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Adult physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and postpartum depression, a population based, prospective study of 53,065 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271850
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:316
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Marie Flem Sørbø
Hilde Grimstad
Johan Håkon Bjørngaard
Mirjam Lukasse
Berit Schei
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:316
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - epidemiology
Emotions
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Offenses - psychology
Spouse Abuse - psychology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Postpartum depression (PPD) has detrimental consequences to the women, their infants and families. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between adult abuse and PPD.
This study was based on data from 53,065 pregnant women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Women were recruited through a postal invitation in relation to a routine ultra-sound invitation at week 18 of gestation. Exposure to adult emotional, sexual, physical abuse was based on self-report at week 30, also differentiating if the perpetrator was known or a stranger, and whether the abuse was recent or not (
Notes
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PubMed ID
25199411 View in PubMed
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The association between depressive and anxiety symptoms and bone mineral density in the general population: the HUNT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138090
Source
J Affect Disord. 2011 Jun;131(1-3):164-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Lana J Williams
Ottar Bjerkeset
Arnulf Langhammer
Michael Berk
Julie A Pasco
Margaret J Henry
Berit Schei
Siri Forsmo
Author Affiliation
University of Melbourne, Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, Geelong, Australia. lanaw@barwonhealth.org.au
Source
J Affect Disord. 2011 Jun;131(1-3):164-71
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - complications - physiopathology
Bone Density
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - complications - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - etiology - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Young Adult
Abstract
Psychiatric disorders may be risk factors for reduced bone mineral density (BMD). Longitudinal evidence is limited and this is yet to be examined among community-dwelling adults with anxiety. We aimed to investigate the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between anxiety and depressive symptoms and BMD.
This study examined data from the second Nord-Trondelag Health Study (1995-1997; 1194 men and 7842 women) and a follow-up conducted in 2001 (697 men and 2751 women). Symptomatology was ascertained using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and BMD was measured at the forearm using single-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Information on medication use and lifestyle was self-reported, and these, together with anthropometric measures were tested in multivariate analyses.
In men, adjusted BMD was 2.6% lower at the ultradistal forearm for those with depressive symptoms and 2.6% lower at the ultradistal and 2.0% lower at the distal forearm for those with anxiety symptoms. In women, adjusted BMD at the distal and ultradistal forearm was lower for heavier women with depressive symptoms but this relationship diminished with decreasing weight. Forearm BMD was similar for women with or without anxiety symptoms. Longitudinally, neither depressive nor anxiety symptoms were associated with bone loss over 4.6 years.
Findings cannot be generalised to other skeletal sites and a longer follow-up period may be necessary to detect differences in bone loss.
These results indicate that depressive and anxiety symptoms are cross-sectionally associated with reduced BMD. These findings provide further evidence to support monitoring BMD in individuals diagnosed with psychiatric illness.
PubMed ID
21211851 View in PubMed
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Emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and the association with symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress in a multi-ethnic pregnant population in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281889
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Oct;9:7-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Anne-Marie Wangel
Elsa Lena Ryding
Berit Schei
Margareta Östman
Mirjam Lukasse
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Oct;9:7-13
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bullying
Child
Child Abuse
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - etiology
Depressive Disorder - etiology
Emotions
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Language
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Offenses - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aims to describe the prevalence of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and analyze associations with symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress (PTS) in pregnancy, by ethnic background.
This is a cross-sectional study of the Swedish data from the Bidens cohort study. Ethnicity was categorized as native and non-native Swedish-speakers. Women completed a questionnaire while attending routine antenatal care. The NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ) assessed a history of emotional, physical or sexual abuse. The Edinburgh Depression Scale-5 measured symptoms of depression. Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress (PTS) included intrusion, avoidance and numbness.
Of 1003 women, 78.6% were native and 21.4% were non-native Swedish-speakers. Native and non-native Swedish-speakers experienced a similar proportion of lifetime abuse. Moderate emotional and physical abuse in childhood was significantly more common among non-native Swedish-speakers. Sexual abuse in adulthood was significantly more prevalent among native Swedish-speakers. Emotional and sexual abuse were significantly associated with symptoms of depression for both natives and non-natives. Physical abuse was significantly associated with symptoms of depression for non-natives only. All types of abuse were significantly associated with symptoms of PTS for both native and non-native Swedish-speakers. Adding ethnicity to the multiple binary regression analyses did not really alter the association between the different types of abuse and symptoms of depression and PTS.
The prevalence of lifetime abuse did not differ significantly for native and non-native Swedish-speakers but there were significant differences on a more detailed level. Abuse was associated with symptoms of depression and PTS. Being a non-native Swedish-speaker did not influence the association much.
PubMed ID
27634658 View in PubMed
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Mental health status in pregnancy among native and non-native Swedish-speaking women: a Bidens study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121746
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Dec;91(12):1395-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Anne-Marie Wangel
Berit Schei
Elsa Lena Ryding
Margareta Ostman
Author Affiliation
Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö, Sweden. anne-marie.wangel@mah.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Dec;91(12):1395-401
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Depression, Postpartum - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Language
Life Change Events
Mental health
Pregnancy
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To describe mental health status in native and non-native Swedish-speaking pregnant women and explore risk factors of depression and posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms.
A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted at midwife-based antenatal clinics in Southern Sweden.
A non-selected group of women in mid-pregnancy.
Participants completed a questionnaire covering background characteristics, social support, life events, mental health variables and the short Edinburgh Depression Scale.
Depressive symptoms during the past week and PTS symptoms during the past year.
Out of 1003 women, 21.4% reported another language than Swedish as their mother tongue and were defined as non-native. These women were more likely to be younger, have fewer years of education, potential financial problems, and lack of social support. More non-native speakers self-reported depressive, PTS, anxiety and, psychosomatic symptoms, and fewer had had consultations with a psychiatrist or psychologist. Of all women, 13.8% had depressive symptoms defined by Edinburgh Depression Scale 7 or above. Non-native status was associated with statistically increased risks of depressive symptoms and having =1 PTS symptom compared with native-speaking women. Multivariate modeling including all selected factors resulted in adjusted odds ratios for depressive symptoms of 1.75 (95% confidence interval: 1.11-2.76) and of 1.56 (95% confidence interval: 1.10-2.34) for PTS symptoms in non-native Swedish speakers.
Non-native Swedish-speaking women had a more unfavorable mental health status than native speakers. In spite of this, non-native speaking women had sought less mental health care.
PubMed ID
22881599 View in PubMed
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