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The activities and responsibilities of the vice chair for education in U.S. and Canadian departments of medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123194
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):1041-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Erica Brownfield
Benjamin Clyburn
Sally Santen
Gustavo Heudebert
Paul A Hemmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. ebrownf@emory.edu
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):1041-5
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - organization & administration
Canada
Education, Medical
Faculty, Medical
Female
Humans
Job Description
Leadership
Male
Organizational Objectives
Physician Executives
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
A profile of the activities and responsibilities of vice chairs for education is notably absent from the medical education literature. The authors sought to determine the demographics, roles and responsibilities, and major priorities and challenges faced by vice chairs for education.
In 2010, the authors sent a confidential, Web-based survey to all 82 identified department of medicine vice chairs for education in the United States and Canada. The authors inquired about demographics, roles, expectations of and for their position, opinions on the responsibilities outlined for their position, metrics used to evaluate their success, top priorities, and job descriptions. Analysis included creating descriptive statistics and categorizing the qualitative comments.
Fifty-nine vice chairs for education (72%) responded. At the time of appointment, only 6 (10%) were given a job description, and only 17 (28%) had a defined job description and metrics used to evaluate their success. Only 20 (33%) had any formal budget management training, and 23 (38%) controlled an education budget. Five themes emerged regarding the responsibilities and goals of the vice chair for education: oversee educational programs; possess educational expertise; promote educational scholarship; serve in leadership activities; and, disturbingly, respondents found expectations to be vague and ill defined.
Vice chairs for education are departmental leaders. The authors' findings and recommendations can serve as a beginning for defining educational directions and resources, building consensus, and designing an appropriate educational infrastructure for departments of medicine.
Notes
Comment In: Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):999-100122827983
PubMed ID
22722351 View in PubMed
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