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A 3-year follow-up of participation in peer support groups after a cardiac event.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53243
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Otto Torells Gata 16, Varberg 432 44, Sweden. Catherine.Hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - rehabilitation
Case-Control Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - rehabilitation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Peer Group
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Groups
Sweden
Abstract
Secondary prevention is an important component of a structured rehabilitation programme following a cardiac event. Comprehensive programmes have been developed in many European countries, the vast majority of which are hospital based. In Sweden, all patients with cardiac disease are also given the opportunity to participate in secondary prevention activities arranged by the National Association for Heart and Lung Patients [The Heart & Lung School (HL)]. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal study was to compare persons who attended the HL after a cardiac event and those who declined participation, with regard to health aspects, life situation, social network and support, clinical data, rehospitalisation and mortality. Totally 220 patients were included in the study. The patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire on four occasions, in addition to visiting a health care center for physical examination. After 3 years, 160 persons were still participating, 35 of whom attended the HL. The results show that persons who participated in the HL exercised more regularly, smoked less and had a denser network as well as more social support from nonfamily members than the comparison groups. This study contributes to increased knowledge among healthcare professionals, politicians and decision makers about peer support groups as a support strategy after a cardiac event.
PubMed ID
15572020 View in PubMed
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6-month CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - a case study from the couple's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165224
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Anders Broström
Peter Johansson
Jan Albers
Jan Wiberg
Eva Svanborg
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. andbr@imv.liu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - adverse effects - psychology
Cost of Illness
Fear
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frustration
Humans
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Obesity, Morbid - complications
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Snoring - etiology - psychology
Social Behavior
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is independently associated with an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can reduce mortality and morbidity, but low compliance rates are seen.
To explore and describe the experiences of CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe OSAS during a 6-month period from the couple's perspective. METHODS AND THE CASE: A single case study with a phenomenographic approach was employed. Diagnostic procedures of OSAS and initiation of treatment with Auto-CPAP, humidifier and a nasal mask were performed during 4 visits. Conceptions were collected at 4 different occasions during the 6-month period (before, and 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment initiation) by means of interviews with a 33-year old male patient and his female partner.
Totally 17 different structural aspects were found to fluctuate during the 6-month period in relation to; influence of stressors, social reactions and adaptation to increase compliance.
An increased knowledge about the influence of stressors, the social reactions, and the adaptation can help healthcare personnel to identify and better understand concerns of other patients and spouses during different time phases of the initial 6-month period of CPAP-treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):89-9018396463
PubMed ID
17291832 View in PubMed
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Access to the world after myocardial infarction: experiences of the recovery process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70416
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;31(2):63-8; discussion 69
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Evy Lidell
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Sweden. hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;31(2):63-8; discussion 69
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Attitude to Health
Family - psychology
Fear
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Change Events
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - rehabilitation
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Rehabilitation Nursing - organization & administration
Self Care - methods - psychology
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Myocardial infarction (MI) is a traumatic health event and at the same time a transition of vital importance in human life. The purpose of this study was to elucidate recovery patterns after myocardial infarction with regard to the content of patients' experiences. The study used a descriptive design and a qualitative method. Interviews with 16 men and women were performed, and data were subjected to a thematic content analysis. The recovery process had a pattern of ability, restraints, and reorientation. Through self-help and help from others, the mutual sharing of burdens, and clarifying restraints to recovery, the recovery process progressed toward reorientation. New values and motivation for change, as well as a new balance within the self and relationships were found. The MI had been integrated into life and, through the recovery process, patients' attitudes were better focused, leading to an enhanced quality of life.
PubMed ID
16526524 View in PubMed
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Being first on the scene of an accident--experiences of 'doing' prehospital emergency care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148703
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2010 Jun;24(2):266-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Carina Elmqvist
David Brunt
Bengt Fridlund
Margaretha Ekebergh
Author Affiliation
Centre for Acute & Critical Care, School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden. carina.elmqvist@vxu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2010 Jun;24(2):266-73
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Emergency medical services
Emergency Medical Technicians - psychology
Humans
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
Prehospital emergency care includes the care and treatment of patients prior to them reaching hospital. This is generally a field for the ambulance services, but in many cases firemen or police can be the ones to provide the first responses. The aim of this study was to describe and understand experiences of being the first responder on the scene of an accident, as described by policemen, firemen and ambulance staff. A lifeworld perspective was used in four different traumatic situations from southern Sweden. The data consisted of 13 unstructured interviews with first responders. The phenomenological analysis showed that experiences of being the first responder on the scene of an accident is expectations of doing a systematic course of action, dressed in the role of a hero, and at the same time being genuine in an interpersonal encounter. This entails a continuous movement between 'being' and 'doing'. It is not a question of either - or, instead everything is to be understood in relation to each other at the same time. Five constituents further described the variations of the phenomenon; a feeling of security in the uncertainty, a distanced closeness to the injured person, one moment in an eternity, cross-border cooperation within distinct borders and a need to make the implicit explicit. This finding highlights the importance of using policemen and firemen in doing life support measures while waiting for the ambulance staff, and would in turn increase the importance of the relationship between the different professionals on the scene of an accident.
PubMed ID
19732398 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer patients' satisfaction with a spontaneous system of check-up visits to a specialist nurse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18928
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2002 Sep;16(3):209-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Inga-Lill Koinberg
Lars Holmberg
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Oncology Clinic, Varberg Hospital, Varberg, Sweden. inga-lill.koinberg@Ithalland.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2002 Sep;16(3):209-15
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Specialties, Medical
Sweden
Abstract
AIM: To describe breast cancer patients' satisfaction with a spontaneous system of check-up visits to a specialist nurse. BACKGROUND: There is little evidence that routine follow-up visits after breast cancer surgery influence survival or patient satisfaction. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate alternative follow-up programmes. SAMPLE: A strategic sample of 19 breast cancer patients, who were not involved in a routine follow-up system but who had the possibility of contacting a specialist nurse when necessary, were interviewed. METHOD: A qualitative descriptive design inspired by the method of phenomenographic analysis was used. FINDINGS: Five description categories and 606 statements showing similarities and differences in conceptions were obtained. The patients satisfaction with the knowledgeable and professional skills of the nurses was high. Confirmation and trust were important and necessary in order for the women with breast cancer to feel secure. Patients had a need for information and self-care education. Accessibility and early assessment by professional personnel or an oncology nurse were essential in a system without routine follow-ups. DISCUSSION: This study identifies key issues in a specialist nurse-led check-up system. The findings can be used for developing an education programme for women who have undergone breast cancer surgery. Additionally, the findings emphasize the need to introduce more flexible solutions to the follow-up programmes, one alternative being specialist nurse-led check-ups.
PubMed ID
12191031 View in PubMed
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Cancer-related pain in palliative care: patients' perceptions of pain management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17943
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2004 Feb;45(4):410-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Barbro Boström
Marie Sandh
Dag Lundberg
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. barbro.bostrom@hos.hh.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2004 Feb;45(4):410-9
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Communication
Female
Hospitals
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Neoplasms - complications - psychology - therapy
Pain - psychology - therapy
Pain Measurement
Pain threshold
Palliative Care - methods
Patient satisfaction
Professional-Patient Relations
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Pain is still a significant problem for many patients with cancer, despite numerous, clear and concise guidelines for the treatment of cancer-related pain. The impact of pain cognition on patients' experiences of cancer-related pain remains relatively unexplored. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe how patients with cancer-related pain in palliative care perceive the management of their pain. METHOD: Thirty patients were strategically selected for interviews with open-ended questions, designed to explore the pain and pain management related to their cancer. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenographic approach. FINDINGS: Patients described 10 different perceptions of pain and pain management summarized in the three categories: communication, planning and trust. In terms of communication, patients expressed a need for an open and honest dialogue with health care professionals about all problems concerning pain. Patients expressed an urgent need for planning of their pain treatment including all caring activities around them. When they felt trust in the health care organization as a whole, and in nurses and physicians in particular, they described improved ability and willingness to participate in pain management. While the findings are limited to patients in palliative care, questions are raised about others with cancer-related pain without access to a palliative care team. CONCLUSION: The opportunity for patients to discuss pain and its treatment seems to have occurred late in the course of disease, mostly not until coming in contact with a palliative care team. They expressed a wish to be pain-free, or attain as much pain relief as possible, with as few side effects as possible.
PubMed ID
14756835 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular nursing in RN and higher education in Swedish universities: a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70929
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Sep;3(3):255-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Bengt Fridlund
Jan Mårtensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. bengt.fridlund@omv.lu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Sep;3(3):255-9
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology - education
Cardiovascular Diseases - nursing
Comparative Study
Curriculum - standards - statistics & numerical data
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Diploma Programs - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing
Humans
Needs Assessment
Nurse Clinicians - education
Nursing Education Research
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing
Specialties, Nursing - education
Sweden
Abstract
Cardiovascular nursing (CVN) is rapidly developing and has accumulated a large amount of evidence to support interventions aimed at reducing suffering and hastening recovery. However, knowledge of the extent and content of CVN training in Sweden is lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to identify and describe CVN in the Swedish RN education as well as in higher education, with reference to type of course and credits, content, area and target group. A nationwide survey was carried out in Sweden at all university level nursing schools (N=26) by means of a 25-item questionnaire, which was analysed by descriptive statistics. The findings show that 69% and 23% of the schools awarded 0-1 credits [0-1.5 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS)] and 2-3 credits (3-4.5 ECTS), respectively for cardiology/CVN in the RN education. Target areas outside the hospital setting reported by 23% and 19% of nursing schools were primary health care and community care, respectively. Special target groups in addition to the general public were the elderly (42%) and women (58%). Advanced courses in CVN comprising 10-40 credits (15-60 ECTS) were held by 27% of nursing schools, but no school had a specialist or Master level education. Important educational implications from the study of the RN education are the establishment of a minimum credit figure and to reach out into primary health care.
PubMed ID
15350236 View in PubMed
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Communication between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the initial visit to a continuous positive airway pressure clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280963
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Feb;26(3-4):568-577
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Anders Broström
Bengt Fridlund
Berith Hedberg
Per Nilsen
Martin Ulander
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Feb;26(3-4):568-577
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Patient satisfaction
Physician-Patient Relations
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - psychology - therapy
Sweden
Abstract
To describe facilitators and barriers from a patient perspective in communications between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the first meeting when continuous positive airway pressure is initiated.
Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment tends to be poor, especially at the initial phase of treatment. Communication between the patient and healthcare personnel has not been studied from the patient perspective, as either a barrier or facilitator for adherence.
A descriptive design using qualitative content analysis was used. Interviews with 25 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome took place after their initial visit at four continuous positive airway pressure clinics. A deductive analysis based on The 4 Habits Model (i.e. emphasise the importance of investing in the beginning of the consultation, elicit the patient's perspective, demonstrate empathy and invest in the end of the consultation) was conducted.
Building confidence (i.e. structure building, information transfer, commitment) or hindering confidence (i.e. organisational insufficiency, stress behaviour, interaction deficit) was associated with investing in the beginning. Motivating (i.e. situational insight, knowledge transfer, practical training) or demotivating (i.e. expectations, dominance and power asymmetry, barriers) was associated with eliciting the patient's perspective. Building hope (i.e. awareness, sensitivity, demonstration of understanding) or hindering hope (i.e. unprepared, uncommitted, incomprehension) was associated with showing empathy. Agreement (i.e. confirmation, responsibilities, comprehensive information) or disagreement (i.e. structural obscurity, irresponsibility, absent-mindedness) was associated with investing in the end.
Understanding of facilitators and barriers, as described by patients, can be used to improve contextual conditions and communication skills among healthcare personnel.
A patient-centred communication technique should be used in relation to all stages of The 4 Habits Model to facilitate shared decision-making and improve adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment.
PubMed ID
27685080 View in PubMed
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A comparison of adherence to correctly documented triage level of critically ill patients between emergency department and the ambulance service nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112454
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2013 Jul;21(3):204-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Kenneth Jönsson
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
University of Borås, School of Health Sciences, Borås, Sweden. kenneth.jonsson@hb.se
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2013 Jul;21(3):204-9
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Critical Illness
Emergency Medical Services - standards
Emergency Nursing - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards
Feedback
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Humans
Male
Patient Safety
Quality Control
Risk factors
Sweden
Triage - standards
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - nursing
Abstract
Priority or triage has always occurred in emergency care. Today it is performed by both nurses in emergency departments (EDs) and ambulance services (ASs) to ensure patient safety. Recent studies have shown that nurses are unlikely to change their first impressions and patients suffering from blunt trauma are undertriaged. Our study aimed to compare and evaluate the adherence to correct triage level documentation, between nurses in the ED and the AS, according to current regulations. Of 592 analysed triage records from a university, a central and a district hospital, the adherence was 64% by ED nurses and 43% by AS nurses (p
PubMed ID
23830372 View in PubMed
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Comparison of frequency, risk factors, and time course of postoperative delirium in octogenarians after transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262953
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2015 Mar 15;115(6):802-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2015
Author
Leslie S P Eide
Anette H Ranhoff
Bengt Fridlund
Rune Haaverstad
Karl Ove Hufthammer
Karel K J Kuiper
Jan Erik Nordrehaug
Tone M Norekvål
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2015 Mar 15;115(6):802-9
Date
Mar-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Stenosis - therapy
Cognition
Comorbidity
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Elective Surgical Procedures
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects
Hospitals, University
Humans
Incidence
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Postoperative delirium (PD) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) remains to be explored. We sought to (1) determine the incidence of PD in octogenarians who underwent TAVI or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), (2) identify its risk factors, and (3) describe possible differences in the onset and course of PD between treatment groups. A prospective cohort study of consecutive patients aged =80 years with severe aortic stenosis who underwent elective TAVI or SAVR (N = 143) was conducted. The incidence of PD was assessed for 5 days using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Risk factors for PD were studied with logistic regression. Patients treated with TAVI were older (p =0.001), had lower cognitive scores (p = 0.007), and more co-morbidities (p = 0.003). Despite this, significantly fewer (p = 0.013) patients treated with TAVI (44%) experienced PD compared to patients treated with SAVR (66%). Undergoing SAVR (p = 0.02) and having lower cognitive function (p = 0.03) emerged as risk factors for PD, whereas gender, activities of daily living, frailty, atrial fibrillation, and postoperative use of opioids and anxiolytics did not. Patients treated with TAVI and without PD during the first 2 postoperative days were unlikely to experience PD on subsequent days. The onset of PD after SAVR could occur at any time during the postoperative evaluation. In conclusion, SAVR in octogenarian patients with aortic stenosis might be considered as a predisposing factor for PD. Our data also suggest that the onset of PD was more unpredictable after SAVR.
PubMed ID
25644851 View in PubMed
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86 records – page 1 of 9.