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Pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy to prevent urinary incontinence: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186745
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Feb;101(2):313-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Siv Mørkved
Kari Bø
Berit Schei
Kjell Asmund Salvesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. siv.morkved@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Feb;101(2):313-9
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle, Smooth - physiology
Odds Ratio
Pelvic Floor
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - methods
Primary Prevention
Probability
Reference Values
Sensitivity and specificity
Single-Blind Method
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Incontinence - prevention & control
Abstract
Urinary incontinence is a chronic health complaint that severely reduces quality of life. Pregnancy and vaginal delivery are main risk factors in the development of urinary incontinence. The aim of this study was to assess whether intensive pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy could prevent urinary incontinence.
We conducted a single-blind randomized controlled trial at Trondheim University Hospital and three outpatient physiotherapy clinics in a primary care setting. Three hundred one healthy nulliparous women were randomly allocated to a training (n = 148) or a control group (n = 153). The training group attended a 12-week intensive pelvic floor muscle training program during pregnancy, supervised by physiotherapists. The control group received the customary information. The primary outcome measure was self-reported symptoms of urinary incontinence. The secondary outcome measure was pelvic floor muscle strength.
At follow-up, significantly fewer women in the training group reported urinary incontinence: 48 of 148 (32%) versus 74 of 153 (48%) at 36 weeks' pregnancy (P =.007) and 29 of 148 (20%) versus 49 of 153 (32%) 3 months after delivery (P =.018). According to numbers needed to treat, intensive pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy prevented urinary incontinence in about one in six women during pregnancy and one in eight women after delivery. Pelvic floor muscle strength was significantly higher in the training group at 36 weeks' pregnancy (P =.008) and 3 months after delivery (P =.048).
Intensive pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy prevents urinary incontinence during pregnancy and after delivery. Pelvic floor muscle strength improved significantly after intensive pelvic floor muscle training.
PubMed ID
12576255 View in PubMed
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Posttraumatic stress disorder after pregnancy, labor, and delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180216
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):315-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Marsha M Cohen
Donna Ansara
Berit Schei
Noreen Stuckless
Donna E Stewart
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in Women's Health, Toronto, Canada. mmcohen@istar.ca
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):315-24
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Depression - complications - etiology
Depression, Postpartum - complications
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Mothers - psychology
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - psychology
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - complications - etiology
Women's health
Abstract
Other studies of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after birth did not include questions about prior traumatic life events. This study sought to determine if a difficult birth was associated with symptoms of PTSD as well as considering sociodemographics, history of violence, depression, social support, and traumatic life events.
New mothers were recruited on the postpartum ward of six Toronto-area hospitals (n = 253) and were interviewed by telephone 8-10 weeks postpartum (n = 200). We dichotomized the postpartum stress (PTS) into high PTS (answered "yes" to 3 or more items) or low PTS (answered "yes" to 0-2 items). We calculated the odds ratios between difficult birth, other factors, and the binary PTS variable.
Results of multivariable logistic regression revealed that no factor suggestive of a difficult birth was significantly related to high PTS scores, except having two or more maternal complications (odds ratio [OR] = 4.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-12.8). Other independent predictors of high PTS scores were depression during pregnancy (OR = 18.9, 95% CI = 5.8-62.4), having two or more traumatic life events (OR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.2-8.3), being Canadian born (OR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.3-8.1), and having higher household income (lowest income group, OR = 0.1, 95% CI = 0.02-0.5), intermediate income group OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2-0.8).
In this study, postpartum stress symptoms appeared to be related more to stressful life events and depression than to pregnancy, labor, and delivery.
PubMed ID
15130260 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood violence and mental health among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294377
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Berit Schei
Tore Sørlie
Hein Stigum
Espen Bjertness
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
a Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Abuse (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF , Karasjok , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and psychological distress and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTS) among Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore a possible mediating effect of childhood violence on any ethnic differences in mental health. This study is part of a larger questionnaire survey on health and living conditions in Mid- and Northern Norway (SAMINOR 2) which included 2116 Sami and 8674 non-Sami participants. A positive association between childhood violence and psychological distress and PTS in adulthood was found regardless of ethnicity. For women, childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences in psychological distress (53.2%) and PTS (31.4%). A similar pattern was found for men as to psychological distress (45.5%) and PTS (55.5%). The prevalence of psychological distress was significantly higher in the Sami than in the non-Sami group: 15.8% vs. 13.0% for women, and 11.4% vs. 8.0% for men. Likewise, PTS showed a higher prevalence in the Sami group, both for women (16.2% vs. 12.4%) and for men (12.2% vs. 9.1).
A positive association between childhood violence and adult mental distress was found for both Sami and Norwegian adults. More mental problems were found among the Sami. Childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30112962 View in PubMed
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Intimate partner violence and cardiovascular risk in women: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116149
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2013 Mar;22(3):250-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Lise Eilin Stene
Geir Wenberg Jacobsen
Grete Dyb
Aage Tverdal
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. lise.stene@nkvts.unirand.no
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2013 Mar;22(3):250-8
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Spouse Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A potential link between intimate partner violence (IPV) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been suggested, yet evidence is scarce. We assessed cardiovascular risk and incident prescription of cardiovascular medication by lifetime experiences of physical and/or sexual IPV and psychological IPV alone in women.
A population-based cohort study of women aged 30-60 years was performed using cross-sectional data and clinical measurements from the Oslo Health Study (2000-2001) linked with prospective prescription records from the Norwegian Prescription Database (January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2009). We used age-standardized chi-square analyses to compare clinical characteristics by IPV cross-sectionally, and Cox proportional hazards regression to examine cardiovascular drug prescription prospectively.
Our study included 5593 women without cardiovascular disease or drug use at baseline. Altogether 751 (13.4%) women disclosed IPV experiences: 415 (7.4%) physical and/or sexual IPV and 336 (6.0 %) psychological IPV alone. Cross-sectional analyses showed that women who reported physical and/or sexual IPV and psychological IPV alone were more often smokers compared with women who reported no IPV. Physical and/or sexual violence was associated with abdominal obesity, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and elevated triglycerides. The prospective analysis showed that women who reported physical and/or sexual IPV were more likely to receive antihypertensive medication: incidence rate ratios adjusted for age were 1.27 (95% confidence interval 1.02-1.58) and 1.36 (CI 1.09-1.70) after additional adjustment for education and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. No significant differences were found for cardiovascular drugs overall or lipid modifying drugs.
Our findings indicate that clinicians should assess the cardiovascular risk of women with a history of physical and/or sexual IPV, and consider including CVD prevention measures as part of their follow-up.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23428282 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mortality following the first hip fracture in Norwegian women and men (1999-2008). A NOREPOS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258951
Source
Bone. 2014 Jun;63:81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Tone K Omsland
Nina Emaus
Grethe S Tell
Jeanette H Magnus
Luai Awad Ahmed
Kristin Holvik
Jacqueline Center
Siri Forsmo
Clara G Gjesdal
Berit Schei
Peter Vestergaard
John A Eisman
Jan A Falch
Aage Tverdal
Anne Johanne Søgaard
Haakon E Meyer
Source
Bone. 2014 Jun;63:81-6
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Abstract
Hip fractures are associated with increased mortality and their incidence in Norway is one of the highest worldwide. The aim of this nationwide study was to examine short- and long-term mortality after hip fractures, burden of disease (attributable fraction and potential years of life lost), and time trends in mortality compared to the total Norwegian population. Information on incident hip fractures between 1999 and 2008 in all persons aged 50 years and older was collected from Norwegian hospitals. Death and emigration dates of the hip fracture patients were obtained through 31 December 2010. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated and Poisson regression analyses were used for the estimation of time trends in SMRs. Among the 81,867 patients with a first hip fracture, the 1-year excess mortality was 4.6-fold higher in men, and 2.8-fold higher in women compared to the general population. Although the highest excess mortality was observed during the first two weeks post fracture, the excess risk persisted for twelve years. Mortality rates post hip fracture were higher in men compared to women in all age groups studied. In both genders aged 50 years and older, approximately 5% of the total mortality in the population was related to hip fractures. The largest proportion of the potential life-years lost was in the relatively young-old, i.e. less than 80 years. In men, the 1-year absolute mortality rates post hip fracture declined significantly between 1999 and 2008, by contrast, the mortality in women increased significantly relatively to the population mortality.
PubMed ID
24607943 View in PubMed
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Women's experiences of the gynecologic examination: factors associated with discomfort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45865
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Nov;82(11):1030-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Malene Hilden
Katrine Sidenius
Jens Langhoff-Roos
Barbro Wijma
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Glostrup University Hospital, Copenhagen/Center for Victims of Sexual Assault, H:S Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. mahi@rh.dk
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Nov;82(11):1030-6
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Genital Diseases, Female - diagnosis
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Pain - etiology - psychology
Physical Examination - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Women - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate how women experience the gynecologic examination and to assess possible factors associated with experiencing discomfort during the gynecologic examination. METHODS: Consecutive patients visiting the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Glostrup County Hospital, Denmark, were invited to participate in the study, and received a postal questionnaire that included questions about the index visit, obstetric and gynecologic history and sexual abuse history. The response rate was 80% (n = 798). The degree of discomfort during the gynecologic examination was indicated on a scale from 0 to 10. Experiencing discomfort was defined as a score of 6 or more, based on the 75th percentile. RESULTS: Discomfort during the gynecologic examination was strongly associated with a negative emotional contact with the examiner and young age. Additionally, dissatisfaction with present sexual life, a history of sexual abuse and mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and insomnia were significantly associated with discomfort. CONCLUSION: The emotional contact between patient and examiner seemed to have great importance when focusing on discomfort during the gynecologic examination. Furthermore, we found that discomfort was associated with a number of factors that are seldom known to the gynecologists, such as sexual abuse history, mental health problems and patients' sexual life. Gynecologists need to focus on the emotional contact and to reevaluate issues for communication before the examination.
PubMed ID
14616277 View in PubMed
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Sexual violence and antenatal hospitalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105585
Source
Birth. 2013 Dec;40(4):281-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Lena Henriksen
Siri Vangen
Berit Schei
Mirjam Lukasse
Author Affiliation
Oslo University Hospital, Section of Obstetrics at the Woman and Children's Division, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Birth. 2013 Dec;40(4):281-8
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies have shown the negative impact sexual violence has on pregnancy outcome, yet the impact on antenatal hospitalization has been poorly examined. The aim of this study was to investigate if a history of sexual violence was associated with hospitalization during pregnancy.
A population-based national cohort study conducted by the Institute of Public Health, The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study. Women filled out questionnaires at 17 and 30 weeks' gestation. History of sexual violence was reported at three levels: pressured to sexual acts (mild), forced with violence (moderate), and raped (severe). The comparison group did not report sexual violence. Differences were assessed using Pearson's X(2) tests and logistic regression analyses.
Of 78,660 women, 12.0% were pressured to sexual acts, 2.8% forced with violence, and 3.6% reported rape. A history of sexual violence was associated with significantly more hospitalizations during pregnancy, 6.6 percent for mild, 8.7 percent for moderate and 12.5 percent for severe, compared to 5.8 percent for no sexual violence. Women were significantly more often admitted for hyperemesis, bleeding, threatening preterm birth, other reasons and admitted without giving any reason. Reporting severe sexual violence had an AOR for being hospitalized with hyperemesis or threatening preterm birth of 1.9 (95% CI 1.4-2.5), and 1.9 (1.3-2.7) respectively. Similarly, severe sexual violence was associated with being admitted more than once during pregnancy AOR 1.9 (1.3-2.7).
Women with a history of sexual violence reported significantly more antenatal hospitalizations during pregnancy than women without such a history.
PubMed ID
24344709 View in PubMed
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Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279894
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):32798
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Berit Schei
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Tore Sørlie
Nils Fleten
Cecilie Javo
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):32798
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population. Objective The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences. Design The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence. Results Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity. Conclusion Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.
PubMed ID
28156401 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277368
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:32798
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Berit Schei
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Tore Sørlie
Nils Fleten
Cecilie Javo
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:32798
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population.
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences.
The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence.
Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity.
Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.
PubMed ID
27802844 View in PubMed
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Erratum to: The influence of birth weight and length on bone mineral density and content in adolescence: The Tromsø Study, Fit Futures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283912
Source
Arch Osteoporos. 2017 Dec;12(1):62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2017

62 records – page 1 of 7.