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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's experience when interacting with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: a brief note.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157234
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2008 Jun;16(3):124-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Alistair Campbell
Barbara Hayes
Beryl Buckby
Author Affiliation
James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia. alistair.campbell@jcu.edu.au
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2008 Jun;16(3):124-31
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - ethnology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Women's health
Abstract
The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is one of the most widely used screening instruments for maternal perinatal anxiety and depression. It has maintained its robust performance when translated into multiple languages, when used prenatally and when used with perinatal fathers; thus the tool is also known as the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS). However, there have been no published psychometric data on versions of the EPDS adapted for screening Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. We describe the development of 'translations' of the EPDS and report their basic psychometric properties.
During the Queensland arm of the beyond blue National Postnatal Depression Program (2001-2005), partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women were forged. At TAIHS' stand alone "Mums and Babies" unit 181 women of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent were recruited into the study through their antenatal and postnatal visits and 25 were recruited at Mt Isa. Participants completed either the translation or the standard version of the EPDS both antenatally and postnatally.
The 'translations' of the EPDS demonstrated a high level of reliability. The was a strong correlation between the 'translations' and the EPDS. The 'translations' and the standard EPDS both identified high rates of women at risk of depression although the 'translations' identified higher rates.
We argue that the 'translation' may have been a more accurate predictor of perinatal women at risk for depression, but acknowledge that a lack of validity evidence weakens this conclusion.
PubMed ID
18471181 View in PubMed
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Building Indigenous Australian research capacity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104545
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2013 Dec;46(1):6-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Jacinta Kim Elston
Vicki Saunders
Barbara Hayes
Roxanne Bainbridge
Brian McCoy
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health, Medicine and Molecular Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia.
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2013 Dec;46(1):6-12
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Abstract
To build individual Indigenous research capacity and strengthen the capability of health research programmes to be culturally and ethically inclusive of Indigenous Australians in public health research.
In order to facilitate optimal participation and in recognition of the differing levels of research experience and knowledge held within this community of practice, an inclusive and culturally appropriate mixed methods approach with influences from action research and Indigenous research principles was undertaken.
Over the duration of the project, participants improved their research outcomes as measured by a range of factors including publications, completion of degrees and retention of project members.
Provision of an Indigenous led, culturally appropriate system of infrastructure and support centred on capacity building is effective in strengthen the inclusion of Indigenous Australians in research.
PubMed ID
24716756 View in PubMed
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Yarning/Aboriginal storytelling: towards an understanding of an Indigenous perspective and its implications for research practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104544
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2013 Dec;46(1):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Lynore K Geia
Barbara Hayes
Kim Usher
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Nutrition, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia, 2. Lynore K Geia is a proud woman of Bwgcolman, born and raised on Palm Island, Queensland.
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2013 Dec;46(1):13-7
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Narration
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Abstract
There is increasing recognition of Indigenous perspectives from various parts of the world in relation to storytelling, research and its effects on practice. The recent emergence of storytelling or yarning as a research method in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island studies and other Indigenous peoples of the world is gaining momentum. Narratives, stories, storytelling and yarning are emerging methods in research and has wide ranging potential to shape conventional research discourse making research more meaningful and accessible for researchers. In this paper we argue for the importance of Indigenous research methods and Indigenous method(ology), within collaborative respectful partnerships with non-Indigenous researchers. It is imperative to take these challenging steps together towards better outcomes for Indigenous people and their communities. In the Australian context we as researchers cannot afford to allow the gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and mainstream Australia health outcomes to grow even wider. One such pathway is the inclusion of Aboriginal storytelling or yarning from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait perspective within Indigenous and non-Indigenous research paradigms. Utilising Aboriginal storytelling or yarning will provide deeper understanding; complementing a two-way research paradigm for collaborative research. Furthermore, it has significant social implications for research and clinical practice amongst Indigenous populations; thus complementing the biomedical medical paradigm.
PubMed ID
24716757 View in PubMed
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