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Are sociodemographic and regional and sample factors associated with prevalence of abuse?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71122
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Mar;83(3):276-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Katarina Swahnberg
Barbro Wijma
Berit Schei
Malene Hilden
Kirstine Irminger
Gun B Wingren
Author Affiliation
Division of Women's Health, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. katsw@imk.liu.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Mar;83(3):276-88
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Attitude of Health Personnel
Battered Women - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gynecology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Probability
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Rural Population
Sampling Studies
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aims of the present study were: 1) to estimate the prevalence of emotional, physical and sexual abuse and abuse in the health care system, and 2) to study the associations between prevalence of abuse and sociodemographic and sample variables. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used a validated postal questionnaire in four Swedish samples; patients at three gynecologic clinics with different character and in different regions (n = 2439) and women in one randomized population sample (n = 1168). RESULTS: Any lifetime emotional abuse was reported by 16.8-21.4% of the women; physical abuse by 32.1-37.5%; sexual abuse by 15.9-17.0%; and abuse in the health care system by 14.0-19.7%. For 7-8% abuse had included life threats and 9-20% of all women in the study currently suffered from their experiences of abuse. Most women had not disclosed their background of abuse to the gynecologist. There were differences in sociodemographic variables between the four samples. Generally, in the multivariate analyses we found associations between prevalence of abuse and age, educational level, civil status and occupation, but no consistent association between prevalence of abuse and sample variables. CONCLUSION: Lifetime prevalence rates of the four kinds of abuse were high in all samples as measured by the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ), and 1/10-1/5 women in the study suffered currently from abusive experiences. In multivariate analyses prevalence of abuse was consistently associated with sociodemographic but not to sample variables.
PubMed ID
14995925 View in PubMed
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The association between physical activity and forearm bone mineral density in healthy premenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49682
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):301-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Liv Berit Augestad
Berit Schei
Siri Forsmo
Arnulf Langhammer
W Dana Flanders
Author Affiliation
Program for Sport Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. liv.berit.augestad@svt.ntnu.no
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):301-13
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Bone Density
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Exercise - physiology
Female
Forearm
Humans
Motor Activity
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Physical Fitness
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Radius - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyze the association between recreational and occupational physical activity and forearm bone mineral density (BMD) in healthy premenopausal women. METHODS: During 1984-1986, a population-based health survey (HUNT 1) was conducted among women and men aged >19 years in Nord-Trøndelag county in Norway. The second, follow-up survey (HUNT 2) was conducted during 1995-1997. The subjects in this study consist of healthy premenopausal women (n = 1396)
PubMed ID
15130259 View in PubMed
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Correlates of forearm bone mineral density in young Norwegian women: the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9922
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Sep 1;156(5):418-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2002
Author
Gillian A Hawker
Siri Forsmo
Suzanne M Cadarette
Berit Schei
Susan B Jaglal
Lisa Forsén
Arnulf Langhammer
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, Women's College Ambulatory Care Centre, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. g.hawker@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Sep 1;156(5):418-27
Date
Sep-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Bone Density
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forearm
Humans
Logistic Models
Norway
Osteoporosis - etiology - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Maximizing attainment of optimal peak bone mineral density (BMD) is a potential osteoporosis prevention strategy. The main objective of this study was to identify correlates of forearm BMD in young adult women. Population-based data derived from standardized questionnaires administered to healthy women aged 19-35 years in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway (n = 963), were collected in 1995-1997. Forearm BMD was assessed by single x-ray absorptiometry. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were used to determine correlates of BMD (g/cm(2)) and lowest quintile of BMD, respectively, at the ultradistal and distal sites. The mean age and weight of the cohort were 29.7 years (standard deviation 4.7) and 68.6 kg (standard deviation 12.5), respectively. Age and weight were positively associated with BMD at both forearm sites. When data were controlled for age and weight, later age at menarche and lack of milk consumption were associated with lower BMD values. In both linear models and logistic models, none of the factors vitamin D intake, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, amenorrhea, oral contraceptive use, number of pregnancies, history of breastfeeding, and family history of osteoporosis were found to be significantly associated with BMD. Prior studies have suggested that calcium supplementation in children is useful for optimizing peak BMD. Further studies exploring the relation between lifestyle factors and BMD are warranted to search for ways to maximize attainment of peak BMD.
PubMed ID
12196311 View in PubMed
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Fertility in Norwegian women: results from a population-based health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9023
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(1):5-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Berit Rostad
Berit Schei
Johanne Sundby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. berit.rostad@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(1):5-10
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fertility
Health Surveys
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology
Life Style
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
AIMS: Reproductive behaviour has changed during the most recent decades, with increased infertility and subfertility. This study evaluated fertility, estimated the prevalence of fertility problems, and assessed possible predictors for impaired fertility. METHODS: Eligible subjects were 9,983 menopausal women participating in two health surveys. Data were collected by comprehensive questionnaires. RESULTS: Of all women 89.3% were fertile, 4.8% were subfertile, 4.1% were voluntarily childless, and 1.8% were involuntaruly childless. Impaired fertility was associated with a higher level of education and excessive alcohol intake. There were significant differences in subfertility among the parous women, with increased subfertility with decreasing age. Among the nullipara, involuntary childlessness was more prevalent in the youngest age group, while voluntary childlessness increased with advancing age. CONCLUSIONS: Fertility problems were quite common, and have increased in younger age groups, though seemingly fewer women remained childless past their reproductive age in the youngest age group.
PubMed ID
16449038 View in PubMed
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Forearm bone mineral density in an unselected population of 2,779 men and women--the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51954
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 May;16(5):562-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Siri Forsmo
Arnulf Langhammer
Lisa Forsen
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Medisinsk-teknisk senter, 7489 Trondheim, Norway. siri.forsmo@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 May;16(5):562-7
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Densitometry, X-Ray
Female
Forearm - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The fracture incidence in Norway is among the highest in Europe, presumably due to osteoporosis. As part of a multipurpose health study in the county of Nord-Trondelag, Norway (the HUNT study), a 5% randomly selected sample (n=4,646) of the population >19 years of age was invited to undergo single X-ray absorptiometry (SXA) of the forearm. A total of 1,274 men (50.5 years) and 1,505 women (49.9 years) participated (60%). The aim of the study was to describe the variation in bone mineral density (BMD) and the prevalence of forearm BMD 2.5 standard deviations (SD) below the mean value for young adults in an unselected population sample. In women the BMD remained stable until the age of 50 years, whereupon a strong decline in BMD was observed. In men, a BMD increase was observed until about the age of 40 years; the decline after the age of 65 was, however, similar to that in women. Based on age and gender-specific reference values, the age-adjusted prevalence of T-scores
PubMed ID
15448986 View in PubMed
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A history of sexual abuse and health: a Nordic multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30123
Source
BJOG. 2004 Oct;111(10):1121-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Malene Hilden
Berit Schei
Katarina Swahnberg
Erja Halmesmäki
Jens Langhoff-Roos
Kristin Offerdal
Ulla Pikarinen
Katrine Sidenius
Tora Steingrimsdottir
Hildegun Stoum-Hinsverk
Barbro Wijma
Author Affiliation
Centre for Victims of Sexual Assault, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
BJOG. 2004 Oct;111(10):1121-7
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health status
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pelvic Pain - etiology
Prevalence
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Sex Offenses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine if a history of sexual abuse is associated with objective and subjective indicators of health and if certain abusive incidents had a stronger impact on health than others. DESIGN: A cross-sectional, multicentre study. SETTING: Five gynaecological departments in the five Nordic countries. SAMPLE: Three thousand five hundred and thirty-nine gynaecology patients. METHODS: The NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ) on abuse history and current health was mailed to all patients who consented to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reason for index visit at the gynaeocological clinic as well as several questions on health were recorded. General health status was measured as self-estimated health, psychosomatic symptoms (headache, abdominal pain, muscle, weakness, dizziness), number of health care visits and number of periods on sick leave. RESULT: A history of sexual abuse was reported by 20.7% of respondents. A history of sexual abuse was significantly associated with chronic pelvic pain as reason for index visit (P
PubMed ID
15383115 View in PubMed
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Women's experiences of the gynecologic examination: factors associated with discomfort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45865
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Nov;82(11):1030-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Malene Hilden
Katrine Sidenius
Jens Langhoff-Roos
Barbro Wijma
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Glostrup University Hospital, Copenhagen/Center for Victims of Sexual Assault, H:S Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. mahi@rh.dk
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Nov;82(11):1030-6
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Genital Diseases, Female - diagnosis
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Pain - etiology - psychology
Physical Examination - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Women - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate how women experience the gynecologic examination and to assess possible factors associated with experiencing discomfort during the gynecologic examination. METHODS: Consecutive patients visiting the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Glostrup County Hospital, Denmark, were invited to participate in the study, and received a postal questionnaire that included questions about the index visit, obstetric and gynecologic history and sexual abuse history. The response rate was 80% (n = 798). The degree of discomfort during the gynecologic examination was indicated on a scale from 0 to 10. Experiencing discomfort was defined as a score of 6 or more, based on the 75th percentile. RESULTS: Discomfort during the gynecologic examination was strongly associated with a negative emotional contact with the examiner and young age. Additionally, dissatisfaction with present sexual life, a history of sexual abuse and mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and insomnia were significantly associated with discomfort. CONCLUSION: The emotional contact between patient and examiner seemed to have great importance when focusing on discomfort during the gynecologic examination. Furthermore, we found that discomfort was associated with a number of factors that are seldom known to the gynecologists, such as sexual abuse history, mental health problems and patients' sexual life. Gynecologists need to focus on the emotional contact and to reevaluate issues for communication before the examination.
PubMed ID
14616277 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.