Skip header and navigation

Refine By

62 records – page 2 of 7.

Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289285
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32798
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Berit Schei
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Tore Sørlie
Nils Fleten
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Use (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF, Karasjok, Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32798
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Chronic Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental health
Norway
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population.
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences.
The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence.
Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity.
Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.
Notes
Cites: J Psychol. 2001 Jan;135(1):17-36 PMID 11235837
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Feb 22;11(2):e0150330 PMID 26901867
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2009 Nov;29(7):647-57 PMID 19733950
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 2014 Oct;107(4):751-64 PMID 25111305
Cites: Pain Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;6(1):72-9 PMID 15669952
Cites: J Occup Rehabil. 2015 Sep;25(3):648-57 PMID 25693781
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):97-113 PMID 18468262
Cites: J Pain. 2011 May;12(5):511-22 PMID 21330217
Cites: Gend Med. 2011 Apr;8(2):69-79 PMID 21536226
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Apr;66(2):113-28 PMID 17515251
Cites: Headache. 2010 Oct;50(9):1473-81 PMID 20958295
Cites: Pain Med. 2010 Apr;11(4):482-91 PMID 20002592
Cites: Child Abuse Negl. 2007 May;31(5):531-47 PMID 17537506
Cites: Scand J Psychol. 2004 Feb;45(1):67-78 PMID 15016281
Cites: Fam Process. 2003 Spring;42(1):151-64 PMID 12698605
Cites: Clin J Pain. 2005 Sep-Oct;21(5):374-7 PMID 16093742
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Jun 18;14:617 PMID 24939210
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2003 Dec;13(4):361-6 PMID 14703325
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jan 3;373(9657):68-81 PMID 19056114
Cites: Anthropol Anz. 1997 Dec;55(3-4):281-7 PMID 9468755
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;18(3):154-63 PMID 19129965
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2004 Feb;13(1):8-18 PMID 14991427
Cites: Clin J Pain. 2014 Aug;30(8):713-23 PMID 24042349
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 2013 Jul;111(1):13-8 PMID 23794640
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Feb 17;74:25762 PMID 25694052
Cites: Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2003 Apr-May;24(3):333-52 PMID 12623689
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010 Oct 12;10:602 PMID 20939903
Cites: Natl Health Stat Report. 2010 Mar 9;(20):1-22 PMID 20583451
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):56-66 PMID 18468259
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014 Jun 18;73:23147 PMID 24971230
Cites: BMJ Open. 2012 Apr 05;2(2):e000614 PMID 22492384
Cites: Eur J Pain. 2009 Apr;13(4):426-30 PMID 18599328
Cites: BMJ Open. 2013 Jul 30;3(7):null PMID 23901028
Cites: Clin J Pain. 1999 Jun;15(2):85-91 PMID 10382921
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2015 Aug;43(6):588-96 PMID 25969164
Cites: Child Abuse Negl. 2007 May;31(5):517-30 PMID 17532465
Cites: Eur J Pain. 2006 May;10(4):287-333 PMID 16095934
Cites: Pain Med. 2012 Apr;13(4):522-40 PMID 22390201
Cites: Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Feb;34(4):662-7 PMID 15692959
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-5 PMID 15513673
Cites: Child Abuse Negl. 1994 Oct;18(10):837-47 PMID 7804891
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014 Jan 10;73:null PMID 24422205
PubMed ID
27802844 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood violence and mental health among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294377
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Berit Schei
Tore Sørlie
Hein Stigum
Espen Bjertness
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
a Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Abuse (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF , Karasjok , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and psychological distress and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTS) among Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore a possible mediating effect of childhood violence on any ethnic differences in mental health. This study is part of a larger questionnaire survey on health and living conditions in Mid- and Northern Norway (SAMINOR 2) which included 2116 Sami and 8674 non-Sami participants. A positive association between childhood violence and psychological distress and PTS in adulthood was found regardless of ethnicity. For women, childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences in psychological distress (53.2%) and PTS (31.4%). A similar pattern was found for men as to psychological distress (45.5%) and PTS (55.5%). The prevalence of psychological distress was significantly higher in the Sami than in the non-Sami group: 15.8% vs. 13.0% for women, and 11.4% vs. 8.0% for men. Likewise, PTS showed a higher prevalence in the Sami group, both for women (16.2% vs. 12.4%) and for men (12.2% vs. 9.1).
A positive association between childhood violence and adult mental distress was found for both Sami and Norwegian adults. More mental problems were found among the Sami. Childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Nov 22;72:21813 PMID 24282785
Cites: Lancet. 2016 Jul 9;388(10040):131-57 PMID 27108232
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Mar 04;74:27349 PMID 25742881
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Dec;91(12):1395-401 PMID 22881599
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2009 Nov;29(7):647-57 PMID 19733950
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1998 Jul;37(7):743-51 PMID 9666630
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 2014 Oct;107(4):751-64 PMID 25111305
Cites: J Relig Health. 2011 Dec;50(4):1024-39 PMID 20182917
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2002 May;61(2):110-22 PMID 12078958
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2003 Oct;18(10):864-70 PMID 14521650
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Sep 01;74:27669 PMID 26333721
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;49(1):26-50 PMID 22334242
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(9):707-13 PMID 17048080
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):97-113 PMID 18468262
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Oct;69(8):1194-203 PMID 19700231
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Apr;66(2):113-28 PMID 17515251
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Feb 13;74:25125 PMID 25683064
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2016;37:17-32 PMID 26653405
Cites: Lancet. 2016 Jul 9;388(10040):105-6 PMID 27108233
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Oct 5;360(9339):1083-8 PMID 12384003
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Dec 09;72:21775 PMID 24350066
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Sep;69(4):383-93 PMID 20719108
Cites: PLoS Med. 2012;9(11):e1001349 PMID 23209385
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012 Jul 03;71:18381 PMID 22765937
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2012 Feb;32(1):71-9 PMID 22172577
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2012 Oct;12(4):1667 PMID 23072253
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2003 Dec;13(4):361-6 PMID 14703325
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jan 3;373(9657):68-81 PMID 19056114
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Jun;51(3):299-319 PMID 24855142
Cites: Psychol Med. 2016 Feb;46(3):543-9 PMID 26511669
Cites: Int J Equity Health. 2004 May 6;3(1):3 PMID 15128460
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2004 Nov-Dec;39(3):227-37 PMID 15381341
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2003;57(2):113-8 PMID 12745773
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2007 Feb;116(1):176-87 PMID 17324028
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2002 Aug;55(8):775-81 PMID 12384191
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec;77(1):1481325 PMID 29869591
Cites: Natl Health Stat Report. 2010 Mar 9;(20):1-22 PMID 20583451
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 Feb 01;12:95 PMID 22296820
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1316939 PMID 28467230
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014 Jun 18;73:23147 PMID 24971230
Cites: Eur J Psychotraumatol. 2015 Jan 13;6:26259 PMID 25591729
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2015 Aug;43(6):588-96 PMID 25969164
Cites: Child Abuse Negl. 2007 May;31(5):517-30 PMID 17532465
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2008 Apr;64(4):393-403 PMID 18374738
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 Aug;96(8):1416-22 PMID 16809604
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Jul;162(7):1305-10 PMID 15994713
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-5 PMID 15513673
PubMed ID
30112962 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood violence and mental health among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299332
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Berit Schei
Tore Sørlie
Hein Stigum
Espen Bjertness
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
a Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Abuse (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF , Karasjok , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health - ethnology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - ethnology
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
Violence - ethnology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and psychological distress and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTS) among Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore a possible mediating effect of childhood violence on any ethnic differences in mental health. This study is part of a larger questionnaire survey on health and living conditions in Mid- and Northern Norway (SAMINOR 2) which included 2116 Sami and 8674 non-Sami participants. A positive association between childhood violence and psychological distress and PTS in adulthood was found regardless of ethnicity. For women, childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences in psychological distress (53.2%) and PTS (31.4%). A similar pattern was found for men as to psychological distress (45.5%) and PTS (55.5%). The prevalence of psychological distress was significantly higher in the Sami than in the non-Sami group: 15.8% vs. 13.0% for women, and 11.4% vs. 8.0% for men. Likewise, PTS showed a higher prevalence in the Sami group, both for women (16.2% vs. 12.4%) and for men (12.2% vs. 9.1).
A positive association between childhood violence and adult mental distress was found for both Sami and Norwegian adults. More mental problems were found among the Sami. Childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences.
PubMed ID
30112962 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cohort profile: Norwegian Epidemiologic Osteoporosis Studies (NOREPOS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261800
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Dec;42(8):804-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Anne Johanne Søgaard
Haakon E Meyer
Nina Emaus
Guri Grimnes
Clara Gram Gjesdal
Siri Forsmo
Berit Schei
Grethe S Tell
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Dec;42(8):804-13
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper describes the history, purpose, data collection and contributions in the research collaboration Norwegian Osteoporosis Epidemiologic Studies (NOREPOS).
NOREPOS encompasses almost 85,000 bone mineral density measurements within Cohort of Norway and data on almost 140,000 hip fractures in Norway 1994-2008. Included are anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, lipids and glucose, and 50 standard questions on sociodemographic factors, diseases and risk factors. Blood samples/DNA are stored. The main research question posed in NOREPOS is why hip fracture rates in Norway are the highest in the world. Data on hip fractures 2009-2013 will be added in 2014.
Main findings include: Every hour a Norwegian suffers a hip fracture; hip fracture incidence rates declined after 1999; only 16% of patients used anti-osteoporosis drugs 1 year after hip fracture; 25% of patients died within 1 year after the fracture; 12% suffered a new hip fracture within 10 years; rural dwellers had lower hip and forearm fracture incidence than city dwellers; magnesium in tap water may be protective whereas bacterial contamination, cadmium and lead may be harmful to bone health; low serum vitamin D and E levels were associated with higher hip fracture risk; vitamin A was not associated with fracture risk; and abdominal obesity increased the risk of hip fracture when BMI was accounted for.
NOREPOS encompasses a unique source of information for aetiological research, genetic studies as well as for biomarkers of osteoporosis and fractures. Because of the increasing number of elderly people in Europe, hip fractures will continue to pose an international public health and health care challenge.
PubMed ID
25278275 View in PubMed
Less detail

Correlates of forearm bone mineral density in young Norwegian women: the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9922
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Sep 1;156(5):418-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2002
Author
Gillian A Hawker
Siri Forsmo
Suzanne M Cadarette
Berit Schei
Susan B Jaglal
Lisa Forsén
Arnulf Langhammer
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, Women's College Ambulatory Care Centre, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. g.hawker@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Sep 1;156(5):418-27
Date
Sep-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Bone Density
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forearm
Humans
Logistic Models
Norway
Osteoporosis - etiology - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Maximizing attainment of optimal peak bone mineral density (BMD) is a potential osteoporosis prevention strategy. The main objective of this study was to identify correlates of forearm BMD in young adult women. Population-based data derived from standardized questionnaires administered to healthy women aged 19-35 years in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway (n = 963), were collected in 1995-1997. Forearm BMD was assessed by single x-ray absorptiometry. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were used to determine correlates of BMD (g/cm(2)) and lowest quintile of BMD, respectively, at the ultradistal and distal sites. The mean age and weight of the cohort were 29.7 years (standard deviation 4.7) and 68.6 kg (standard deviation 12.5), respectively. Age and weight were positively associated with BMD at both forearm sites. When data were controlled for age and weight, later age at menarche and lack of milk consumption were associated with lower BMD values. In both linear models and logistic models, none of the factors vitamin D intake, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, amenorrhea, oral contraceptive use, number of pregnancies, history of breastfeeding, and family history of osteoporosis were found to be significantly associated with BMD. Prior studies have suggested that calcium supplementation in children is useful for optimizing peak BMD. Further studies exploring the relation between lifestyle factors and BMD are warranted to search for ways to maximize attainment of peak BMD.
PubMed ID
12196311 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does group training during pregnancy prevent lumbopelvic pain? A randomized clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164628
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(3):276-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Siv Mørkved
Kjell Asmund Salvesen
Berit Schei
Stian Lydersen
Kari Bø
Author Affiliation
Clinical Service and National Center for Fetal Medicine, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway. siv.morkved@ntnu.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(3):276-82
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Exercise Movement Techniques
Female
Health status
Humans
Low Back Pain - prevention & control
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Patient Education as Topic
Pelvic Floor - physiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Prevention of lumbopelvic pain in pregnancy has been sparsely studied. One aim of this study was to assess if a 12-week training program during pregnancy can prevent and/or treat lumbopelvic pain. A randomized controlled trial was conducted at Trondheim University Hospital and three outpatient physiotherapy clinics. Three hundred and one healthy nulliparous women were included at 20 weeks of pregnancy and randomly allocated to a training group (148) or a control group (153).
The outcome measures were self-reported symptoms of lumbopelvic pain (once per week or more), sick leave, and functional status. Pain drawing was used to document the painful area of the body. The intervention included daily pelvic floor muscle training at home, and weekly group training over 12 weeks including aerobic exercises, pelvic floor muscle and additional exercises, and information related to pregnancy.
At 36 weeks of gestation women in the training group were significantly less likely to report lumbopelvic pain: 65/148 (44%) versus 86/153 (56%) (p=0.03). Three months after delivery the difference was 39/148 (26%) in the training group versus 56/153 (37%) in the control group (p=0.06). There was no difference in sick leave during pregnancy, but women in the training group had significantly (p=0.01) higher scores on functional status.
A 12-week specially designed training program during pregnancy was effective in preventing lumbopelvic pain in pregnancy.
Notes
Comment In: Aust J Physiother. 2007;53(3):20217899664
PubMed ID
17364300 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does thyroid function influence fracture risk? Prospective data from the HUNT2 study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107290
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Dec;169(6):845-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Anders Svare
Tom Ivar Lund Nilsen
Bjørn Olav Asvold
Siri Forsmo
Berit Schei
Trine Bjøro
Arnulf Langhammer
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Dec;169(6):845-52
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bone Density
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - blood - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Hip Fractures - blood - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Radius Fractures - blood - epidemiology
Registries
Risk
Thyroid Function Tests
Thyroid Gland - metabolism
Thyrotropin - blood
Ulna Fractures - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
To prospectively study the relation between TSH and risk of hip and forearm fractures.
A population-based cohort study.
In a substudy of the second survey of the Nord Trøndelag Health Study, Norway (HUNT2, 1995-97), linked with a hospital-based fracture registry, we investigated the relation between baseline TSH and risk of hip and/or forearm fractures.
A total of 16?610 women and 8595 men aged 40 years or more, without previous self-reported thyroid disease and hip or forearm fractures.
During 12.5 years follow-up, a total of 1870 women and 342 men experienced hip or forearm fractures. Overall, there was no relation between baseline TSH and fracture risk. However, there was weak evidence that women with TSH 3.5?mU/l had a slightly increased risk of hip fractures (hazard ratio (HR) 1.30, 95% CI 0.97-1.94 and HR 1.19, 95% CI 0.93-1.52) compared with the reference group with TSH of 1.5-2.4?mU/l. Supplementary analyses showed higher hip fracture risk in women with TSH >4.0?mU/l and negative thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) compared with the reference group (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.24-2.46).
We found no statistically significant relation between baseline TSH and subsequent fracture risk, but the data suggest a weak positive association with hip fracture risk among women with both low and high TSH. The latter association was confined to women with negative TPOAb status.
PubMed ID
24031093 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Do physicians experience spousal support in their medical career?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52101
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 28;123(16):2296-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-2003
Author
Wenche Østerlie
Siri Forsmo
Kristen Ringdal
Berit Schei
Olaf Gjerløw Aasland
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisinske fag, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Medisinsk teknisk senter, Trondheim. wenche.osterlie@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 28;123(16):2296-9
Date
Aug-28-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Career Choice
Conflict (Psychology)
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Life Style
Male
Marriage - psychology
Norway
Nuclear Family - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Physicians - psychology
Physicians, Women - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The professional life of physicians is characterised by long working days and pressure for efficiency. Family life represents an arena for developing other aspects of life. It is not well known to what extent physicians' spouses are supportive of the physician's total situation, or how gender, age, family or professional aspects influence this perception. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a nation-wide survey of the medical profession, 1594 male and 512 female physicians answered 12 attitude statements relating to work and family life. The responses were grouped by factor analysis into three dimensions: emotional support, instrumental support, and conflict. The statistical analysis for associations between social support and age, family and professional factors was performed separately for men and women in multivariate models. RESULTS: Physicians were generally satisfied with the support given by their spouses. Female physicians reported more emotional support; male physicians perceived or reported more practical support as well as more conflict. The experience of conflict was most pronounced among physicians aged 35-44 and among those reporting long working hours. The strongest positive association between social support and spouse's profession was found for spouses who were physicians themselves. INTERPRETATION: Experienced spousal support among Norwegian physicians is influenced by gender and various aspects of work and family life. Physicians with same-profession spouses expressed the greatest satisfaction with the support they received.
PubMed ID
14508560 View in PubMed
Less detail

Emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and the association with symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress in a multi-ethnic pregnant population in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281889
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Oct;9:7-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Anne-Marie Wangel
Elsa Lena Ryding
Berit Schei
Margareta Östman
Mirjam Lukasse
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Oct;9:7-13
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bullying
Child
Child Abuse
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - etiology
Depressive Disorder - etiology
Emotions
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Language
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Offenses - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aims to describe the prevalence of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and analyze associations with symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress (PTS) in pregnancy, by ethnic background.
This is a cross-sectional study of the Swedish data from the Bidens cohort study. Ethnicity was categorized as native and non-native Swedish-speakers. Women completed a questionnaire while attending routine antenatal care. The NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ) assessed a history of emotional, physical or sexual abuse. The Edinburgh Depression Scale-5 measured symptoms of depression. Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress (PTS) included intrusion, avoidance and numbness.
Of 1003 women, 78.6% were native and 21.4% were non-native Swedish-speakers. Native and non-native Swedish-speakers experienced a similar proportion of lifetime abuse. Moderate emotional and physical abuse in childhood was significantly more common among non-native Swedish-speakers. Sexual abuse in adulthood was significantly more prevalent among native Swedish-speakers. Emotional and sexual abuse were significantly associated with symptoms of depression for both natives and non-natives. Physical abuse was significantly associated with symptoms of depression for non-natives only. All types of abuse were significantly associated with symptoms of PTS for both native and non-native Swedish-speakers. Adding ethnicity to the multiple binary regression analyses did not really alter the association between the different types of abuse and symptoms of depression and PTS.
The prevalence of lifetime abuse did not differ significantly for native and non-native Swedish-speakers but there were significant differences on a more detailed level. Abuse was associated with symptoms of depression and PTS. Being a non-native Swedish-speaker did not influence the association much.
PubMed ID
27634658 View in PubMed
Less detail

Emotional, physical and sexual violence among Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: The SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262599
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 May 12;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-12-2015
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Cecilie Javo
Berit Schei
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 May 12;
Date
May-12-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To assess the prevalence and investigate ethnic differences of emotional, physical and sexual violence among a population of both Sami and non-Sami in Norway.
Our study was based on the SAMINOR 2 study, a population-based survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Central and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,296 participants: 2197 (19.4%) Sami respondents and 9099 (80.6 %) non-Sami respondents.
Almost half of the Sami female respondents and one-third of the non-Sami female respondents reported any violence (any lifetime experience of violence). Sami women were more likely to report emotional, physical and sexual violence than non-Sami women. More than one-third of the Sami men compared with less than a quarter of non-Sami men reported having experienced any violence in their life. Sami men were more likely to report emotional and physical violence than non-Sami men. However, ethnicity was not significantly different regarding sexual violence experienced among men. Violence was typically reported to have occurred in childhood. Sami participants were more likely to report having experienced violence in the past 12 months. For all types of violence, the perpetrator was typically known to the victim.
Regardless of gender, Sami respondents were more likely to report interpersonal violence. The prevalence of any violence was substantial in both ethnic groups and for both genders; it was highest among Sami women.
PubMed ID
25969164 View in PubMed
Less detail

62 records – page 2 of 7.