine manufacturers, developed guidelines for participation in industry-sponsored clinical trial and epidemiology contract research within Canada. Topics addressed include definition of investigators, data ownership, protocol development, data management, data analysis, producing a study report and publication of the results of the study.
PubMed ID
17012864 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cervical cancer prevention by vaccination: nurses' knowledge, attitudes and intentions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152587
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Mar;65(3):499-508
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Bernard Duval
Vladimir Gilca
Nicole Boulianne
Karen Pielak
Beth Halperin
Mary Anne Simpson
Chantal Sauvageau
Manale Ouakki
Eve Dube
France Lavoie
Author Affiliation
Quebec National Public Health Institute, Canada.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Mar;65(3):499-508
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - prevention & control
Child
Early Detection of Cancer
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Nurses - psychology
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Questionnaires
Vaccination - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper is a report of a survey: (1) to document nurses' knowledge, attitudes and information needs regarding human papillomavirus prevention and (2) to determine factors associated with their willingness to recommend human papillomavirus vaccines.
Persistent infection with human papillomavirus has been causally linked to cervical cancer. Two human papillomavirus vaccines have recently been approved for use in more than 65 countries. Nurses' level of support for the prevention of human papillomavirus related diseases by vaccination has not been researched.
A survey was conducted in 2007. Self-administered questionnaires were mailed to 1799 randomly selected nurses. Descriptive statistics were generated for all variables. Multivariable logistic regression models were estimated to determine variables associated with the willingness to recommend human papillomavirus vaccines.
A total of 946 questionnaires were analyzed and showed that: 97% of nurses perceived routinely recommended vaccines as very useful; 93% would support human papillomavirus vaccination if it is publicly funded; 85% would recommend human papillomavirus vaccines to their patients; 33%, 46% and 61% expect the vaccination to permit screening to begin later in life, reduction of the frequency of screening, and reduction of the number of postscreening interventions, respectively. Respondents' knowledge score was 3.8 out of 7. Several modifiable factors, including knowledge, perceived self-efficacy, and societal and colleagues support were associated with willingness to recommend vaccines.
Most nurses' support human papillomavirus vaccination, but their active involvement should not be taken for granted. Targeted educational efforts are needed to ensure nurses' involvement in the prevention of human papillomavirus-related diseases.
Notes
Comment In: J Adv Nurs. 2009 Mar;65(3):46319222643
PubMed ID
19222647 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cohort effects in dynamic models and their impact on vaccination programmes: an example from hepatitis A.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166240
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2006;6:174
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Arni S R Srinivasa Rao
Maggie H Chen
Ba' Z Pham
Andrea C Tricco
Vladimir Gilca
Bernard Duval
Murray D Krahn
Chris T Bauch
Author Affiliation
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada. arni@maths.ox.ac.uk
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2006;6:174
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Effect
Cohort Studies
Hepatitis A - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis A Vaccines
Humans
Immunization Programs
Incidence
Infant
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Travel
Abstract
Infection rates for many infectious diseases have declined over the past century. This has created a cohort effect, whereby older individuals experienced a higher infection rate in their past than younger individuals do now. As a result, age-stratified seroprevalence profiles often differ from what would be expected from constant infection rates.
Here, we account for the cohort effect by fitting an age-structured compartmental model with declining transmission rates to Hepatitis A seroprevalence data for Canadian-born individuals. We compare the predicted impact of universal vaccination with and without including the cohort effect in the dynamic model.
We find that Hepatitis A transmissibility has declined by a factor of 2.8 since the early twentieth century. When the cohort effect is not included in the model, incidence and mortality both with and without vaccination are significantly over-predicted. Incidence (respectively mortality) over a 20 year period of universal vaccination is 34% (respectively 90%) higher than if the cohort effect is included. The percentage reduction in incidence and mortality due to vaccination are also over-predicted when the cohort effect is not included. Similar effects are likely for many other infectious diseases where infection rates have declined significantly over past decades and where immunity is lifelong.
Failure to account for cohort effects has implications for interpreting seroprevalence data and predicting the impact of vaccination programmes with dynamic models. Cohort effects should be included in dynamic modelling studies whenever applicable.
Notes
Cites: MMWR Recomm Rep. 1999 Oct 1;48(RR-12):1-3710543657
Cites: Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1999 Nov;61(5):825-910586919
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Apr;124(2):279-8710813154
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2000 Aug;154(8):763-7010922271
Cites: Pediatrics. 2000 Oct;106(4):E5411015549
Cites: Can Commun Dis Rep. 2000 Oct 1;26(19):157-6111057007
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 2001 Jan;14(1):38-5811148002
Cites: Can Commun Dis Rep. 2001 Nov 1;27(21):177-8011709890
Cites: J Travel Med. 2002 Jan-Feb;9(1):10-611962352
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 May;109(5):839-4511986444
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93(6):435-812448866
Cites: Vaccine. 2003 Jun 2;21(19-20):2238-4112744849
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2003 Aug 7;270(1524):1573-812908977
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Jan 29;350(5):476-8114749456
Cites: J Med Virol. 2004 Apr;72(4):538-4414981755
Cites: Am J Nurs. 2004 Mar;104(3):27-815108565
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2004 Jun;23(6):551-215194837
Cites: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Jul;25(7):563-915301028
Cites: Vaccine. 2004 Oct 22;22(31-32):4342-5015474727
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1980 May 29;302(22):1222-76245363
Cites: Sex Transm Dis. 1980 Apr-Jun;7(2):87-96893088
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Jul 13;294(2):194-20116014593
Cites: Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2005 Feb;6(2):157-6415757414
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2005 Jun;34(3):600-915831565
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2005;5:5616001978
Cites: J Math Biol. 2005 Oct;51(4):389-40215940541
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2006 Dec;25(12):1184-617133168
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1980 Oct;112(4):471-817424896
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1983 May 15;128(10):1195-76301669
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1983 Oct;73(10):1190-36614273
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1985 Aug;122(2):226-333860002
Cites: Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1989 Nov 11;15(45):225-82582526
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1990 Jun;131(6):1085-932343861
Cites: Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1991 Sep 14;17(37):201-41742805
Cites: Medicine (Baltimore). 1992 Jan;71(1):14-231312659
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1992 Aug 13;327(7):453-71320740
Cites: Vaccine. 1992;10 Suppl 1:S56-81335660
Cites: JAMA. 1994 May 4;271(17):1328-348158817
Cites: J Hepatol. 1994 Jul;21(1):118-217963411
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1995 Mar;171 Suppl 1:S19-237876642
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 1995 Apr;114(2):319-447705494
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1997 Dec;176(6):1610-39395375
Cites: Can Commun Dis Rep. 1997 Nov 1;23(21):161-69397602
Cites: Can Commun Dis Rep. 1998 Sep 15;24(18):145-519780447
Cites: Nature. 2005 Jan 27;433(7024):417-2115674292
PubMed ID
17147828 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparative long term immunogenicity of two recombinant hepatitis B vaccines and the effect of a booster dose given after five years in a low endemicity country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175878
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Mar;24(3):213-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Bernard Duval
Vladimir Gîlca
Nicole Boulianne
Philippe De Wals
Richard Massé
Gisele Trudeau
Gaston De Serres
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Québec, Canada. bernard.duval@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Mar;24(3):213-8
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Child
Cohort Studies
Endemic Diseases
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - analysis - immunology
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Humans
Immunity - physiology
Immunization Schedule
Immunization, Secondary
Immunologic Memory
Incidence
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Vaccination - standards - trends
Vaccines, Synthetic - administration & dosage
Abstract
Few data are available concerning the long term immunogenicity of the pediatric doses of hepatitis B vaccines given to preteenagers. The long term effect of the booster dose in teenagers is unknown. We evaluated the immunogenicity of 2 pediatric hepatitis vaccines after primary vaccination and after a booster dose.
A prospective 15-year follow-up study of the immunogenicity of 2 hepatitis B vaccines was initiated in 1995 in Quebec City, Canada. One year apart, 1129 children 8-10 years old received Engerix-B 10 microg (EB), and 1126 received Recombivax-HB 2.5 microg (RB) vaccine after a 0-, 1-, 6-month schedule. After 5 years, one-third of the 2 cohorts were randomly selected. A booster dose of EB 10 microg or RB 5 microg was administered according to the vaccine used in the primary immunization. Antibodies were measured before, 1 month after and 1 year after the booster injection.
Before the booster dose, anti-HB surface antibody (HBs) was detected in 94.7% of the EB subjects and in 95.2% of the RB subjects (P = 0.85). The geometric mean titer (GMT) was higher in the EB than in the RB group (252 mIU/mL versus 66 mIU/mL, P or =10 mIU/mL. The anti-HBs GMT was 113,201 mIU/mL in the EB and 16,623 mIU/mL in the RB groups (P or =10 mIU/mL. The anti-HBs GMT was 14,028 mIU/mL in the EB and 3437 mIU/mL in the RB group (P
PubMed ID
15750456 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Nov 22;173(11):1358-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-22-2005
Author
Scott A Halperin
David Scheifele
Bernard Duval
Brian Ward
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Nov 22;173(11):1358-9
Date
Nov-22-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Conflict of Interest
Disclosure
Drug Industry
Editorial Policies
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Publishing
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 May 26;352(21):2160-215917381
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 May 26;352(21):2202-1015917385
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Sep 18;165(6):786-811584570
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Oct 24;347(17):1335-4112397192
Cites: Hum Vaccin. 2005 Jul-Aug;1(4):140-217012864
Comment On: CMAJ. 2001 Sep 18;165(6):786-811584570
PubMed ID
16301708 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cost-effectiveness analyses of hepatitis A vaccine: a systematic review to explore the effect of methodological quality on the economic attractiveness of vaccination strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159751
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 2008;26(1):17-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Andrea M Anonychuk
Andrea C Tricco
Chris T Bauch
Ba' Pham
Vladimir Gilca
Bernard Duval
Ava John-Baptiste
Gloria Woo
Murray Krahn
Author Affiliation
Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 2008;26(1):17-32
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Hepatitis A - prevention & control
Hepatitis A Vaccines - economics - therapeutic use
Hepatitis Antibodies - analysis
Hepatovirus - immunology
Humans
Mass Vaccination - economics
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Abstract
Hepatitis A vaccines have been available for more than a decade. Because the burden of hepatitis A virus has fallen in developed countries, the appropriate role of vaccination programmes, especially universal vaccination strategies, remains unclear. Cost-effectiveness analysis is a useful method of relating the costs of vaccination to its benefits, and may inform policy. This article systematically reviews the evidence on the cost effectiveness of hepatitis A vaccination in varying populations, and explores the effects of methodological quality and key modelling issues on the cost-effectiveness ratios.Cost-effectiveness/cost-utility studies of hepatitis A vaccine were identified via a series of literature searches (MEDLINE, EMBASE, HSTAR and SSCI). Citations and full-text articles were reviewed independently by two reviewers. Reference searching, author searches and expert consultation ensured literature saturation. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were abstracted for base-case analyses, converted to $US, year 2005 values, and categorised to reflect various levels of cost effectiveness. Quality of reporting, methodological issues and key modelling issues were assessed using frameworks published in the literature.Thirty-one cost-effectiveness studies (including 12 cost-utility analyses) were included from full-text article review (n = 58) and citation screening (n = 570). These studies evaluated universal mass vaccination (n = 14), targeted vaccination (n = 17) and vaccination of susceptibles (i.e. individuals initially screened for antibody and, if susceptible, vaccinated) [n = 13]. For universal vaccination, 50% of the ICERs were
PubMed ID
18088156 View in PubMed
Less detail

The cost of preventing rabies at any cost: post-exposure prophylaxis for occult bat contact.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156319
Source
Vaccine. 2008 Aug 18;26(35):4446-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-18-2008
Author
Caroline Huot
Gaston De Serres
Bernard Duval
Renée Maranda-Aubut
Manale Ouakki
Danuta M Skowronski
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Vaccine. 2008 Aug 18;26(35):4446-50
Date
Aug-18-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Chiroptera
Female
Humans
Immunization Programs - economics
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Rabies - prevention & control - transmission
Rabies Vaccines - administration & dosage - economics
Zoonoses - transmission
Abstract
Investigations conducted by public health in Quebec, Canada, following report of human exposure to a bat were reviewed to evaluate the implementation of the recommendation for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (RPEP) for household bat exposure (without documented direct contact). Of all RPEP recommended, 12% was for direct bat contact with bite, 7% for direct bat contact without known bite and 81% for household exposure. When bat was not available for testing, RPEP was almost always recommended. Household bat exposure has become the most frequent reason for RPEP administration. Given the rarity of rabies, RPEP recommendations related to household bat exposure may warrant review.
PubMed ID
18602958 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effectiveness of serogroup C meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine: results from a case-control study in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175564
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 15;40(8):1116-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2005
Author
Philippe De Wals
Geneviève Deceuninck
Gaston De Serres
Jean-François Boivin
Bernard Duval
Robert Remis
Richard Massé
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Quebec, Canada. Philippe.De.Wals@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 15;40(8):1116-22
Date
Apr-15-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Immunization Programs
Infant
Male
Meningococcal Infections - immunology - prevention & control
Meningococcal Vaccines - immunology
Odds Ratio
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - immunology
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
After a mass-immunization campaign in the province of Quebec, Canada, from 1992 to 1993, a case-control study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the polysaccharide vaccine, while controlling for the potential confounding effects of selected risk factors for serogroup C meningococcal disease.
The case patient group comprised 74 individuals with confirmed serogroup C meningococcal disease reported after the beginning of the campaign until 31 March 1998. Four control subjects, matched for age and place of residence, were randomly selected from the Quebec health insurance registry. Information on case patients was obtained from regional public health departments. Case patients and control subjects (or a family member) were interviewed by telephone. The analyses were conducted by using conditional logistic regression models.
Although the 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were large as a result of the small sample sizes, a high level of protection was found among children aged >or=6 years, during the first 2 years after vaccination (vaccine effectiveness, 95%; 95% CI, 68%-99%; P
PubMed ID
15791510 View in PubMed
Less detail

33 records – page 1 of 4.