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Hip fractures in Norway 1999-2008: time trends in total incidence and second hip fracture rates: a NOREPOS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121878
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;27(10):807-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Tone K Omsland
Kristin Holvik
Haakon E Meyer
Jacqueline R Center
Nina Emaus
Grethe S Tell
Berit Schei
Aage Tverdal
Clara G Gjesdal
Guri Grimnes
Siri Forsmo
John A Eisman
Anne Johanne Søgaard
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, Oslo, Norway. Tone.Kristin.Omsland@fhi.no
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;27(10):807-14
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Recurrence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Declining incidences of hip fractures are reported from western countries. Norway has among the highest rates in the world. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in total hip fracture rates in Norway between 1999 and 2008 and risk of second hip fractures. All hospitalizations given a hip fracture diagnosis code (International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 9 or ICD 10) (cervical, trochanteric or subtrochanteric) in Norwegian hospitals were retrieved with accompanying surgical procedure codes and additional diagnoses. A total of 93,123 hip fractures were identified between 1999 and 2008 in persons =50 years. Annual incidences of hip fractures were calculated and tested for trends. Rates of first and second hip fractures (2006-2008) were compared. The age-standardized total incidence of hip fracture decreased by 13.4 % (95 % confidence interval (CI): 11.0-15.6) in women and 4.8 % (95 % CI: 0.7, 8.7) in men. Age-adjusted rates of second hip fractures did not change in the observation period. In those with a prior hip fracture, the age-standardized risk of a subsequent hip fracture was 2.5-fold (95 % CI: 2.5, 2.6) in women, and 4.6-fold (95 % CI: 4.5, 4.7) in men. Total hip fracture rates declined in both genders during 1999-2008, whereas rates of second hip fractures did not change.
PubMed ID
22870851 View in PubMed
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Intimate partner violence and cardiovascular risk in women: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116149
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2013 Mar;22(3):250-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Lise Eilin Stene
Geir Wenberg Jacobsen
Grete Dyb
Aage Tverdal
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. lise.stene@nkvts.unirand.no
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2013 Mar;22(3):250-8
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Spouse Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A potential link between intimate partner violence (IPV) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been suggested, yet evidence is scarce. We assessed cardiovascular risk and incident prescription of cardiovascular medication by lifetime experiences of physical and/or sexual IPV and psychological IPV alone in women.
A population-based cohort study of women aged 30-60 years was performed using cross-sectional data and clinical measurements from the Oslo Health Study (2000-2001) linked with prospective prescription records from the Norwegian Prescription Database (January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2009). We used age-standardized chi-square analyses to compare clinical characteristics by IPV cross-sectionally, and Cox proportional hazards regression to examine cardiovascular drug prescription prospectively.
Our study included 5593 women without cardiovascular disease or drug use at baseline. Altogether 751 (13.4%) women disclosed IPV experiences: 415 (7.4%) physical and/or sexual IPV and 336 (6.0 %) psychological IPV alone. Cross-sectional analyses showed that women who reported physical and/or sexual IPV and psychological IPV alone were more often smokers compared with women who reported no IPV. Physical and/or sexual violence was associated with abdominal obesity, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and elevated triglycerides. The prospective analysis showed that women who reported physical and/or sexual IPV were more likely to receive antihypertensive medication: incidence rate ratios adjusted for age were 1.27 (95% confidence interval 1.02-1.58) and 1.36 (CI 1.09-1.70) after additional adjustment for education and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. No significant differences were found for cardiovascular drugs overall or lipid modifying drugs.
Our findings indicate that clinicians should assess the cardiovascular risk of women with a history of physical and/or sexual IPV, and consider including CVD prevention measures as part of their follow-up.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23428282 View in PubMed
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Mortality following the first hip fracture in Norwegian women and men (1999-2008). A NOREPOS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258951
Source
Bone. 2014 Jun;63:81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Tone K Omsland
Nina Emaus
Grethe S Tell
Jeanette H Magnus
Luai Awad Ahmed
Kristin Holvik
Jacqueline Center
Siri Forsmo
Clara G Gjesdal
Berit Schei
Peter Vestergaard
John A Eisman
Jan A Falch
Aage Tverdal
Anne Johanne Søgaard
Haakon E Meyer
Source
Bone. 2014 Jun;63:81-6
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Abstract
Hip fractures are associated with increased mortality and their incidence in Norway is one of the highest worldwide. The aim of this nationwide study was to examine short- and long-term mortality after hip fractures, burden of disease (attributable fraction and potential years of life lost), and time trends in mortality compared to the total Norwegian population. Information on incident hip fractures between 1999 and 2008 in all persons aged 50 years and older was collected from Norwegian hospitals. Death and emigration dates of the hip fracture patients were obtained through 31 December 2010. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated and Poisson regression analyses were used for the estimation of time trends in SMRs. Among the 81,867 patients with a first hip fracture, the 1-year excess mortality was 4.6-fold higher in men, and 2.8-fold higher in women compared to the general population. Although the highest excess mortality was observed during the first two weeks post fracture, the excess risk persisted for twelve years. Mortality rates post hip fracture were higher in men compared to women in all age groups studied. In both genders aged 50 years and older, approximately 5% of the total mortality in the population was related to hip fractures. The largest proportion of the potential life-years lost was in the relatively young-old, i.e. less than 80 years. In men, the 1-year absolute mortality rates post hip fracture declined significantly between 1999 and 2008, by contrast, the mortality in women increased significantly relatively to the population mortality.
PubMed ID
24607943 View in PubMed
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