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The association between physical activity and forearm bone mineral density in healthy premenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49682
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):301-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Liv Berit Augestad
Berit Schei
Siri Forsmo
Arnulf Langhammer
W Dana Flanders
Author Affiliation
Program for Sport Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. liv.berit.augestad@svt.ntnu.no
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):301-13
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Bone Density
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Exercise - physiology
Female
Forearm
Humans
Motor Activity
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Physical Fitness
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Radius - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyze the association between recreational and occupational physical activity and forearm bone mineral density (BMD) in healthy premenopausal women. METHODS: During 1984-1986, a population-based health survey (HUNT 1) was conducted among women and men aged >19 years in Nord-Trøndelag county in Norway. The second, follow-up survey (HUNT 2) was conducted during 1995-1997. The subjects in this study consist of healthy premenopausal women (n = 1396)
PubMed ID
15130259 View in PubMed
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Childhood abuse and fear of childbirth--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139256
Source
Birth. 2010 Dec;37(4):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Mirjam Lukasse
Siri Vangen
Pål Øian
Merethe Kumle
Elsa Lena Ryding
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø, Tromsø, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Birth. 2010 Dec;37(4):267-74
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fear
Female
Humans
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Childhood abuse affects adult health. The objective of this study was to examine the association between a self-reported history of childhood abuse and fear of childbirth.
A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted of 2,365 pregnant women at five obstetrical departments in Norway. We measured childhood abuse using the Norvold Abuse Questionnaire and fear of childbirth using the Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire. Severe fear of childbirth was defined as a Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire score of = 85.
Of all women, 566 (23.9%) had experienced any childhood abuse, 257 (10.9%) had experienced emotional abuse, 260 (11%) physical abuse, and 290 (12.3%) sexual abuse. Women with a history of childhood abuse reported severe fear of childbirth significantly more often than those without a history of childhood abuse, 18 percent versus 10 percent (p = 0.001). The association between a history of childhood abuse and severe fear of childbirth remained significant after adjustment for confounding factors for primiparas (adjusted OR: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.30-3.08) but lost its significance for multiparas (adjusted OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 0.76-1.80). The factor with the strongest association with severe fear of childbirth among multiparas was a negative birth experience (adjusted OR: 5.50; 95% CI: 3.77-8.01).
A history of childhood abuse significantly increased the risk of experiencing severe fear of childbirth among primiparas. Fear of childbirth among multiparas was most strongly associated with a negative birth experience.
PubMed ID
21083717 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289285
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32798
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Berit Schei
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Tore Sørlie
Nils Fleten
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Use (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF, Karasjok, Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32798
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Chronic Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental health
Norway
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population.
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences.
The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence.
Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity.
Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27802844 View in PubMed
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Correlates of forearm bone mineral density in young Norwegian women: the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9922
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Sep 1;156(5):418-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2002
Author
Gillian A Hawker
Siri Forsmo
Suzanne M Cadarette
Berit Schei
Susan B Jaglal
Lisa Forsén
Arnulf Langhammer
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, Women's College Ambulatory Care Centre, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. g.hawker@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Sep 1;156(5):418-27
Date
Sep-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Bone Density
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forearm
Humans
Logistic Models
Norway
Osteoporosis - etiology - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Maximizing attainment of optimal peak bone mineral density (BMD) is a potential osteoporosis prevention strategy. The main objective of this study was to identify correlates of forearm BMD in young adult women. Population-based data derived from standardized questionnaires administered to healthy women aged 19-35 years in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway (n = 963), were collected in 1995-1997. Forearm BMD was assessed by single x-ray absorptiometry. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were used to determine correlates of BMD (g/cm(2)) and lowest quintile of BMD, respectively, at the ultradistal and distal sites. The mean age and weight of the cohort were 29.7 years (standard deviation 4.7) and 68.6 kg (standard deviation 12.5), respectively. Age and weight were positively associated with BMD at both forearm sites. When data were controlled for age and weight, later age at menarche and lack of milk consumption were associated with lower BMD values. In both linear models and logistic models, none of the factors vitamin D intake, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, amenorrhea, oral contraceptive use, number of pregnancies, history of breastfeeding, and family history of osteoporosis were found to be significantly associated with BMD. Prior studies have suggested that calcium supplementation in children is useful for optimizing peak BMD. Further studies exploring the relation between lifestyle factors and BMD are warranted to search for ways to maximize attainment of peak BMD.
PubMed ID
12196311 View in PubMed
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Hip fractures in Norway 1999-2008: time trends in total incidence and second hip fracture rates: a NOREPOS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121878
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;27(10):807-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Tone K Omsland
Kristin Holvik
Haakon E Meyer
Jacqueline R Center
Nina Emaus
Grethe S Tell
Berit Schei
Aage Tverdal
Clara G Gjesdal
Guri Grimnes
Siri Forsmo
John A Eisman
Anne Johanne Søgaard
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, Oslo, Norway. Tone.Kristin.Omsland@fhi.no
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;27(10):807-14
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Recurrence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Declining incidences of hip fractures are reported from western countries. Norway has among the highest rates in the world. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in total hip fracture rates in Norway between 1999 and 2008 and risk of second hip fractures. All hospitalizations given a hip fracture diagnosis code (International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 9 or ICD 10) (cervical, trochanteric or subtrochanteric) in Norwegian hospitals were retrieved with accompanying surgical procedure codes and additional diagnoses. A total of 93,123 hip fractures were identified between 1999 and 2008 in persons =50 years. Annual incidences of hip fractures were calculated and tested for trends. Rates of first and second hip fractures (2006-2008) were compared. The age-standardized total incidence of hip fracture decreased by 13.4 % (95 % confidence interval (CI): 11.0-15.6) in women and 4.8 % (95 % CI: 0.7, 8.7) in men. Age-adjusted rates of second hip fractures did not change in the observation period. In those with a prior hip fracture, the age-standardized risk of a subsequent hip fracture was 2.5-fold (95 % CI: 2.5, 2.6) in women, and 4.6-fold (95 % CI: 4.5, 4.7) in men. Total hip fracture rates declined in both genders during 1999-2008, whereas rates of second hip fractures did not change.
PubMed ID
22870851 View in PubMed
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Intimate partner violence and cardiovascular risk in women: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116149
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2013 Mar;22(3):250-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Lise Eilin Stene
Geir Wenberg Jacobsen
Grete Dyb
Aage Tverdal
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. lise.stene@nkvts.unirand.no
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2013 Mar;22(3):250-8
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Spouse Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A potential link between intimate partner violence (IPV) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been suggested, yet evidence is scarce. We assessed cardiovascular risk and incident prescription of cardiovascular medication by lifetime experiences of physical and/or sexual IPV and psychological IPV alone in women.
A population-based cohort study of women aged 30-60 years was performed using cross-sectional data and clinical measurements from the Oslo Health Study (2000-2001) linked with prospective prescription records from the Norwegian Prescription Database (January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2009). We used age-standardized chi-square analyses to compare clinical characteristics by IPV cross-sectionally, and Cox proportional hazards regression to examine cardiovascular drug prescription prospectively.
Our study included 5593 women without cardiovascular disease or drug use at baseline. Altogether 751 (13.4%) women disclosed IPV experiences: 415 (7.4%) physical and/or sexual IPV and 336 (6.0 %) psychological IPV alone. Cross-sectional analyses showed that women who reported physical and/or sexual IPV and psychological IPV alone were more often smokers compared with women who reported no IPV. Physical and/or sexual violence was associated with abdominal obesity, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and elevated triglycerides. The prospective analysis showed that women who reported physical and/or sexual IPV were more likely to receive antihypertensive medication: incidence rate ratios adjusted for age were 1.27 (95% confidence interval 1.02-1.58) and 1.36 (CI 1.09-1.70) after additional adjustment for education and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. No significant differences were found for cardiovascular drugs overall or lipid modifying drugs.
Our findings indicate that clinicians should assess the cardiovascular risk of women with a history of physical and/or sexual IPV, and consider including CVD prevention measures as part of their follow-up.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23428282 View in PubMed
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Mental health status in pregnancy among native and non-native Swedish-speaking women: a Bidens study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121746
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Dec;91(12):1395-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Anne-Marie Wangel
Berit Schei
Elsa Lena Ryding
Margareta Ostman
Author Affiliation
Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö, Sweden. anne-marie.wangel@mah.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Dec;91(12):1395-401
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Depression, Postpartum - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Language
Life Change Events
Mental health
Pregnancy
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To describe mental health status in native and non-native Swedish-speaking pregnant women and explore risk factors of depression and posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms.
A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted at midwife-based antenatal clinics in Southern Sweden.
A non-selected group of women in mid-pregnancy.
Participants completed a questionnaire covering background characteristics, social support, life events, mental health variables and the short Edinburgh Depression Scale.
Depressive symptoms during the past week and PTS symptoms during the past year.
Out of 1003 women, 21.4% reported another language than Swedish as their mother tongue and were defined as non-native. These women were more likely to be younger, have fewer years of education, potential financial problems, and lack of social support. More non-native speakers self-reported depressive, PTS, anxiety and, psychosomatic symptoms, and fewer had had consultations with a psychiatrist or psychologist. Of all women, 13.8% had depressive symptoms defined by Edinburgh Depression Scale 7 or above. Non-native status was associated with statistically increased risks of depressive symptoms and having =1 PTS symptom compared with native-speaking women. Multivariate modeling including all selected factors resulted in adjusted odds ratios for depressive symptoms of 1.75 (95% confidence interval: 1.11-2.76) and of 1.56 (95% confidence interval: 1.10-2.34) for PTS symptoms in non-native Swedish speakers.
Non-native Swedish-speaking women had a more unfavorable mental health status than native speakers. In spite of this, non-native speaking women had sought less mental health care.
PubMed ID
22881599 View in PubMed
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No increase in risk of hip fracture at high serum retinol concentrations in community-dwelling older Norwegians: the Norwegian Epidemiologic Osteoporosis Studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269988
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Nov;102(5):1289-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Kristin Holvik
Luai A Ahmed
Siri Forsmo
Clara G Gjesdal
Guri Grimnes
Sven Ove Samuelsen
Berit Schei
Rune Blomhoff
Grethe S Tell
Haakon E Meyer
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Nov;102(5):1289-96
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Aged
Calcifediol - blood
Case-Control Studies
Cod Liver Oil - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Elder Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Osteoporotic Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Vitamin A - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Norway has the highest hip fracture rates worldwide and a relatively high vitamin A intake. Increased fracture risk at high intakes and serum concentrations of retinol (s-retinol) have been observed in epidemiologic studies.
We aimed to study the association between s-retinol and hip fracture and whether high s-retinol may counteract a preventive effect of vitamin D.
We conducted the largest prospective analysis of serum retinol and hip fracture to date in 21,774 men and women aged 65-79 y (mean age: 72 y) who attended 4 community-based health studies during 1994-2001. Incident hip fractures occurring up to 10.7 y after baseline were retrieved from electronic hospital discharge registers. Retinol determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection in stored serum was available in 1154 incident hip fracture cases with valid body mass index (BMI) data and in a subcohort defined as a sex-stratified random sample (n = 1418). Cox proportional hazards regression weighted according to the stratified case-cohort design was performed.
There was a modest increased risk of hip fracture in the lowest compared with the middle quintile of s-retinol (HR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.82) adjusted for sex and study center. The association was attenuated after adjustment for BMI and serum concentrations of a-tocopherol (HR: 1.16; 95% CI: 0.88, 1.51). We found no increased risk in the upper compared with the middle quintile. No significant interaction between serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and s-retinol on hip fracture was observed (P = 0.68).
We found no evidence of an adverse effect of high serum retinol on hip fracture or any interaction between retinol and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. If anything, there tended to be an increased risk at low retinol concentrations, which was attenuated after control for confounders. We propose that cod liver oil, a commonly used food supplement in Norway, should not be discouraged as a natural source of vitamin D for fracture prevention.
PubMed ID
26377161 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of sexual, physical and emotional abuse in the Norwegian mother and child cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115923
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:186
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Marie Flem Sørbø
Hilde Grimstad
Johan Håkon Bjørngaard
Berit Schei
Mirjam Lukasse
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, (NTNU), Postbox 8905, N-7491, Trondheim, Norway. marie.flem.sorbo@ntnu.no
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:186
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Age Distribution
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Emotions
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Risk factors
Self Report
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Abuse of women occurs in every society of the world. Increased information about the prevalence in industrialized countries, like Norway, is required to make strategies to prevent abuse. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported sexual, physical and emotional abuse in a large obstetric population in Norway, and the associations between exposure to adult abuse, socio-demographics and other characteristics.
Our study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child (MoBa) Cohort study, conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. The current study included 65,393 women who responded to two extensive postal questionnaires during pregnancy. Any adult abuse is defined as being exposed to one or more types of adult abuse, any child abuse is defined as being exposed to one or more types of child abuse, and any lifetime abuse is defined as being exposed to abuse either as a child and/or as an adult. Perpetrators were categorized as known or stranger.
Overall, 32% of the women reported any lifetime abuse, 20% reported any adult abuse, 19% reported any child abuse and 6% reported abuse both as adults and as children. Emotional abuse was the most frequently reported type of abuse both as adults (16%) and children (14%). Adult sexual abuse was reported by 5% and child sexual abuse by 7%. Physical abuse was reported by 6% as adults and by 6% as children. Approximately 30% of those reporting adult or child abuse reported exposure to two or three types of abuse. Five percent of the women reported exposure to any abuse during the last 12 months. For all types of abuse, a known perpetrator was more commonly reported. Logistic regression showed that being exposed to child abuse, smoking and drinking alcohol in the first trimester of pregnancy, living alone, and belonging to the eldest age group were significantly associated with being exposed to any adult abuse.
The reported prevalence of any lifetime abuse was substantial in our low-risk pregnant population. Antenatal care is an opportunity for clinicians to ask about experiences of abuse and identify those at risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23452504 View in PubMed
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Self-reported pelvic organ prolapse surgery, prevalence, and nonobstetric risk factors: findings from the Nord Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268473
Source
Int Urogynecol J. 2015 Mar;26(3):407-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Risa Anna Margaretha Lonnée-Hoffmann
Øyvind Salvesen
Siv Mørkved
Berit Schei
Source
Int Urogynecol J. 2015 Mar;26(3):407-14
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - epidemiology
Body mass index
Constipation - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Lifting
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupations
Pelvic Organ Prolapse - epidemiology - surgery
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Risk factors
Self Report
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess prevalence and risk factors of self-reported pelvic organ prolapse (POP) surgery in a Nordic county.
We assessed cross-sectional data collection from participants in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study in 2006-2008. All women in the county =30 years were eligible, of whom 20,285 (50.3 %) responded by completing questionnaires and attending screening stations. Outcome measures were self-reported POP surgery, age at survey, sociodemographic factors, and information on selected risk factors for POP: self-reported smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, constipation a decade prior, and measured body mass index (BMI). Descriptive statistics, Kaplan-Meier estimates, and multivariate logistic regression were used. Statistical significance was defined as p?=?0.01.
POP surgery was reported by 1,123 (5.3 %) of all women: 0.7 % 60. Cumulative incidence by age 85 was 14.6 %; mean age at surgery was 51.6 [standard deviation 14.7]. After adjustment for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, odds ratios (OR) with 99 % confidence intervals (CI) for reporting the need for POP surgery were marked constipation 1.83 (1.30-2.56), BMI categories above normal 1.58-1.64 (1.10-2.25), COPD 1.51 (1.06-2.16), occupation involving lifting compared with sitting 1.40 (0.98-2.01), and asthma 1.25 (0.98-1.59). Cigarette smoking was not significantly associated.
Prevalence of self-reported POP surgery was high and increased with age. Constipation reported a decade prior, above-normal BMI, and COPD were significant nonobstetric risk factors.
PubMed ID
25348931 View in PubMed
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