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Angiographically-assessed coronary artery disease associates with HDL particle size in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123466
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Aug;223(2):359-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Patricia Blackburn
Isabelle Lemieux
Benoît Lamarche
Jean Bergeron
Patrice Perron
Gérald Tremblay
Daniel Gaudet
Jean-Pierre Després
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Québec (Québec), Canada.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Aug;223(2):359-64
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - radiography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electrophoresis
Female
Humans
Hypertriglyceridemia - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Logistic Models
Metabolic Syndrome X - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Particle Size
Phenotype
Predictive value of tests
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Waist Circumference
Abstract
It has been suggested that a reduced HDL particle size could be another feature of the atherogenic dyslipidemia found among viscerally obese subjects.
To investigate, in women, the relationship between HDL particle size and coronary artery disease (CAD).
Average HDL particle size was measured in a sample of 239 women on whom CAD was assessed by angiography.
Overall, women who had CAD were characterized by a deteriorated fasting metabolic risk profile, which was accompanied by smaller HDL particles compared to women without CAD (80.4???2.2?? vs. 81.5???2.7??, p?
PubMed ID
22695528 View in PubMed
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Association of fibrinogen and lipoprotein(a) as a coronary heart disease risk factor in men (The Quebec Cardiovascular Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191010
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2002 Mar 15;89(6):662-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2002
Author
Bernard Cantin
Jean Pierre Després
Benoît Lamarche
Sital Moorjani
Paul J Lupien
Peter Bogaty
Jean Bergeron
Gilles R Dagenais
Author Affiliation
Quebec Heart Institute, Ste-Foy, Quebec, Canada. Clajoie@sympatico.ca
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2002 Mar 15;89(6):662-6
Date
Mar-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Disease - blood
Fibrinogen - metabolism
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lipoprotein(a) - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Fibrinogen has been prospectively found to correlate with coronary heart disease (CHD) but a similar association has not been well established for lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)). Plasma lipids, Lp(a), and fibrinogen levels were measured in 2,125 men (aged 47 to 76 years) who were free of clinical CHD. During a 5-year follow-up period, 116 first CHD events were documented. Men with CHD were older, smoked more, had a higher prevalence of diabetes, and higher levels of systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, Lp(a), and fibrinogen, and lower plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Only fibrinogen levels in the upper tertile of the distribution compared with the lower tertiles were associated with a significant risk of CHD (adjusted risk ratio 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4 to 4.2; p = 0.0010). Such an association was not observed with Lp(a). To assess a possible relation between fibrinogen and Lp(a) to the risk of CHD events, men were assigned to 1 of 4 groups according to fibrinogen median levels and a Lp(a) cut-off level of 300 mg/L: group 1: fibrinogen or =300 mg/L; group 3: fibrinogen > or =4.05 g/L and Lp(a) or =4.05 g/L and Lp(a) > or =300 mg/L. Using group 1 as a reference, a significant risk ratio was only documented in group 4 (2.5; 95% CI 1.2 to 5.1; p = 0.0132). In this population, high fibrinogen levels associated with high Lp(a) levels significantly increased the risk of CHD.
PubMed ID
11897206 View in PubMed
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Association of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia with smaller HDL particle size.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170170
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2007 Feb;190(2):429-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Jean-Charles Hogue
Benoît Lamarche
Daniel Gaudet
André J Tremblay
Jean-Pierre Després
Jean Bergeron
Claude Gagné
Patrick Couture
Author Affiliation
Lipid Research Center (S-102), CHUL Research Center, Laval University, Que, Canada.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2007 Feb;190(2):429-35
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Female
Heterozygote Detection
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - blood - drug therapy - genetics
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Receptors, LDL - blood
Reference Values
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Small, dense HDL particles have been associated with factors known to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, such as obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, small dense LDL particles, decreased HDL-cholesterol levels and increased apoA-I fractional catabolic rate from plasma. In order to assess the potential contribution of HDL particle size to atherosclerosis in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), we examined the electrophoretic characteristics of HDL particles in a large cohort of well defined FH heterozygotes and controls. A total of 259 FH heterozygotes and 208 controls participated in the study. FH subjects were carriers of one of the nine French Canadian mutations in the LDL receptor gene. All subjects were apoE3 homozygotes. HDL particles were characterized by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis following a 6-week lipid-lowering drug-free baseline period. The integrated HDL size was significantly smaller in the FH group compared to controls (FH=87.3+/-5.2 Angstroms versus controls=91.6+/-4.9 Angstroms, P
PubMed ID
16546193 View in PubMed
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Characterization of a novel mutation causing hepatic lipase deficiency among French Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185140
Source
J Lipid Res. 2003 Aug;44(8):1508-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Isabelle L Ruel
Patrick Couture
Claude Gagne
Yves Deshaies
Jacques Simard
Robert A Hegele
Benoît Lamarche
Author Affiliation
Institute on Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, CHUL Research Center, Laval University, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Lipid Res. 2003 Aug;44(8):1508-14
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - pathology
Adult
Aged
Female
France - ethnology
Genotype
Humans
Hypertriglyceridemia - enzymology - genetics
Lipase - deficiency - genetics
Liver - enzymology
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Obesity - enzymology - genetics - pathology
Pedigree
Quebec
Abstract
Individuals with hepatic lipase (HL) deficiency are often characterized by elevated levels of triglycerides (TGs) and cholesterol. The aim of the present study was to characterize the molecular defect leading to severe HL deficiency in a Québec-based kindred. In the proband and two of her brothers, the very low to undetectable HL activity resulted from compound heterozygosity for two rare HL gene mutations, a previously unknown missense mutation in exon 5 designated A174T and the previously reported T383M mutation in exon 8 of the HL gene. The mutation at codon 174 resulted in the substitution of alanine for threonine, a polar amino acid, in a highly conserved nonpolar region of the protein involved in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. The severe HL deficiency among the three related compound heterozygotes was associated with a marked TG enrichment of LDL and HDL particles. The two men with severe HL deficiency also presented with abdominal obesity, which appeared to amplify the impact of HL deficiency on plasma TG-rich lipoprotein levels. Our results demonstrated that HL deficiency in this Québec kindred is associated with an abnormal lipoprotein-lipid profile, which may vary considerably in the presence of secondary factors such as abdominal obesity.
PubMed ID
12777476 View in PubMed
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Comparison of prognosis for men with type 2 diabetes mellitus and men with cardiovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153328
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Jan 6;180(1):40-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-6-2009
Author
Gilles R Dagenais
Annie St-Pierre
Patrick Gilbert
Benoît Lamarche
Jean-Pierre Després
Paul-Marie Bernard
Peter Bogaty
Author Affiliation
Institut universitaire de cardiologie et pneumologie, Montréal, Que. gilles.dagenais@crhl.ulaval.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Jan 6;180(1):40-7
Date
Jan-6-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - mortality
Diabetic Angiopathies - mortality
Electrocardiography
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Prognosis
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
People with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. In some studies, the mortality rate among people with this condition has been equivalent to that among people with cardiovascular disease. We compared cardiovascular mortality between incident cases of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
The study population was part of a random sample of 4376 men from Quebec, Canada, aged 35 to 64 years, who did not have cardiovascular disease in 1974 and who were followed until 1998. Three groups of incident cases were identified: diabetes without cardiovascular disease, first cardiovascular event (myocardial infarction, unstable angina or stroke) without diabetes, and both cardiovascular disease and diabetes. These cases were age-matched to a control group without diabetes or cardiovascular disease.
During the 24-year follow-up period, new diabetes without cardiovascular disease was documented in 137 men. A first cardiovascular event without diabetes was documented in 527 men. Relative to the 627 controls, men with 1 of the 2 diseases of interest had higher cardiovascular mortality (age-adjusted relative risk [RR] 3.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.96-4.92) for those with diabetes and 4.46 (95% CI 3.15-6.30) for those with cardiovascular disease). However, within the first 5 years after diagnosis, men with cardiovascular disease had higher cardiovascular mortality than men with diabetes (age-adjusted RR 2.03, 95% CI 1.01-4.08).
Men with isolated type 2 diabetes and men with isolated cardiovascular disease had similar cardiovascular mortality rates several years after initial diagnosis of either condition. These findings reinforce the need to prevent and optimally manage diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19124789 View in PubMed
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Concordance/discordance between plasma apolipoprotein B levels and the cholesterol indexes of atherosclerotic risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185411
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2003 May 15;91(10):1173-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2003
Author
Allan D Sniderman
Annie C St-Pierre
Bernard Cantin
Gilles R Dagenais
Jean-Pierre Després
Benoît Lamarche
Author Affiliation
Mike Rosenbloom Laboratory for Cardiovascular Research, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2003 May 15;91(10):1173-7
Date
May-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Apolipoproteins B - blood - diagnostic use
Arteriosclerosis - blood
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood - diagnostic use
Cholesterol, HDL - blood - diagnostic use
Cholesterol, LDL - blood - diagnostic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Quebec
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to examine concordance/discordance among 4 atherogenic indexes of cardiovascular risk: plasma total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB). Analyses were conducted in a cohort of 2,103 men without coronary artery disease (CAD) at the onset of the Quebec Cardiovascular Study. Although there were strong and highly significant correlations among the 4 risk indexes (0.78 1/3 of all subjects had discordant levels. Kappa analysis confirmed that there was only fair agreement between apoB and total or LDL cholesterol (0.38 and 0.36, respectively) and only moderate agreement between non-HDL cholesterol and apoB (0.47). Finally, a significant proportion of subjects (528 of 2,103) who had disproportionately higher apoB levels than would have been predicted based on their LDL cholesterol concentrations was more obese and manifested several features of the metabolic syndrome. They also had a significantly increased cardiovascular risk. In summary, plasma apoB and the various cholesterol indexes are complementary rather than competitive indexes of atherosclerotic risk and provide further evidence as to why measurement of apoB should be part of a standard lipoprotein assessment of CAD risk.
PubMed ID
12745098 View in PubMed
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Dairy product intake and its association with body weight and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a population in dietary transition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133189
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2011 Apr;30(2):92-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Annie Ferland
Benoît Lamarche
Marie-Ludivine Château-Degat
Emilie Counil
Elhadji Anassour-Laouan-Sidi
Belkacem Abdous
Éric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Axe Santé des populations & Environnementale, Centre de recherche du CHUL, Université Laval, Québec, Canada. annie.ferland@me.com
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2011 Apr;30(2):92-9
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body Weight
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Dairy Products
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Diet - ethnology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Waist-Hip Ratio
Young Adult
Abstract
Higher dairy product intake has shown beneficial effects on body weight, blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Caucasian populations. This study evaluated dairy product intake and its association with body weight and CVD risk profile among a population undergoing a dietary transition in Canada, the Nunavik Inuit.
Data were collected from August 27 to October 1, 2004, in the 14 villages of Nunavik on a Canadian research icebreaker (Canadian Coast Guard ship Amundsen). Dairy product intake and calcium intake were evaluated in 543 Inuit using a food frequency questionnaire. Physiological (lipid profile, fasting glucose, and insulin) and anthropometrical measurements were also obtained.
The range of median dairy product intake extended from 120 g/d in the lowest tertile to 290 g/d in the highest tertile. The median of calcium intake was 524 mg/d. Participants in the highest tertile of dairy product consumption had higher body weight, fat-free mass, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and fasting glucose concentrations than participants in the lowest tertile (all p
PubMed ID
21730217 View in PubMed
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Detection of a major gene effect for LDL peak particle diameter and association with apolipoprotein H gene haplotype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172896
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2005 Oct;182(2):231-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Yohan Bossé
Mary F Feitosa
Jean-Pierre Després
Benoît Lamarche
Treva Rice
D C Rao
Claude Bouchard
Louis Pérusse
Marie-Claude Vohl
Author Affiliation
Lipid Research Center, CHUL Research Center, TR-93, 2705 Laurier Blvd Sainte-Foy, Que., Canada G1V 4G2.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2005 Oct;182(2):231-9
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chromosome Segregation
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17
Coronary Disease - genetics
Female
Genetic Variation
Glycoproteins - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Lipoproteins, LDL - chemistry - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Particle Size
Quantitative Trait Loci
Quebec
beta 2-Glycoprotein I
Abstract
Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) size, a coronary heart disease risk factor, is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Results from the Quebec Family Study (QFS) revealed that the LDL peak particle diameter (LDL-PPD) aggregates in families with a heritability coefficient above 50% and is affected by a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 17q (LOD=6.8). Complex segregation analyses have consistently demonstrated a major gene effect influencing LDL size. In the present study, we report a similar analysis in the QFS cohort, which suggests that a major gene explains 23% of the variance in age-body mass index and triglyceride-adjusted LDL-PPD. The most intuitive positional candidate gene on chromosome 17q is the apolipoprotein H gene. Direct sequencing of the promoter, coding regions, and exon-intron splicing boundaries of this gene revealed the presence of three missense mutations and two polymorphisms in the untranslated regions. Using family-based association tests, none of these variants was individually associated with LDL-PPD. However, analysis of the haplotypes constructed from the three missense mutations, suggested that one particular haplotype (frequency=20.9%) was associated with a significant increase in LDL-PPD trait values (p=0.046). Taken together, these results suggest the presence of a major gene effect influencing LDL-PPD and a positive association with a positional candidate gene located on chromosome 17q. Replication of the association between apolipoprotein H gene haplotype and LDL-PPD is required before reaching firm conclusion.
PubMed ID
16159595 View in PubMed
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Effect of a nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern on plasma lipids, lipoproteins and body weight in healthy French-Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183793
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2003 Sep;170(1):115-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Julie Goulet
Benoít Lamarche
Geneviève Nadeau
Simone Lemieux
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods Institute, Laval University, Québec, Québec, Canada G1K 7P4.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2003 Sep;170(1):115-24
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Apolipoproteins B - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Diet, Mediterranean
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Middle Aged
Nutrition Therapy
Nutritional Status
Reference Values
Time Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Women's health
Abstract
The present study examined the effect of a nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern in uncontrolled 'real life' conditions among a group of 77 French-Canadian women. The principal objective was to document changes in the plasma lipid-lipoprotein profile and in body weight that occurred in response to the intervention. The 12-week nutritional intervention included two group sessions, three individual sessions and four 24-h recalls (phone interview) with a registered dietitian. A score based on the 11 components of the Mediterranean pyramid, ranging from 0 to 44 points, was established to evaluate the adhesion to the Mediterranean food pattern. The Mediterranean score increased from 21.1+/-3.6 at baseline to 28.6+/-4.4 after 6 weeks of intervention (P
PubMed ID
12957689 View in PubMed
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Effect of Mediterranean diet with and without weight loss on apolipoprotein B100 metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106012
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2014 Feb;34(2):433-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Caroline Richard
Patrick Couture
Esther M M Ooi
André J Tremblay
Sophie Desroches
Amélie Charest
Alice H Lichtenstein
Benoît Lamarche
Author Affiliation
From the Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada (C.R., P.C., A.J.T., S.D., A.C., B.L.); Metabolic Research Centre, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia (E.M.M.O.); and Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory, Tufts University, Boston, MA (A.H.L.).
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2014 Feb;34(2):433-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apolipoprotein B-100 - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Diet, Mediterranean
Energy intake
Humans
Kinetics
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - diagnosis - diet therapy
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Particle Size
Quebec
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the effect of a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) with and without weight loss (WL) on apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome.
The diet of 19 men with metabolic syndrome (age, 24-62 years) was first standardized to a North American isoenergetic control diet for 5 weeks, followed by an isoenergetic MedDiet for an additional 5 weeks under full-feeding conditions (MedDiet-WL). Participants next underwent a 20-week supervised WL program under free-living conditions (-10.2 ± 2.9% body weight; P
PubMed ID
24265415 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.