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Are sociodemographic and regional and sample factors associated with prevalence of abuse?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71122
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Mar;83(3):276-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Katarina Swahnberg
Barbro Wijma
Berit Schei
Malene Hilden
Kirstine Irminger
Gun B Wingren
Author Affiliation
Division of Women's Health, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. katsw@imk.liu.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Mar;83(3):276-88
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Attitude of Health Personnel
Battered Women - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gynecology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Probability
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Rural Population
Sampling Studies
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aims of the present study were: 1) to estimate the prevalence of emotional, physical and sexual abuse and abuse in the health care system, and 2) to study the associations between prevalence of abuse and sociodemographic and sample variables. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used a validated postal questionnaire in four Swedish samples; patients at three gynecologic clinics with different character and in different regions (n = 2439) and women in one randomized population sample (n = 1168). RESULTS: Any lifetime emotional abuse was reported by 16.8-21.4% of the women; physical abuse by 32.1-37.5%; sexual abuse by 15.9-17.0%; and abuse in the health care system by 14.0-19.7%. For 7-8% abuse had included life threats and 9-20% of all women in the study currently suffered from their experiences of abuse. Most women had not disclosed their background of abuse to the gynecologist. There were differences in sociodemographic variables between the four samples. Generally, in the multivariate analyses we found associations between prevalence of abuse and age, educational level, civil status and occupation, but no consistent association between prevalence of abuse and sample variables. CONCLUSION: Lifetime prevalence rates of the four kinds of abuse were high in all samples as measured by the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ), and 1/10-1/5 women in the study suffered currently from abusive experiences. In multivariate analyses prevalence of abuse was consistently associated with sociodemographic but not to sample variables.
PubMed ID
14995925 View in PubMed
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The association between depressive and anxiety symptoms and bone mineral density in the general population: the HUNT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138090
Source
J Affect Disord. 2011 Jun;131(1-3):164-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Lana J Williams
Ottar Bjerkeset
Arnulf Langhammer
Michael Berk
Julie A Pasco
Margaret J Henry
Berit Schei
Siri Forsmo
Author Affiliation
University of Melbourne, Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, Geelong, Australia. lanaw@barwonhealth.org.au
Source
J Affect Disord. 2011 Jun;131(1-3):164-71
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - complications - physiopathology
Bone Density
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - complications - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - etiology - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Young Adult
Abstract
Psychiatric disorders may be risk factors for reduced bone mineral density (BMD). Longitudinal evidence is limited and this is yet to be examined among community-dwelling adults with anxiety. We aimed to investigate the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between anxiety and depressive symptoms and BMD.
This study examined data from the second Nord-Trondelag Health Study (1995-1997; 1194 men and 7842 women) and a follow-up conducted in 2001 (697 men and 2751 women). Symptomatology was ascertained using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and BMD was measured at the forearm using single-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Information on medication use and lifestyle was self-reported, and these, together with anthropometric measures were tested in multivariate analyses.
In men, adjusted BMD was 2.6% lower at the ultradistal forearm for those with depressive symptoms and 2.6% lower at the ultradistal and 2.0% lower at the distal forearm for those with anxiety symptoms. In women, adjusted BMD at the distal and ultradistal forearm was lower for heavier women with depressive symptoms but this relationship diminished with decreasing weight. Forearm BMD was similar for women with or without anxiety symptoms. Longitudinally, neither depressive nor anxiety symptoms were associated with bone loss over 4.6 years.
Findings cannot be generalised to other skeletal sites and a longer follow-up period may be necessary to detect differences in bone loss.
These results indicate that depressive and anxiety symptoms are cross-sectionally associated with reduced BMD. These findings provide further evidence to support monitoring BMD in individuals diagnosed with psychiatric illness.
PubMed ID
21211851 View in PubMed
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Childhood abuse and fear of childbirth--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139256
Source
Birth. 2010 Dec;37(4):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Mirjam Lukasse
Siri Vangen
Pål Øian
Merethe Kumle
Elsa Lena Ryding
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø, Tromsø, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Birth. 2010 Dec;37(4):267-74
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fear
Female
Humans
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Childhood abuse affects adult health. The objective of this study was to examine the association between a self-reported history of childhood abuse and fear of childbirth.
A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted of 2,365 pregnant women at five obstetrical departments in Norway. We measured childhood abuse using the Norvold Abuse Questionnaire and fear of childbirth using the Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire. Severe fear of childbirth was defined as a Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire score of = 85.
Of all women, 566 (23.9%) had experienced any childhood abuse, 257 (10.9%) had experienced emotional abuse, 260 (11%) physical abuse, and 290 (12.3%) sexual abuse. Women with a history of childhood abuse reported severe fear of childbirth significantly more often than those without a history of childhood abuse, 18 percent versus 10 percent (p = 0.001). The association between a history of childhood abuse and severe fear of childbirth remained significant after adjustment for confounding factors for primiparas (adjusted OR: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.30-3.08) but lost its significance for multiparas (adjusted OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 0.76-1.80). The factor with the strongest association with severe fear of childbirth among multiparas was a negative birth experience (adjusted OR: 5.50; 95% CI: 3.77-8.01).
A history of childhood abuse significantly increased the risk of experiencing severe fear of childbirth among primiparas. Fear of childbirth among multiparas was most strongly associated with a negative birth experience.
PubMed ID
21083717 View in PubMed
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Childhood violence and mental health among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299332
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Berit Schei
Tore Sørlie
Hein Stigum
Espen Bjertness
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
a Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Abuse (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF , Karasjok , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health - ethnology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - ethnology
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
Violence - ethnology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and psychological distress and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTS) among Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore a possible mediating effect of childhood violence on any ethnic differences in mental health. This study is part of a larger questionnaire survey on health and living conditions in Mid- and Northern Norway (SAMINOR 2) which included 2116 Sami and 8674 non-Sami participants. A positive association between childhood violence and psychological distress and PTS in adulthood was found regardless of ethnicity. For women, childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences in psychological distress (53.2%) and PTS (31.4%). A similar pattern was found for men as to psychological distress (45.5%) and PTS (55.5%). The prevalence of psychological distress was significantly higher in the Sami than in the non-Sami group: 15.8% vs. 13.0% for women, and 11.4% vs. 8.0% for men. Likewise, PTS showed a higher prevalence in the Sami group, both for women (16.2% vs. 12.4%) and for men (12.2% vs. 9.1).
A positive association between childhood violence and adult mental distress was found for both Sami and Norwegian adults. More mental problems were found among the Sami. Childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences.
PubMed ID
30112962 View in PubMed
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Correlates of forearm bone mineral density in young Norwegian women: the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9922
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Sep 1;156(5):418-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2002
Author
Gillian A Hawker
Siri Forsmo
Suzanne M Cadarette
Berit Schei
Susan B Jaglal
Lisa Forsén
Arnulf Langhammer
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, Women's College Ambulatory Care Centre, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. g.hawker@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Sep 1;156(5):418-27
Date
Sep-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Bone Density
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forearm
Humans
Logistic Models
Norway
Osteoporosis - etiology - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Maximizing attainment of optimal peak bone mineral density (BMD) is a potential osteoporosis prevention strategy. The main objective of this study was to identify correlates of forearm BMD in young adult women. Population-based data derived from standardized questionnaires administered to healthy women aged 19-35 years in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway (n = 963), were collected in 1995-1997. Forearm BMD was assessed by single x-ray absorptiometry. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were used to determine correlates of BMD (g/cm(2)) and lowest quintile of BMD, respectively, at the ultradistal and distal sites. The mean age and weight of the cohort were 29.7 years (standard deviation 4.7) and 68.6 kg (standard deviation 12.5), respectively. Age and weight were positively associated with BMD at both forearm sites. When data were controlled for age and weight, later age at menarche and lack of milk consumption were associated with lower BMD values. In both linear models and logistic models, none of the factors vitamin D intake, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, amenorrhea, oral contraceptive use, number of pregnancies, history of breastfeeding, and family history of osteoporosis were found to be significantly associated with BMD. Prior studies have suggested that calcium supplementation in children is useful for optimizing peak BMD. Further studies exploring the relation between lifestyle factors and BMD are warranted to search for ways to maximize attainment of peak BMD.
PubMed ID
12196311 View in PubMed
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Emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and the association with symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress in a multi-ethnic pregnant population in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281889
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Oct;9:7-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Anne-Marie Wangel
Elsa Lena Ryding
Berit Schei
Margareta Östman
Mirjam Lukasse
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Oct;9:7-13
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bullying
Child
Child Abuse
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - etiology
Depressive Disorder - etiology
Emotions
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Language
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Offenses - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aims to describe the prevalence of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and analyze associations with symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress (PTS) in pregnancy, by ethnic background.
This is a cross-sectional study of the Swedish data from the Bidens cohort study. Ethnicity was categorized as native and non-native Swedish-speakers. Women completed a questionnaire while attending routine antenatal care. The NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ) assessed a history of emotional, physical or sexual abuse. The Edinburgh Depression Scale-5 measured symptoms of depression. Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress (PTS) included intrusion, avoidance and numbness.
Of 1003 women, 78.6% were native and 21.4% were non-native Swedish-speakers. Native and non-native Swedish-speakers experienced a similar proportion of lifetime abuse. Moderate emotional and physical abuse in childhood was significantly more common among non-native Swedish-speakers. Sexual abuse in adulthood was significantly more prevalent among native Swedish-speakers. Emotional and sexual abuse were significantly associated with symptoms of depression for both natives and non-natives. Physical abuse was significantly associated with symptoms of depression for non-natives only. All types of abuse were significantly associated with symptoms of PTS for both native and non-native Swedish-speakers. Adding ethnicity to the multiple binary regression analyses did not really alter the association between the different types of abuse and symptoms of depression and PTS.
The prevalence of lifetime abuse did not differ significantly for native and non-native Swedish-speakers but there were significant differences on a more detailed level. Abuse was associated with symptoms of depression and PTS. Being a non-native Swedish-speaker did not influence the association much.
PubMed ID
27634658 View in PubMed
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Experiences of physical and sexual abuse and their implications for current health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163854
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2007 May;109(5):1116-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Ulla Pikarinen
Terhi Saisto
Berit Schei
Katarina Swahnberg
Erja Halmesmäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, South Karelian Central Hospital, Lappeenranta, Finland. ulla.pikarinen@fimnet.fi
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2007 May;109(5):1116-22
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Domestic Violence - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genital Diseases, Female - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Physician-Patient Relations
Prevalence
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To estimate the prevalence of a history of physical and sexual abuse in adulthood among gynecological patients and the association with general and reproductive health.
A cross-sectional questionnaire study on abusive experiences of gynecologic outpatients in a tertiary hospital. The total sample size was 691.
Of all women, 42.4% had experienced moderate or severe physical or sexual abuse as an adult. One hundred forty-seven (21.6%) women reported physical abuse, 84 (12.3%) sexual abuse, and 58 (8.5%) both. The abused and nonabused women did not differ in mean age, education, or parity. Sexually abused women and those who were both sexually and physically abused reported poor general health significantly more often (P=.005 and P=.001, respectively) than the nonabused. They also rated their sex life as significantly worse than the nonabused women (P=.002 and P=.012, respectively). Over half of abused women had experienced common physical complaints during the previous 12 months compared with one third of the nonabused (P
PubMed ID
17470592 View in PubMed
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Fertility in Norwegian women: results from a population-based health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9023
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(1):5-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Berit Rostad
Berit Schei
Johanne Sundby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. berit.rostad@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(1):5-10
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fertility
Health Surveys
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology
Life Style
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
AIMS: Reproductive behaviour has changed during the most recent decades, with increased infertility and subfertility. This study evaluated fertility, estimated the prevalence of fertility problems, and assessed possible predictors for impaired fertility. METHODS: Eligible subjects were 9,983 menopausal women participating in two health surveys. Data were collected by comprehensive questionnaires. RESULTS: Of all women 89.3% were fertile, 4.8% were subfertile, 4.1% were voluntarily childless, and 1.8% were involuntaruly childless. Impaired fertility was associated with a higher level of education and excessive alcohol intake. There were significant differences in subfertility among the parous women, with increased subfertility with decreasing age. Among the nullipara, involuntary childlessness was more prevalent in the youngest age group, while voluntary childlessness increased with advancing age. CONCLUSIONS: Fertility problems were quite common, and have increased in younger age groups, though seemingly fewer women remained childless past their reproductive age in the youngest age group.
PubMed ID
16449038 View in PubMed
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Forearm bone mineral density in an unselected population of 2,779 men and women--the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51954
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 May;16(5):562-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Siri Forsmo
Arnulf Langhammer
Lisa Forsen
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Medisinsk-teknisk senter, 7489 Trondheim, Norway. siri.forsmo@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 May;16(5):562-7
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Densitometry, X-Ray
Female
Forearm - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The fracture incidence in Norway is among the highest in Europe, presumably due to osteoporosis. As part of a multipurpose health study in the county of Nord-Trondelag, Norway (the HUNT study), a 5% randomly selected sample (n=4,646) of the population >19 years of age was invited to undergo single X-ray absorptiometry (SXA) of the forearm. A total of 1,274 men (50.5 years) and 1,505 women (49.9 years) participated (60%). The aim of the study was to describe the variation in bone mineral density (BMD) and the prevalence of forearm BMD 2.5 standard deviations (SD) below the mean value for young adults in an unselected population sample. In women the BMD remained stable until the age of 50 years, whereupon a strong decline in BMD was observed. In men, a BMD increase was observed until about the age of 40 years; the decline after the age of 65 was, however, similar to that in women. Based on age and gender-specific reference values, the age-adjusted prevalence of T-scores
PubMed ID
15448986 View in PubMed
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Has fertility declined from mid-1990s to mid-2000s?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108597
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Nov;92(11):1284-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Berit Rostad
Lone Schmidt
Johanne Sundby
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Nov;92(11):1284-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Birth Rate - trends
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fertility
Health Surveys
Humans
Infertility - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess changes in self-reported fertility from the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s.
The study is a retrospective population-based study.
The study applied a dataset from two cross-sectional surveys conducted in the mid-1990s and some 10 years later, inviting all women in a county in Norway.
Women aged 50-59 years enrolled in either survey constituted two cohorts. Data on 4468 women in the first survey (Cohort 1940) and 4951 women in the latter survey (Cohort 1950) were collected by structured questionnaires.
Prevalence of fertility, infertility with subcategories subfertility and involuntary childlessness, as well as childlessness was estimated and compared between the surveys. Possible sociodemographic and lifestyle predictors of fertility were assessed at different points in time.
Fertility declined over the two successive surveys; 87.8% of the women in Cohort 1940 were fertile compared with 84.2% of the women in Cohort 1950 (p = 0.000). The prevalence of infertility increased over time due to an increase in subfertility from 7.8 to 10.6% (p = 0.000). The level of education increased with time, as did at-risk alcohol consumption and smoking, and these factors were adversely associated with fertility. The proportion of childless women increased across surveys (p = 0.004) but relatively fewer women were involuntarily childless in Cohort 1950 than in Cohort 1940 (p = 0.543).
Fertility, measured at 10-year intervals, declined significantly. The decline in fertility was related to changes in subfertility. Adjustments for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors did not fully explain the decline in fertility.
PubMed ID
23869705 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.