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Childhood abuse and fear of childbirth--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139256
Source
Birth. 2010 Dec;37(4):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Mirjam Lukasse
Siri Vangen
Pål Øian
Merethe Kumle
Elsa Lena Ryding
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø, Tromsø, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Birth. 2010 Dec;37(4):267-74
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fear
Female
Humans
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Childhood abuse affects adult health. The objective of this study was to examine the association between a self-reported history of childhood abuse and fear of childbirth.
A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted of 2,365 pregnant women at five obstetrical departments in Norway. We measured childhood abuse using the Norvold Abuse Questionnaire and fear of childbirth using the Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire. Severe fear of childbirth was defined as a Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire score of = 85.
Of all women, 566 (23.9%) had experienced any childhood abuse, 257 (10.9%) had experienced emotional abuse, 260 (11%) physical abuse, and 290 (12.3%) sexual abuse. Women with a history of childhood abuse reported severe fear of childbirth significantly more often than those without a history of childhood abuse, 18 percent versus 10 percent (p = 0.001). The association between a history of childhood abuse and severe fear of childbirth remained significant after adjustment for confounding factors for primiparas (adjusted OR: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.30-3.08) but lost its significance for multiparas (adjusted OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 0.76-1.80). The factor with the strongest association with severe fear of childbirth among multiparas was a negative birth experience (adjusted OR: 5.50; 95% CI: 3.77-8.01).
A history of childhood abuse significantly increased the risk of experiencing severe fear of childbirth among primiparas. Fear of childbirth among multiparas was most strongly associated with a negative birth experience.
PubMed ID
21083717 View in PubMed
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Factors related to a negative birth experience - A mixed methods study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291624
Source
Midwifery. 2017 Aug; 51:33-39
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Lena Henriksen
Elisabeth Grimsrud
Berit Schei
Mirjam Lukasse
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, P.O. Box 4 St. Olavs plass, 0130 Oslo, Norway; Division of General Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Oslo University Hospital, P.O Box 4950 Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: lena.henriksen@hioa.no.
Source
Midwifery. 2017 Aug; 51:33-39
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Life Change Events
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Qualitative Research
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - etiology - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
this study aimed to explore factors associated with a negative childbirth experience including descriptions from women themselves.
we performed a mixed methods study based on data from the Norwegian cohort of the Bidens study, including a total of 1352 multiparous women. Quantitative information was analysed in addition to thematic analysis of 103 free-text comments provided by women with a prior negative childbirth experience.
the total prevalence of a negative birth experience was 21.1%. A negative experience was associated with fear of birth (AOR: 5.00 95% CI 3.40-7.23) and a history of abuse (AOR 1.34 95% CI 1.01-1.79) in multivariate analysis. Women who indicated they were para 2 were less likely or report a negative childbirth (AOR 0.66 95% CI 0.46-0.94). Three major themes were identified: 'complications for mother, child or both', 'not being seen or heard'; and 'experience of pain and loss of control'. The majority of respondents reported experiences of unexpected and dramatic complications during childbirth. Further, several of the respondents felt a lack of support, that they had not been treated with respect or included in decisions regarding their birth. A minority described pain and loss of control as the main reason for their negative birth experience.
comments by the women show that they were unprepared for complications and inadequate care during birth. The feeling of not being seen or heard during childbirth contributed to a negative experience. Midwives can use the information gained from this study to prevent negative birth experiences.
PubMed ID
28528179 View in PubMed
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Fear of childbirth, women's preference for cesarean section and childhood abuse: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137513
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2011 Jan;90(1):33-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Mirjam Lukasse
Siri Vangen
Pål Øian
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø, Norway. Mirjam.lukasse@ism.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2011 Jan;90(1):33-40
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Norway
Parity
Parturition - psychology
Patient Preference - psychology
Pregnancy
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the association between childhood abuse and fear of childbirth and the wish for cesarean section during second pregnancy.
A longitudinal cohort study using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
Fifty maternity units in Norway, 1999-2006.
We included 4,876 women who participated in the MoBa study during their first and second pregnancy.
Postal questionnaires at 18 and 30 weeks' gestation and 6 months postpartum linked to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway.
Associations between childhood abuse and women's fear of childbirth and preference for cesarean section during second pregnancy were assessed using regression analyses, adjusting for confounding factors such as mode of delivery and birth experience of first pregnancy.
Of 4,876 women, 1,023 (21%) reported some form of childhood abuse. Compared to women without a history of childhood abuse, childhood-abused women more frequently reported fear of childbirth (23% vs. 15%, p
PubMed ID
21275913 View in PubMed
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Lifetime sexual violence and childbirth expectations - A Norwegian population based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282837
Source
Midwifery. 2016 May;36:14-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Lena Henriksen
Berit Schei
Mirjam Lukasse
Source
Midwifery. 2016 May;36:14-20
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - etiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Fear
Female
Humans
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Parturition - psychology
Perception
Pregnancy
Sex Offenses - psychology
Social Class
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
this study aimed to explore the association between lifetime sexual violence and expectations about childbirth.
Norwegian population-based cohort study.
women presenting for routine ultrasound examinations were recruited to the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study between 1999 and 2008.
78,660 pregnant women.
sexual violence and expectations about childbirth were self-reported during pregnancy using postal questionnaires. Risk estimations were performed using multivariable logistic regression analysis and stratified by parity.
fear of childbirth, the thoughts about pain relief, worries about the infant's health and looking forward to the arrival of the infant.
of 78,660 women, 18.4% reported a history of sexual violence and 0.9% were exposed to sexual violence within the last 12 months, including during the current pregnancy. We found that nulliparous women who reported previous or recent sexual violence had a decrease in the odds of looking forward to the arrival of the infant with an AOR of 0.8 (95% CI 0.7-0.9) and 0.4 (95% CI 0.3-0.6), respectively, compared to non-abused women. The same pattern was observed among multiparous women and they were more likely to report worries about the infant's health. Severe sexual violence (rape) was associated with concerns about childbirth, especially for nulliparous women that were more likely to express fear of birth, a hope for a pain-free birth, a desire for caesarean section and worries about the infant's health than non-exposed women.
women with a lifetime exposure to sexual violence, both past experiences and within the last 12 months, were less likely to look forward to the arrival of the infant than non-exposed women, and they were more likely to worry about the infant's health. Women with experiences of severe sexual violence (rape) had more concerns about childbirth than women without this experience. This finding shows that exploring women's attitudes toward childbirth may work as an approach when examining exposure to violence.
PubMed ID
27106939 View in PubMed
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Pregnant women's preference for cesarean section and subsequent mode of birth - a six-country cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287877
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2016 Sep;37(3):75-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Elsa Lena Ryding
Mirjam Lukasse
Hildur Kristjansdottir
Thora Steingrimsdottir
Berit Schei
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2016 Sep;37(3):75-83
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Belgium
Cesarean Section - psychology
Denmark
Estonia
Fear - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Iceland
Norway
Parity
Parturition - psychology
Patient Preference - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The rate of cesarean section (CS) for non-medical reasons has risen and it is a concern for health care. Women's preferences may vary across countries for psychosocial or obstetric reasons.
A prospective cohort study of 6549 women in routine antenatal care giving birth in Belgium, Iceland, Denmark, Estonia, Norway or Sweden. Preference for mode of birth was self-reported in mid-pregnancy. Birth outcome data were collected from hospital records.
A CS was preferred by 3.5% of primiparous women and 8.7% of the multiparous women. Preference for CS was associated with severe fear of childbirth (FOC), with a negative birth experience in multiparous women and with depressive symptoms in the primiparous. Women were somewhat more prone to prefer a cesarean in Iceland, odd ratio (OR) 1.70 (1.02-2.83), adjusted for age, education, depression, FOC, history of abuse, previous cesarean and negative birth experience. Out of the 404 women who preferred CS during pregnancy, 286 (70.8%) delivered by CS, mostly for a medical indication. A total of 9% of the cesareans in the cohort had a non-medical indication only.
Women's preference for CS often seems to be due to health concerns. Both medical and psychological factors need to be addressed in antenatal counseling. Obstetricians need to convey accurately to women the risks and benefits of CS in her specific case. Maternity professionals should identify and explore psychosocial reasons for women's preferences.
PubMed ID
27269591 View in PubMed
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Women's preference for caesarean section and the actual mode of delivery - Comparing five sites in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295484
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2018 Jun; 16:206-212
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Elin Marie Lindstad Løvåsmoen
Mari Nyland Bjørgo
Mirjam Lukasse
Berit Schei
Lena Henriksen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, P.O. Box 4 St. Olavs plass, 0130 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: EILV@vestreviken.no.
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2018 Jun; 16:206-212
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety
Cesarean Section - psychology
Choice Behavior
Delivery, Obstetric - psychology
Depression - complications
Educational Status
Fear
Female
Hospitals
Humans
Norway
Parity
Parturition - psychology
Patient Preference
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - psychology
Pregnant Women
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The caesarean (CS) section rate varies among hospitals in Norway, and little is known about whether this is influenced by women's preferences. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in women's preferred mode of delivery during pregnancy between five hospitals in Norway, and to relate this to the actual mode of delivery.
A prospective cohort study of 2,177 unselected pregnant women in five hospitals in Norway. Women were recruited at their standard ultrasound examinations, and data was collected through questionnaires and electronic patient charts. The exposure was a CS preference and the main outcome measure was the actual mode of delivery.
In total, 3.5% of the primiparous women and 9.6% of the multiparous women reported a preference for CS. This was associated with fear of childbirth and education between 10 and 13?years in both groups, symptoms of depression and an age over 35?years old among the primiparous women, and a previous CS and/or negative birth experience among the multiparous. The multiparous women in Drammen and Tromsø were less likely to prefer a CS, and none of the primiparous women in Tromsø preferred a CS. A total of 67.8% of those who preferred a CS gave birth with this mode of delivery.
There were significant differences between the hospitals according to the CS preference. This preference was associated with the previous obstetric history and psychological factors. Therefore, creating good birth experiences and offering women counselling may reduce the CS preference rate.
PubMed ID
29804768 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.