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Adult physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and postpartum depression, a population based, prospective study of 53,065 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271850
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:316
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Marie Flem Sørbø
Hilde Grimstad
Johan Håkon Bjørngaard
Mirjam Lukasse
Berit Schei
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:316
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - epidemiology
Emotions
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Offenses - psychology
Spouse Abuse - psychology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Postpartum depression (PPD) has detrimental consequences to the women, their infants and families. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between adult abuse and PPD.
This study was based on data from 53,065 pregnant women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Women were recruited through a postal invitation in relation to a routine ultra-sound invitation at week 18 of gestation. Exposure to adult emotional, sexual, physical abuse was based on self-report at week 30, also differentiating if the perpetrator was known or a stranger, and whether the abuse was recent or not (
Notes
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PubMed ID
25199411 View in PubMed
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Adult victims of sexual assault: acute medical response and police reporting among women consulting a center for victims of sexual assault.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71299
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Aug;82(8):750-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Berit Schei
Katrine Sidenius
Lene Lundvall
Gyda Lolk Ottesen
Author Affiliation
Center for Victims of Sexual Assault, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. berit.schei@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Aug;82(8):750-5
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Crime Victims - psychology - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Delivery of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Outpatient clinics, hospital - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Police - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Sex Offenses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The medical response to adult sexual assault should comprise: the collection of forensic evidence, the treatment of injuries, and follow-up counselling. In the past, victims of sexual assault reporting directly to the police may not have received this total medical care. The Copenhagen Center for Victims of Sexual Assault at Rigshospitalet, Denmark offers a 24-h service. Medical treatment and psychosocial follow up is offered independent of police reporting. The aim of this study was to assess whether adult sexual assault victims who reported to the police differed from those who did not report to the police. METHODS: Using clinical records, sociodemographics, characteristics of the assault, and type of preventive medical treatment received were obtained for 156 consecutive women consulting the Copenhagen Center (March 1st to December 31st 2000). Comparisons between characteristics of victims who reported to the police or not were determined. RESULTS: Ninety-four (60.2%) of the women reported to the police. Women who sought services within 24 h of the assault, had experienced use of force, were subjected to assault outdoors, and among whom nongenital injuries were observed were more likely to report to the police (p
PubMed ID
12848647 View in PubMed
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Are sociodemographic and regional and sample factors associated with prevalence of abuse?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71122
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Mar;83(3):276-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Katarina Swahnberg
Barbro Wijma
Berit Schei
Malene Hilden
Kirstine Irminger
Gun B Wingren
Author Affiliation
Division of Women's Health, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. katsw@imk.liu.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Mar;83(3):276-88
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Attitude of Health Personnel
Battered Women - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gynecology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Probability
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Rural Population
Sampling Studies
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aims of the present study were: 1) to estimate the prevalence of emotional, physical and sexual abuse and abuse in the health care system, and 2) to study the associations between prevalence of abuse and sociodemographic and sample variables. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used a validated postal questionnaire in four Swedish samples; patients at three gynecologic clinics with different character and in different regions (n = 2439) and women in one randomized population sample (n = 1168). RESULTS: Any lifetime emotional abuse was reported by 16.8-21.4% of the women; physical abuse by 32.1-37.5%; sexual abuse by 15.9-17.0%; and abuse in the health care system by 14.0-19.7%. For 7-8% abuse had included life threats and 9-20% of all women in the study currently suffered from their experiences of abuse. Most women had not disclosed their background of abuse to the gynecologist. There were differences in sociodemographic variables between the four samples. Generally, in the multivariate analyses we found associations between prevalence of abuse and age, educational level, civil status and occupation, but no consistent association between prevalence of abuse and sample variables. CONCLUSION: Lifetime prevalence rates of the four kinds of abuse were high in all samples as measured by the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ), and 1/10-1/5 women in the study suffered currently from abusive experiences. In multivariate analyses prevalence of abuse was consistently associated with sociodemographic but not to sample variables.
PubMed ID
14995925 View in PubMed
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Are there gender differences related to symptoms of acute myocardial infarction? A Norwegian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51751
Source
Prog Cardiovasc Nurs. 2006;21(1):14-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Mona Løvlien
Berit Schei
Eva Gjengedal
Author Affiliation
Molde University College, Norway. mona.lovlien@himolde.no
Source
Prog Cardiovasc Nurs. 2006;21(1):14-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare symptom presentation and illness behavior among women and men with acute myocardial infarction and assess various aspects that influence prehospital delay. This is a cross-sectional, retrospective study using self-reported questionnaires. The sample consisted of 82 women and men in Norway, up to 65 years of age, with first-time acute myocardial infarction between March and October 1999. The findings demonstrated that the most commonly reported symptom in both genders was chest pain. More than 90% of women and men experienced chest pain, with no difference between the genders. More women than men had nausea as well as pain located in their arms, back, jaw, and throat. More men than women attributed their symptoms to be cardiac in origin. Experiencing pain in the shoulders, attributing symptoms to be noncardiac, consulting a family member, and contacting several medical practitioners increased prehospital delay. During the year before the event, women were more likely to experience fatigue than men. The conclusion of this study is that women experienced a greater diversity of symptoms than men. Acute symptoms, interpretation of symptoms, and illness behavior may influence prehospital delay.
PubMed ID
16522964 View in PubMed
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The association between depressive and anxiety symptoms and bone mineral density in the general population: the HUNT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138090
Source
J Affect Disord. 2011 Jun;131(1-3):164-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Lana J Williams
Ottar Bjerkeset
Arnulf Langhammer
Michael Berk
Julie A Pasco
Margaret J Henry
Berit Schei
Siri Forsmo
Author Affiliation
University of Melbourne, Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, Geelong, Australia. lanaw@barwonhealth.org.au
Source
J Affect Disord. 2011 Jun;131(1-3):164-71
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - complications - physiopathology
Bone Density
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - complications - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - etiology - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Young Adult
Abstract
Psychiatric disorders may be risk factors for reduced bone mineral density (BMD). Longitudinal evidence is limited and this is yet to be examined among community-dwelling adults with anxiety. We aimed to investigate the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between anxiety and depressive symptoms and BMD.
This study examined data from the second Nord-Trondelag Health Study (1995-1997; 1194 men and 7842 women) and a follow-up conducted in 2001 (697 men and 2751 women). Symptomatology was ascertained using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and BMD was measured at the forearm using single-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Information on medication use and lifestyle was self-reported, and these, together with anthropometric measures were tested in multivariate analyses.
In men, adjusted BMD was 2.6% lower at the ultradistal forearm for those with depressive symptoms and 2.6% lower at the ultradistal and 2.0% lower at the distal forearm for those with anxiety symptoms. In women, adjusted BMD at the distal and ultradistal forearm was lower for heavier women with depressive symptoms but this relationship diminished with decreasing weight. Forearm BMD was similar for women with or without anxiety symptoms. Longitudinally, neither depressive nor anxiety symptoms were associated with bone loss over 4.6 years.
Findings cannot be generalised to other skeletal sites and a longer follow-up period may be necessary to detect differences in bone loss.
These results indicate that depressive and anxiety symptoms are cross-sectionally associated with reduced BMD. These findings provide further evidence to support monitoring BMD in individuals diagnosed with psychiatric illness.
PubMed ID
21211851 View in PubMed
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The association between physical activity and forearm bone mineral density in healthy premenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49682
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):301-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Liv Berit Augestad
Berit Schei
Siri Forsmo
Arnulf Langhammer
W Dana Flanders
Author Affiliation
Program for Sport Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. liv.berit.augestad@svt.ntnu.no
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):301-13
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Bone Density
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Exercise - physiology
Female
Forearm
Humans
Motor Activity
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Physical Fitness
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Radius - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyze the association between recreational and occupational physical activity and forearm bone mineral density (BMD) in healthy premenopausal women. METHODS: During 1984-1986, a population-based health survey (HUNT 1) was conducted among women and men aged >19 years in Nord-Trøndelag county in Norway. The second, follow-up survey (HUNT 2) was conducted during 1995-1997. The subjects in this study consist of healthy premenopausal women (n = 1396)
PubMed ID
15130259 View in PubMed
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Childhood abuse and fear of childbirth--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139256
Source
Birth. 2010 Dec;37(4):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Mirjam Lukasse
Siri Vangen
Pål Øian
Merethe Kumle
Elsa Lena Ryding
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø, Tromsø, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Birth. 2010 Dec;37(4):267-74
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fear
Female
Humans
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Childhood abuse affects adult health. The objective of this study was to examine the association between a self-reported history of childhood abuse and fear of childbirth.
A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted of 2,365 pregnant women at five obstetrical departments in Norway. We measured childhood abuse using the Norvold Abuse Questionnaire and fear of childbirth using the Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire. Severe fear of childbirth was defined as a Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire score of = 85.
Of all women, 566 (23.9%) had experienced any childhood abuse, 257 (10.9%) had experienced emotional abuse, 260 (11%) physical abuse, and 290 (12.3%) sexual abuse. Women with a history of childhood abuse reported severe fear of childbirth significantly more often than those without a history of childhood abuse, 18 percent versus 10 percent (p = 0.001). The association between a history of childhood abuse and severe fear of childbirth remained significant after adjustment for confounding factors for primiparas (adjusted OR: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.30-3.08) but lost its significance for multiparas (adjusted OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 0.76-1.80). The factor with the strongest association with severe fear of childbirth among multiparas was a negative birth experience (adjusted OR: 5.50; 95% CI: 3.77-8.01).
A history of childhood abuse significantly increased the risk of experiencing severe fear of childbirth among primiparas. Fear of childbirth among multiparas was most strongly associated with a negative birth experience.
PubMed ID
21083717 View in PubMed
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Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289285
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32798
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Berit Schei
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Tore Sørlie
Nils Fleten
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Use (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF, Karasjok, Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32798
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Chronic Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental health
Norway
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population.
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences.
The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence.
Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity.
Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27802844 View in PubMed
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Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279894
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):32798
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Berit Schei
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Tore Sørlie
Nils Fleten
Cecilie Javo
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):32798
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population. Objective The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences. Design The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence. Results Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity. Conclusion Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.
PubMed ID
28156401 View in PubMed
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62 records – page 1 of 7.