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Are sociodemographic and regional and sample factors associated with prevalence of abuse?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71122
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Mar;83(3):276-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Katarina Swahnberg
Barbro Wijma
Berit Schei
Malene Hilden
Kirstine Irminger
Gun B Wingren
Author Affiliation
Division of Women's Health, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. katsw@imk.liu.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Mar;83(3):276-88
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Attitude of Health Personnel
Battered Women - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gynecology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Probability
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Rural Population
Sampling Studies
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aims of the present study were: 1) to estimate the prevalence of emotional, physical and sexual abuse and abuse in the health care system, and 2) to study the associations between prevalence of abuse and sociodemographic and sample variables. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used a validated postal questionnaire in four Swedish samples; patients at three gynecologic clinics with different character and in different regions (n = 2439) and women in one randomized population sample (n = 1168). RESULTS: Any lifetime emotional abuse was reported by 16.8-21.4% of the women; physical abuse by 32.1-37.5%; sexual abuse by 15.9-17.0%; and abuse in the health care system by 14.0-19.7%. For 7-8% abuse had included life threats and 9-20% of all women in the study currently suffered from their experiences of abuse. Most women had not disclosed their background of abuse to the gynecologist. There were differences in sociodemographic variables between the four samples. Generally, in the multivariate analyses we found associations between prevalence of abuse and age, educational level, civil status and occupation, but no consistent association between prevalence of abuse and sample variables. CONCLUSION: Lifetime prevalence rates of the four kinds of abuse were high in all samples as measured by the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ), and 1/10-1/5 women in the study suffered currently from abusive experiences. In multivariate analyses prevalence of abuse was consistently associated with sociodemographic but not to sample variables.
PubMed ID
14995925 View in PubMed
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Ethanol and drug findings in women consulting a Sexual Assault Center--associations with clinical characteristics and suspicions of drug-facilitated sexual assault.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108265
Source
J Forensic Leg Med. 2013 Aug;20(6):777-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Cecilie T Hagemann
Arne Helland
Olav Spigset
Ketil A Espnes
Kari Ormstad
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 8905, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway. cecilie.hagemann@ntnu.no
Source
J Forensic Leg Med. 2013 Aug;20(6):777-84
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analgesics, Opioid - analysis
Benzodiazepines - analysis
Cannabinoids - analysis
Central Nervous System Depressants - analysis
Central Nervous System Stimulants - analysis
Child
Ethanol - analysis
Female
Forensic Toxicology
Humans
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to describe toxicological findings among women seeking health care after sexual assault, and to assess the relationship with so-called proactive DFSA (drug facilitated sexual assault). We also explored associations between ethanol in blood/urine and background data, assault characteristics, and clinical findings. We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study of female patients = 12 years of age consulting the Sexual Assault Center at St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. They were examined between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2010, and urine and/or blood were analyzed for ethanol and selected medicinal/recreational drugs. Among the 264 patients included, ethanol and/or drugs were detected in 155 (59%). Of the 50 patients (19%) testing positive for drugs other than ethanol, benzodiazepines/benzodiazepine-like drugs were found in 31, central stimulants in 14, cannabinoids in 13 and opioids in nine. None tested positive for gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). In total, 57 patients (22%) suspected proactive DFSA, but only five had findings of sedative drugs that were not accounted for by self-reported voluntary intake. No cases could unequivocally be attributed to proactive DFSA. Among the 120 patients tested for ethanol within 12 h after the assault, 102 were positive. The median estimated blood alcohol concentration (BAC) at the time of assault was 1.87 g/L. Patients testing positive for ethanol more often reported a public place of assault and a stranger assailant. Higher estimated BAC at the time of assault was associated with higher frequency of suspecting proactive DFSA. Ethanol was the most prevalent toxicological finding in urine/blood from victims of sexual assault, and high ethanol concentrations were often detected. Among the patients suspecting proactive DFSA, very few had sedative drug findings not explained by voluntary intake. It seems like opportunistic DFSA, rather than proactive DFSA dominate among the sexually assaulted attending our SAC.
PubMed ID
23910880 View in PubMed
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Experiences of physical and sexual abuse and their implications for current health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163854
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2007 May;109(5):1116-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Ulla Pikarinen
Terhi Saisto
Berit Schei
Katarina Swahnberg
Erja Halmesmäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, South Karelian Central Hospital, Lappeenranta, Finland. ulla.pikarinen@fimnet.fi
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2007 May;109(5):1116-22
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Domestic Violence - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genital Diseases, Female - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Physician-Patient Relations
Prevalence
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To estimate the prevalence of a history of physical and sexual abuse in adulthood among gynecological patients and the association with general and reproductive health.
A cross-sectional questionnaire study on abusive experiences of gynecologic outpatients in a tertiary hospital. The total sample size was 691.
Of all women, 42.4% had experienced moderate or severe physical or sexual abuse as an adult. One hundred forty-seven (21.6%) women reported physical abuse, 84 (12.3%) sexual abuse, and 58 (8.5%) both. The abused and nonabused women did not differ in mean age, education, or parity. Sexually abused women and those who were both sexually and physically abused reported poor general health significantly more often (P=.005 and P=.001, respectively) than the nonabused. They also rated their sex life as significantly worse than the nonabused women (P=.002 and P=.012, respectively). Over half of abused women had experienced common physical complaints during the previous 12 months compared with one third of the nonabused (P
PubMed ID
17470592 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of emotional, physical and sexual abuse among pregnant women in six European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103030
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2014 Jul;93(7):669-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Mirjam Lukasse
Anne-Mette Schroll
Elsa Lena Ryding
Jacquelyn Campbell
Helle Karro
Hildur Kristjansdottir
Made Laanpere
Thora Steingrimsdottir
Ann Tabor
Marleen Temmerman
An-Sofie Van Parys
Anne-Marie Wangel
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Health, Nutrition and Management, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2014 Jul;93(7):669-77
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Belgium - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Prenatal Care
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Spouse Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The primary objective was to investigate the prevalence of a history of abuse among women attending routine antenatal care in six northern European countries. Second, we explored current suffering from reported abuse.
A prospective cohort study.
Routine antenatal care in Belgium, Iceland, Denmark, Estonia, Norway, and Sweden between March 2008 and August 2010.
A total of 7174 pregnant women.
A questionnaire including a validated instrument measuring emotional, physical and sexual abuse.
Proportion of women reporting emotional, physical and sexual abuse. Severe current suffering defined as a Visual Analogue Scale score of =6.
An overall lifetime prevalence of any abuse was reported by 34.8% of the pregnant women. The ranges across the six countries of lifetime prevalence were 9.7-30.8% for physical abuse, 16.2-27.7% for emotional abuse, and 8.3-21.1% for sexual abuse. Few women reported current sexual abuse, 0.4% compared with 2.2% current physical abuse and 2.7% current emotional abuse. Current severe suffering was reported by 6.8% of the women who reported physical abuse, 9.8% of those who reported sexual abuse and 13.5% for emotional abuse.
A high proportion of pregnant women attending routine antenatal care report a history of abuse. About one in ten of them experiences severe current suffering from the reported abuse. In particular, these women might benefit from being identified in the antenatal care setting and being offered specialized care.
PubMed ID
24720803 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of sexual, physical and emotional abuse in the Norwegian mother and child cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115923
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:186
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Marie Flem Sørbø
Hilde Grimstad
Johan Håkon Bjørngaard
Berit Schei
Mirjam Lukasse
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, (NTNU), Postbox 8905, N-7491, Trondheim, Norway. marie.flem.sorbo@ntnu.no
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:186
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Age Distribution
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Emotions
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Risk factors
Self Report
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Abuse of women occurs in every society of the world. Increased information about the prevalence in industrialized countries, like Norway, is required to make strategies to prevent abuse. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported sexual, physical and emotional abuse in a large obstetric population in Norway, and the associations between exposure to adult abuse, socio-demographics and other characteristics.
Our study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child (MoBa) Cohort study, conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. The current study included 65,393 women who responded to two extensive postal questionnaires during pregnancy. Any adult abuse is defined as being exposed to one or more types of adult abuse, any child abuse is defined as being exposed to one or more types of child abuse, and any lifetime abuse is defined as being exposed to abuse either as a child and/or as an adult. Perpetrators were categorized as known or stranger.
Overall, 32% of the women reported any lifetime abuse, 20% reported any adult abuse, 19% reported any child abuse and 6% reported abuse both as adults and as children. Emotional abuse was the most frequently reported type of abuse both as adults (16%) and children (14%). Adult sexual abuse was reported by 5% and child sexual abuse by 7%. Physical abuse was reported by 6% as adults and by 6% as children. Approximately 30% of those reporting adult or child abuse reported exposure to two or three types of abuse. Five percent of the women reported exposure to any abuse during the last 12 months. For all types of abuse, a known perpetrator was more commonly reported. Logistic regression showed that being exposed to child abuse, smoking and drinking alcohol in the first trimester of pregnancy, living alone, and belonging to the eldest age group were significantly associated with being exposed to any adult abuse.
The reported prevalence of any lifetime abuse was substantial in our low-risk pregnant population. Antenatal care is an opportunity for clinicians to ask about experiences of abuse and identify those at risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23452504 View in PubMed
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Sexual violence and antenatal hospitalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105585
Source
Birth. 2013 Dec;40(4):281-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Lena Henriksen
Siri Vangen
Berit Schei
Mirjam Lukasse
Author Affiliation
Oslo University Hospital, Section of Obstetrics at the Woman and Children's Division, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Birth. 2013 Dec;40(4):281-8
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies have shown the negative impact sexual violence has on pregnancy outcome, yet the impact on antenatal hospitalization has been poorly examined. The aim of this study was to investigate if a history of sexual violence was associated with hospitalization during pregnancy.
A population-based national cohort study conducted by the Institute of Public Health, The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study. Women filled out questionnaires at 17 and 30 weeks' gestation. History of sexual violence was reported at three levels: pressured to sexual acts (mild), forced with violence (moderate), and raped (severe). The comparison group did not report sexual violence. Differences were assessed using Pearson's X(2) tests and logistic regression analyses.
Of 78,660 women, 12.0% were pressured to sexual acts, 2.8% forced with violence, and 3.6% reported rape. A history of sexual violence was associated with significantly more hospitalizations during pregnancy, 6.6 percent for mild, 8.7 percent for moderate and 12.5 percent for severe, compared to 5.8 percent for no sexual violence. Women were significantly more often admitted for hyperemesis, bleeding, threatening preterm birth, other reasons and admitted without giving any reason. Reporting severe sexual violence had an AOR for being hospitalized with hyperemesis or threatening preterm birth of 1.9 (95% CI 1.4-2.5), and 1.9 (1.3-2.7) respectively. Similarly, severe sexual violence was associated with being admitted more than once during pregnancy AOR 1.9 (1.3-2.7).
Women with a history of sexual violence reported significantly more antenatal hospitalizations during pregnancy than women without such a history.
PubMed ID
24344709 View in PubMed
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Sexual violence and pregnancy-related physical symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121714
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2012;12:83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mirjam Lukasse
Lena Henriksen
Siri Vangen
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice at the Faculty of Medicine, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Håkon Jarls gate 11, N-7489, Trondheim, Norway. Mirjam.Lukasse@gmail.com
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2012;12:83
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Rape - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Few studies have investigated the impact of sexual violence on health during pregnancy. We examined the association between sexual violence and the reporting of physical symptoms during pregnancy.
A population-based national cohort study conducted by The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study (MoBa) collected data from pregnant women through postal questionnaires at 17 and 32?weeks gestation. Three levels of sexual violence were measured: 1) mild (pressured into sexual relations), 2) moderate (forced with violence into sexual relation) and 3) severe (rape). Differences between women reporting and not reporting sexual violence were assessed using Pearson's X2 test and multiple logistic regression analyses.
Of 78 660 women, 12.0% (9 444) reported mild, 2.8% (2 219) moderate and 3.6% (2 805) severe sexual violence. Sexual violence was significantly associated with increased reporting of pregnancy-related physical symptoms, both measured in number of symptoms and duration/degree of suffering. Compared to women not reporting sexual violence, the probability of suffering from =8 pregnancy-related symptoms estimated by Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) was 1.49 (1.41-1.58) for mild sexual violence, 1.66(1.50-1.84) for moderate and 1.78 (1.62-1.95) for severe. Severe sexual violence both previously and recently had the strongest association with suffering from =8 pregnancy-related symptoms, AOR 6.70 (2.34-19.14).
A history of sexual violence is associated with increased reporting of pregnancy-related physical symptoms. Clinicians should consider the possible role of a history of sexual violence when treating women who suffer extensively from pregnancy-related symptoms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22883753 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.