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A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257843
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Petra Svedberg
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Henrika Jormfeldt
Author Affiliation
Petra Svedberg, Associate Professor, School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Prospective Studies
Psychotherapy - methods
Quality of Life
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUNDS. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR).
The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment.
The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments.
The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals.
Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients' health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning.
PubMed ID
24228778 View in PubMed
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The attitudes of patients and staff towards aspects of health promotion interventions in mental health services in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150313
Source
Health Promot Int. 2009 Sep;24(3):269-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Petra Svedberg
Lars Hansson
Bengt Svensson
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. petra.svedberg@lthalland.se
Source
Health Promot Int. 2009 Sep;24(3):269-76
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Medical Staff - psychology
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Patients - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The present study investigates attitudes towards aspects of health promotion in mental health services, as rated by patients and staff. The aim of the study was to investigate similarities and differences in attitudes towards health promotion interventions among patients and staff in mental health services, using a newly developed questionnaire, the Health Promotion Intervention Questionnaire (HPIQ). The study has a cross-sectional design and a sample of 141 patients and 140 staff were recruited to the study. The response rate was 59% for the patients and 50% for the staff. The participants were asked to rate the attitudes of the 19 items included in the HPIQ. The result showed that patients and staff in some cases share similar attitudes regarding aspects of health promotion intervention. According to both groups, empowerment is the most important intervention in health promotion. Significant differences between the ratings of patients and staff appeared regarding all subscales of HPIQ. Patients rated alliance and educational support significantly higher than staff and staff-rated empowerment and practical support significantly higher than patients. Based on these findings, it is of importance to meet patients' desire for information and knowledge in an interactive manner with an empowerment approach to promote health in mental health services.
PubMed ID
19525504 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards mental illness among health care students at Swedish universities--a follow-up study after completed clinical placement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152070
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2009 Aug;29(6):660-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Urban Markström
Amanda Lundvik Gyllensten
Ulrika Bejerholm
Tommy Björkman
David Brunt
Lars Hansson
Christel Leufstadius
Mikael Sandlund
Bengt Svensson
Margareta Ostman
Mona Eklund
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. urban.markstrom@socw.umu.se
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2009 Aug;29(6):660-5
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Attitude of Health Personnel
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Preceptorship - statistics & numerical data
Prejudice
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Students, Health Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the changes in attitudes towards mental illness after theoretical education and clinical placement among students from university programmes preparing for different kinds of health professions. Three different questionnaires were used, measuring the level of familiarity with mental illness and attitudes towards mental illness in general and towards specific mental illnesses. The data were collected on two occasions, before the theoretical course and after the completed clinical placement. The result showed that the attitudes toward mental illness in general had changed in a less stigmatising direction after the clinical placement. On the other hand, attitudes toward specific mental illnesses did not show any major changes. A conclusion is that the clinical placement included in the university programmes to some extent could affect attitudes in a de-stigmatizing direction, possibly because of the interaction with persons suffering from mental illness and experienced supervisors.
PubMed ID
19286287 View in PubMed
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Clients' experiences of the Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256774
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22916
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Henrika Jormfeldt
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Petra Svedberg
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden; henrika.jormfeldt@hh.se.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22916
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Goals
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health services
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Self Concept
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Trust
Young Adult
Abstract
The Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach (BPR) is person-centered and characterized by being based entirely on the individual's unique needs and preferences in the areas of working, learning, social contacts, and living environment. Nevertheless, the person-centered approach is lacking firm evidence regarding outcomes, and empirical studies regarding clients' experiences of this particular model are needed. A qualitative content analysis of 10 transcribed semistructured individual interviews was used to describe and explore clients' experiences of the BPR during an implementation project in Sweden. The findings from the interviews could be summarized in "A sense of being in communion with self and others" theme, consisting of three categories: increased self-understanding, getting new perspectives, and being in a trusting relationship. The results showed that clients do not always recognize nor are able to verbalize their goals before they have been given the possibility to reflect their thoughts in collaboration with a trusted person. The guidelines of the approach are intended to support the clients' ability to participate in decision making regarding their own care. More research about efficacy of different rehabilitation approaches and exploration of fidelity to guidelines of rehabilitation programs are required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24717265 View in PubMed
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Differences in self-reported importance of elements of health and subjectively experienced health among outpatients in community mental health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130679
Source
Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2011 Oct;25(5):e19-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Henrika Jormfeldt
Lars Hansson
Bengt Svensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Henrika.Jormfeldt@hh.se
Source
Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2011 Oct;25(5):e19-26
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Community Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Self-Assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Positive dimensions of mental health are strong protective factors against physical and mental illness in general population. A cross-sectional study including a randomly selected sample of 141 outpatients was performed to explore differences in patients' self-reported importance of elements of health and subjective experiences of health related to sociodemographic background variables. The examination of differences in self-reported importance of elements of health showed differences regarding gender, and the analyses of subjectively experienced health showed differences regarding age and diagnosis. Clinical interventions aiming at strengthening positive dimensions of health are required in community mental health services to meet the patients' individual needs of enhanced health.
PubMed ID
21978810 View in PubMed
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Experiences of a Mental Health First Aid training program in Sweden: a descriptive qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270268
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2015 May;51(4):497-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Sigrid Stjernswärd
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2015 May;51(4):497-503
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
First Aid
Focus Groups
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Professional Role
Qualitative Research
Social Stigma
Sweden
Abstract
Restricted mental health literacy and stigma are barriers to treatment of mental disorders. A Mental Health First Aid training program was tested for implementation in Sweden among employees in the public sector. The aim of the present qualitative study was to explore participants' experiences of the program in more depth, in conjunction with a randomized controlled study. Twenty four persons participated in a total of six focus groups 6-8 months after program participation. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The analysis resulted in five categories illustrating the participants' experiences of the course: increased awareness, knowledge and understanding; influence on attitude and approach; tool box and confidence; feedback on content and layout; and tangible examples of applied knowledge. The most central finding is the fruitfulness of the program's practical focus and use, the increased confidence and inclination to act following program participation, and the importance of experienced instructors.
PubMed ID
25663123 View in PubMed
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'How do we know if this is the best?' Mental health-care professionals' views on national guidelines for psychosocial interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265092
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2014 Jun;23(3):221-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Boel Sandström
Ania Willman
Bengt Svensson
Gunilla Borglin
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2014 Jun;23(3):221-31
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods - standards
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Policy Making
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Psychiatric Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Schizophrenia - therapy
Sweden
Abstract
National guidelines are released regularly, and professionals are expected to adopt and implement them. However, studies dealing with mental health-care professionals' views about guidelines are sparse. The aim of the present study was to highlight mental health-care staff's views on the Swedish national guidelines for 'psychosocial interventions for schizophrenia or schizophrenia-type symptoms' and their implementation. The study took place in the southeast parts of Sweden, and data were collected through five group interviews consisting of 16 professionals working either in the county council or in the municipalities. The transcribed text was analysed by content analysis, revealing two categories. The first category 'a challenge to the practice of care as known' reflected that the release of guidelines could be perceived as a challenge to prevailing care and culture. The second category 'anticipating change to come from above' mirrored views on how staff expected the implementation process to flow from top to bottom. To facilitate working in accordance with guidelines, we suggest that future guidelines should be accompanied by an implementation plan, where the educational needs of frontline staff are taken into account. There is also a need for policy makers and managers to assume responsibility in supporting the implementation of evidence-based practice.
PubMed ID
24779989 View in PubMed
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How mental health literacy and experience of mental illness relate to stigmatizing attitudes and social distance towards people with depression or psychosis: A cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278457
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016;70(4):309-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016;70(4):309-13
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - psychology
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Female
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - psychology
Self Report
Social Distance
Social Stigma
Stereotyping
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Background Evidence suggests that mental health literacy among the public is low, and stigmatizing attitudes are widespread. So far the effects of anti-stigma campaigns are small, and studies demonstrate that negative attitudes have been quite stable through recent decades. Aims To investigate the relationships between mental health literacy, experience of mental illness and stigmatizing attitudes/social distance towards people with depression or psychosis. Methods A cross-sectional study in which staff members from public services in Sweden (n?=?1027) completed questionnaires covering demographic data, self-reported experience of mental illness, identification of a vignette for depression or psychosis, beliefs about helpful interventions for the illness presented in the vignette, and attitudes and social distance towards people with the illness. Results About 50% of participants could identify depression and less than 40% psychosis. A higher degree of mental health literacy was related to less stigma and social distance but mainly towards people with depression. A similar relationship was shown for having personal or family experience of mental illness and attitudes/social distance. Negative attitudes and social distance were significantly higher in all aspects measured towards a person with psychosis than a person with depression. Conclusions A higher degree of mental health literacy relates to more positive attitudes and less desire for social distance towards people with depression. The differences between depression and psychosis should be taken into account in anti-stigma interventions.
PubMed ID
26643359 View in PubMed
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Individual placement and support - a model to get employed for people with mental illness - the first Swedish report of outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137018
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2011 Sep;25(3):591-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Ulla Nygren
Urban Markström
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Mikael Sandlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Division of Occupational Therapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. ulla.nygren@occupther.umu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2011 Sep;25(3):591-8
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Employment
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - physiopathology
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Sweden
Abstract
Lack of participation in the open labour market is highly prevalent for people with a mental illness across countries, and the proportion of people who get some kind of sickness benefit because of mental illness is steadily growing in Europe. Vocational rehabilitation through individual placement and support (IPS) has been shown to be effective and is evidence-based for people with severe mental illness. In Sweden, the method is used but not scientifically evaluated. The aim was to investigate vocational and nonvocational outcomes at a 1-year follow-up and the relationships between these outcomes, at two different sites in the north of Sweden. The participants were 65 men and women, mostly younger than 30 years of age and with a mental illness. Occupational situation, psychiatric symptoms, self-esteem, quality of life and psychosocial functioning were assessed. The vocational outcome during 1 year was that 25% of the participants were employed, and 14% were in education. Most of the participants moved from unemployment to work practice for a prolonged time. Participants in employment, education or work practice at follow-up showed higher satisfaction with their occupational situation than those without regular activities outside home. Among the participants in work practice, improvements in psychiatric symptoms and global functioning were identified. This attempt is the first to evaluate supported employment according to the IPS model for persons with mental illness applied in the Swedish welfare system. There is a need for a longer follow-up period to evaluate whether interventions such as further education and work practice actually will lead to real work.
PubMed ID
21323690 View in PubMed
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Mapping attitudes and awareness with regard to national guidelines: an e-mail survey among decision makers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273426
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2014 Oct;22(7):884-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Boel Sandström
Ania Willman
Bengt Svensson
Gunilla Borglin
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2014 Oct;22(7):884-93
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Decision Making
Evidence-Based Practice
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Politics
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The adoption of evidence-based guidelines within the mental health field has been slow. Changing inadequate practice is therefore a formidable challenge for mental health-care managers.
To explore decision-makers' attitudes and awareness regarding the national guidelines for psychosocial interventions targeting people with schizophrenia.
A questionnaire distributed by e-mail to 592 Swedish decision-makers was analysed using descriptive and comparative techniques.
Significantly more of the top-level mental health-care managers than politicians stated that they knew about the national guidelines (i.e. their release and content) and they considered the guidelines to be a good source of support for planning and allocating resources.
If those responsible for allocating resources (i.e. politicians) are unaware of the dissemination of national guidelines or their content, and they do not perceive the national guidelines to be a good source of support for planning and allocating resources, this is likely to have a negative influence on the remit of nurse managers as well as nursing practice.
Top-level mental health-care managers have a vital role to play in the implementation of national guidelines. However, our findings indicate that implementing national guidelines in practice could be virtually impossible without strategic government support.
PubMed ID
23869416 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.