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Catheter-directed foam sclerotherapy treatment of saphenous vein incompetence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126292
Source
Vasa. 2012 Mar;41(2):120-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Giuseppe Asciutto
Bengt Lindblad
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden and Vascular Center Malmö-Lund, University Hospital MAS, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Vasa. 2012 Mar;41(2):120-4
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Catheterization, Peripheral - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Saphenous Vein - ultrasonography
Sclerosing Solutions - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Sclerotherapy - adverse effects - methods
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex
Venous Insufficiency - therapy - ultrasonography
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study is to report the short-term results of catheter-directed foam sclerotherapy (CDFS) in the treatment of axial saphenous vein incompetence.
Data of all patients undergoing CDFS for symptomatic primary incompetence of the great or small saphenous vein were prospectively collected. Treatment results in terms of occlusion rate and patients' grade of satisfaction were analysed. All successfully treated patients underwent clinical and duplex follow-up examinations one year postoperatively.
Between September 2006 and September 2010, 357 limbs (337 patients) were treated with CDFS at our institution. Based on the CEAP classification, 64 were allocated to clinical class C3 , 128 to class C4, 102 to class C5 and 63 to class C6. Of the 188 patients who completed the one year follow up examination, 67 % had a complete and 14 % a near complete obliteration of the treated vessel. An ulcer-healing rate of 54 % was detected. 92 % of the patients were satisfied with the results of treatment. We registered six cases of thrombophlebitis and two cases of venous thromboembolism, all requiring treatment.
The short-term results of CDFS in patients with axial vein incompetence are acceptable in terms of occlusion and complications rates.
PubMed ID
22403130 View in PubMed
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External quality assessment of HbA1c and its effect on comparison between Swedish pediatric diabetes clinics. Experiences from the Swedish pediatric diabetes quality register (Swediabkids) and Equalis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113001
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2013 Oct;51(10):2045-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Bengt Lindblad
Gunnar Nordin
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2013 Oct;51(10):2045-52
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bias (epidemiology)
Blood Glucose - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromatography - methods - standards
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Immunoassay - standards
Infant
Insulin - blood
Male
Quality Control
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Abstract
To explore to what extent measurement error can explain the variation of mean patient HbA(1c) between clinics.
For each year 2005-2010 data from 5380-6985 children, age
PubMed ID
23773967 View in PubMed
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Activated protein C-protein C inhibitor complex in peripheral arterial disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97246
Source
Ann Vasc Surg. 2010 Jul;24(5):588-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
David Blomstrand
Tilo Kölbel
Bengt Lindblad
Anders Gottsäter
Author Affiliation
Vascular Centre, Malmö University Hospital, University of Lund, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Ann Vasc Surg. 2010 Jul;24(5):588-95
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Thrombin activation measured by the levels of the complex between activated protein C (APC) and the protein C inhibitor (PCI) is elevated in several atherosclerotic disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether levels of the APC-PCI complex are related to the prognosis in peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Longitudinal study performed at the Vascular Centre, Malm? University Hospital, Sweden. METHODS: APC-PCI complex levels were analyzed in 268 consecutive patients hospitalized for PAD and in 42 healthy controls (median age, 74 years). Patients (n = 35) with warfarin treatment less than 4 weeks before APC-PCI sampling were excluded from analysis. Data-based medical records of all 233 remaining patients (median age, 72 [64-79] years) were searched for vascular events such as hospitalization because of atherosclerotic disease, operative or endovascular recanalization of peripheral arteries, transtibial or transfemoral amputation because of PAD, acute coronary syndrome, stroke, or death. RESULTS: Median duration of follow-up was 16 months (interquartile range, 12-23 months). APC-PCI complex levels were higher in PAD patients than in controls (0.240 [0.180-0.320] microg/L vs. 0.140 [0.190-0.220] microg/L; p
PubMed ID
20409682 View in PubMed
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Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in the population-based Malmö thrombophilia study (MATS). Epidemiology, risk factors, recurrence risk, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144086
Source
Thromb Res. 2010 Jun;125(6):e335-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Nazim Isma
Peter J Svensson
Anders Gottsäter
Bengt Lindblad
Author Affiliation
University of Lund Centre for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Malmö University Hospital, S - 20502 Malmö, Sweden. nazim.isma@med.lu.se
Source
Thromb Res. 2010 Jun;125(6):e335-8
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Factor V
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thromboembolism
Thrombophilia
Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is much less common in the upper than in the lower extremity. Furthermore, there is limited information on risk factors for and the prognosis of upper extremity (UE)DVT in the general population.
To estimate incidence, risk factors, and prognosis in UEDVT.
Among a total of 1203 patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) diagnosed during 1998-2006 in the prospective population-based Malmö thrombophilia study, 63 (5%, 33 men [52%, age 54+/-17years], and 30 women [48%, age 55+/-22years]) had UEDVT and were evaluated concerning risk factors, treatment, recurrent VTE, and mortality.
At diagnosis, 19(30%) patients had known malignancy and 6(10%) had VTE heredity. Among female UEDVT patients 4(13%) used hormone therapy, 1(3%) was pregnant, while none was in the postpartum period. Of all 63 UEDVT patients, 12(19%) were heterozygous, and 3(5%) homozygous for the Factor V Leiden (FVL)-mutation. Two (3%) patients were heterozygous for the prothrombin mutation, and 1 patient (1.6%) showed both heterozygous FVL-mutation and lupus anticoagulant antibodies. Phlebography had been used for diagnosis in 48(76%), ultrasonography in 16(25%), and computer tomography (CT) in 9(14%) patients. Twenty-two patients (35%) were treated in hospital, and the remaining 41(65%) as out-patients. Sixty-two (98%) was treated with low molecular weight heparin (LMH), 60(95%) with oral anticoagulants (OAC), 3(5%) with unfractionated heparin, and 3(5%) with thrombolysis. VTE recurrence rate during median 62 (range 31-117) month of follow-up was 8/63(13%). Fifteen (24%) UEDVT patients died during follow-up; 9(47%) of the 19 patients with known malignancy at diagnosis and 6(14%) of the other patients. Yearly incidence of UEDVT was 3.6/100.000 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.3 - 4.03).
Malignancies and the FVL mutation were common among patients with UEDVT. Mortality during follow-up vas high.
PubMed ID
20406709 View in PubMed
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Markers of proteolysis, fibrinolysis, and coagulation in relation to size and growth rate of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97505
Source
Vasc Endovascular Surg. 2010 May;44(4):262-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Despina Flondell-Sité
Bengt Lindblad
Tilo Kölbel
Anders Gottsäter
Author Affiliation
University of Lund, Vascular Centre, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. despina.site@gmail.com
Source
Vasc Endovascular Surg. 2010 May;44(4):262-8
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - blood - enzymology - pathology
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Coagulation
Case-Control Studies
Disease Progression
Female
Fibrinolysis
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 - blood
Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 - blood
Middle Aged
Peptide Hydrolases - blood
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 - blood
Prospective Studies
Protein C - metabolism
Protein C Inhibitor - blood
Sweden
Time Factors
Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 - blood
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - blood
Abstract
We evaluated whether matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9, their inhibitors, markers for fibrinolysis, and thrombin activation are associated with diameter and growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Material and Methods: Matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMP-1), serpine-1, tPa-serpine-1, and activated protein C- protein C inhibitor (APC-PCI) complex were analyzed in 353 patients with AAA grouped according to AAA size, and 219 gender- and age-matched healthy individuals. Follow-up of AAA growth for up to 7 years was possible in 178 of 353 patients. Results: At baseline, all groups of patients with AAA showed lower levels of MMP-2 and -9, and higher levels of TIMP-1, serpine-1, and t-Pa-serpine-1 than controls. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 correlated inversely and APC-PCI complex correlated directly with AAA diameter. We found no correlations between markers for proteolysis, fibrinolysis, coagulation, and yearly AAA growth. CONCLUSION: Matrix metalloproteinase 2 is lower and APC-PCI higher in patients with larger AAA, but the relevance of the markers for AAA growth is far from clarified.
PubMed ID
20356864 View in PubMed
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Decreasing incidence of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm already before start of screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275547
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2016;16:44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Sofia Nessvi Otterhag
Anders Gottsäter
Bengt Lindblad
Stefan Acosta
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2016;16:44
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Aortic Rupture - epidemiology - prevention & control - surgery
Autopsy
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Incidence
Information Storage and Retrieval
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Population Growth
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate whether screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has led to a decrease in ruptured AAA (rAAA) incidence.
The Malmö population was evaluated regarding the incidence of rAAA and elective AAA surgery 4 years before and after start of AAA-screening in 2010. Data from 1971 to 1986 (J Vasc Surg 18:74-80, 1993) and 2000-2004 (J Vasc Surg 44:237-43, 2006), enabled analysis of trends over time.
Analysis of time-periods 1971-1986, 2000-2004, 2006-2010 and 2010-2014 showed an incidence of rAAA of 5.6 (4.9-6.3), 10.6 (8.9-12.4), 6.1 (4.6-7.6) and 4.0 (2.9-5.1), respectively. In men aged 60-69 years the incidences were 16.0 (10.7-21.3), 45.6 (27.7-63.4), 19.3 (9.2-35.3) and 8.9 (2.8-20.6), respectively. The incidences of elective AAA surgery in men aged 60-69 years were 22.9 (16.5-29.2), 34.6 (19.1-50.2), 9.7 (1.2-18.5) and 44.2 (27.0-61.6), respectively.
A decrease in incidence of rAAA in men was evident before the implementation of screening. We were yet not able to demonstrate a certain reduction in rAAA incidence after the start of screening.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26888090 View in PubMed
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[Peripheral arterial disease can be a question of social class. The ecological Malmo study shows big incidence differences between neighbourhoods].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161052
Source
Lakartidningen. 2007 Aug 29-Sep 4;104(35):2437-8
Publication Type
Article

The effect of low molecular weight heparin (dalteparin) on duration and initiation of labour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100668
Source
J Thromb Thrombolysis. 2010 Aug;30(2):149-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Nazim Isma
Peter J Svensson
Bengt Lindblad
Pelle G Lindqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Centre for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
J Thromb Thrombolysis. 2010 Aug;30(2):149-53
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anticoagulants - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Dalteparin - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Labor Onset - drug effects
Labor Stage, First - drug effects
Parity
Postpartum Hemorrhage - chemically induced
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic - blood - prevention & control
Premature Birth - chemically induced
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
It has recently been reported that women treated with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) during pregnancy had 3 h shorter duration of delivery. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether LMWH (dalteparin) affects labour. From January 1996 to December 2005, 217 consecutive pregnancies, out of 34 216 newborn (prevalence 0.6%) that were given thromboprophylaxis with dalteparin (usually 5,000 IU once daily). These 217 consecutive pregnancies were compared to an unselected control group (n = 1,499) of gravidae. Main outcome was time in first and second stage of labour and gestational age at delivery. Among nulliparous women, there were significantly fewer women with prolonged first stage of labour as compared to controls (4.1% vs. 8.5%, P = 0.047). In addition, the duration of first stage of labour was 1 h shorter among those treated with LMWH (5.2 vs. 6.2 h, P = 0.06). There were no such differences among parous women. The risk of prematurity, profuse blood loss, and postpartum anaemia was almost doubled among those treated with LMWH (11.5% vs. 5.9%, P = 0.002, 10.6% vs. 5.9%, P
PubMed ID
19949968 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and risk of pulmonary embolism in patients with intracardiac thrombosis: a population-based study of 23 796 consecutive autopsies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51907
Source
Eur Heart J. 2005 Jun;26(11):1108-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Mats Ogren
David Bergqvist
Henry Eriksson
Bengt Lindblad
Nils H Sternby
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. mats.ogren@astrazeneca.com
Source
Eur Heart J. 2005 Jun;26(11):1108-14
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Autopsy
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Heart Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Pulmonary Embolism - epidemiology - mortality
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Thrombosis - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
AIMS: While right intracardiac thrombosis (IT) is a potential cause of pulmonary embolism (PE) similar to that of stroke in left-sided IT, its prevalence and prognostic significance has not been studied in the general population. The aim of this study was to assess the age- and gender-specific prevalence of IT and its relation to PE in a population-based autopsy cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: Between 1970 and 1982, 23 796 autopsies, representing 84% of all in-hospital deaths in the Malmö city population, were performed, using a standardized procedure. The relationship between IT and PE was evaluated by cohort analyses and nested case-control studies. IT was present in 1706 (7.2%) patients, 727 and 747 of whom had right and left atrial IT, respectively. PE prevalence in patients with isolated left IT, isolated right IT, and combined IT was 28.5, 35.6, and 48.9%, with RR (95% CI) of 1.5 (1.3-1.8), 2.0 (1.6-2.5), and 3.5 (2.7-4.7), respectively, compared with age- and gender-matched controls. Patients dying from ischaemic heart disease had a 3.2 (2.7-3.6) times higher risk of right IT, which was associated with 43% PE prevalence. Of all patients with PE at autopsy, right IT was found in 354 (6.5%), and the only detected source of PE in 220 (4.0%). CONCLUSION: Right cardiac thrombosis, though difficult to assess clinically, is as common as left cardiac thrombosis and is associated with an increased risk of PE. The diagnosis should be considered in all cases of PE, especially in patients with atrial fibrillation or myocardial infarction and in the absence of confirmed deep vein thrombosis.
PubMed ID
15695529 View in PubMed
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Efficacy and durability of the chimney graft technique in urgent and complex thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263150
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2015 Apr;61(4):886-94.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Adel Bin Jabr
Bengt Lindblad
Nuno Dias
Timothy Resch
Martin Malina
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2015 Apr;61(4):886-94.e1
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aorta, Thoracic - surgery
Aortic Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Aortography - methods
Blood Vessel Prosthesis
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Endovascular Procedures - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - mortality - therapy
Prosthesis Design
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Stents
Sweden
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study reports the early and midterm to long-term experience of chimney grafts (CGs) in urgent endovascular repair of complex lesions in the thoracic aorta.
Twenty-nine high-risk patients (20 men) who were unfit for open repair were treated using CG technique for ruptured (n = 14) or symptomatic (n = 15) aortic lesions engaging the aortic arch itself (n = 9), the descending aorta (n = 10), or the thoracoabdominal aorta (n = 10). Twenty-two patients (76%) were treated urgently (=24 hours) and seven were semiurgent (=3 days). Of 41 chimneys used, 24 were placed in supra-aortic branches and 17 in visceral branches. Median follow-up (interquartile range) for the entire cohort was 2 years (0.6-3.8 years), 2.5 years (1-4 years) for 30-day survivors, and 3.5 years (1.9-6.4 years) for those who were still alive.
Four patients (14%) died =30 days of cerebral infarction (n = 1), visceral ischemia secondary to the initial rupture (n = 1), multiple organ failure (n = 1), or heart failure (n = 1). There were 11 late deaths (38%); however, only two deaths were related to the CG technique. The primary and secondary technical success rates were 86% (25 of 29) and 97% (28 of 29), respectively. The secondary patency rate of CGs was 98%. Seventeen (68%) of the aortic lesions shrank significantly. Three patients (10%) had primary type I endoleak and another three (10%) had secondary type I endoleak. The endoleaks were managed with Onyx (ev3 Endovascular, Inc, Plymouth, Minn) or coil embolization (n = 2), restenting (n = 1), and conversion to open repair (n = 2). One secondary endoleak is still under observation after >20 months. All primary endoleaks and one secondary endoleak originated from CGs in the brachiocephalic trunk (4 of 6 [67%]).
The midterm to long-term results of the CG technique for urgent and complex lesions of the thoracic aorta in high-risk patients are promising, with low early mortality and long durability of the CGs. More patients with longer follow-up are still needed.
PubMed ID
25616907 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.