Skip header and navigation

Refine By

6 records – page 1 of 1.

A participatory food costing model in Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118355
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(4):181-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Patricia Williams
Michelle Amero
Barbara Anderson
Doris Gillis
Rebecca Green-LaPierre
Christine Johnson
Debra Reimer
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(4):181-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Capacity building
Community-Based Participatory Research
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet - economics - ethnology
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Models, Economic
Nova Scotia
Nutrition Policy
Abstract
In recognition of the growing challenge that food insecurity has on population health, a multisectoral partnership in Nova Scotia has been working since 2001 to address province-wide accessibility to a nutritious diet. The participatory food costing (PFC) model has been at the forefront of provincial and national efforts to address food insecurity; a local foods component was incorporated in 2004. This model has engaged community partners, including those affected by food insecurity, in all stages of the research, thereby building capacity at multiple levels to influence policy change and food systems redesign. By putting principles of participatory action research into practice, dietitians have contributed their technical, research, and facilitation expertise to support capacity building among the partners. The PFC model has provided people experiencing food insecurity with a mechanism for sharing their voices. By valuing different ways of knowing, the model has facilitated much-needed dialogue on the broad and interrelated determinants of food security and mobilized knowledge that reflects these perspectives. The development of the model is described, as are lessons learned from a decade of highly productive research and knowledge mobilization that have increased stakeholders' understanding of and involvement in addressing the many facets of food security in Nova Scotia.
PubMed ID
23217445 View in PubMed
Less detail

Molecular characterization of syphilis in patients in Canada: azithromycin resistance and detection of Treponema pallidum DNA in whole-blood samples versus ulcerative swabs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151733
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2009 Jun;47(6):1668-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Irene E Martin
Raymond S W Tsang
Karen Sutherland
Peter Tilley
Ron Read
Barbara Anderson
Colleen Roy
Ameeta E Singh
Author Affiliation
Division of Pathogenic Neisseria, Syphilis Diagnostics, and Vaccine Preventable Bacterial Diseases, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3R2, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2009 Jun;47(6):1668-73
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Azithromycin - pharmacology
Blood - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Syphilis - diagnosis - microbiology
Treponema pallidum - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Ulcer - microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although detection of Treponema pallidum DNA in whole-blood specimens of syphilis patients has been reported, it is uncertain at what stage of the disease such specimens are most suitable for the molecular diagnosis of syphilis. Also, few studies have directly compared the different gene targets for routine laboratory diagnostic usage in PCR assays. We examined 87 specimens from 68 patients attending two urban sexually transmitted disease clinics in Alberta, Canada. PCR was used to amplify the T. pallidum tpp47, bmp, and polA genes as well as a specific region of the 23S rRNA gene linked to macrolide antibiotic susceptibility. In primary syphilis cases, PCR was positive exclusively (75% sensitivity rate) in ulcerative swabs but not in blood specimens, while in secondary syphilis cases, 50% of the blood specimens were positive by PCR. Four out of 14 (28.6%) of our PCR-positive syphilis cases were found to be caused by an azithromycin-resistant strain(s). Our results confirmed that swabs from primary ulcers are the specimens of choice for laboratory diagnostic purposes. However, further research is required to determine what specimen(s) would be most appropriate for molecular investigation of syphilis in secondary and latent syphilis.
Notes
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2001 Feb;39(2):601-511158114
Cites: J Clin Pathol. 2008 Mar;61(3):390-517557863
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2001 Jun 1;183(11):1601-611343208
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2001 Aug;40(4):163-611576788
Cites: Sex Transm Infect. 2003 Dec;79(6):479-8314663125
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Jul 8;351(2):154-815247355
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1972 Feb;48(1):1-124552588
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1987 Jul;156(1):183-83298452
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1987 Oct;107(4):492-53307583
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Lett. 1990 Mar 15;56(3):233-82187739
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1991 Jan;29(1):62-91993770
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1991 Sep;29(9):1976-841774324
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1992 Feb;30(2):497-5001537923
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1992 Apr;30(4):831-81374079
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1996 Jul;174(1):219-218655999
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Jun;35(6):1348-529163442
Cites: Infect Immun. 1998 Jun;66(6):2509-139596709
Cites: Sex Transm Dis. 1998 Sep;25(8):408-149773432
Cites: New Microbiol. 1999 Apr;22(2):99-10410322608
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2005 Feb;51(2):143-515698722
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2006 Feb 1;42(3):337-4516392078
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Jan 31;174(3):34916446481
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2006 May 15;42(10):1431-816619156
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Jan;45(1):93-617065262
Cites: Infect Immun. 2007 Jun;75(6):2954-817438037
Cites: Sex Transm Infect. 2007 Jun;83(3):189-9217244664
Cites: Sex Transm Dis. 2007 Jul;34(7):472-417589329
Cites: J Invest Dermatol. 2007 Oct;127(10):2345-5017554371
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2001 May;39(5):1941-611326018
PubMed ID
19339468 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of reverse sequence syphilis screening on new diagnoses of late latent syphilis in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123372
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2012 Jul;39(7):528-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Jennifer Gratrix
Sabrina Plitt
Bonita E Lee
Leslie Ferron
Barbara Anderson
Bob Verity
Errol Prasad
Roxanne Bunyan
George Zahariadis
Ameeta E Singh
Author Affiliation
Public Health Division, Alberta Health Services-Edmonton Area, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2012 Jul;39(7):528-30
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Contact Tracing
Female
Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody-Absorption Test - methods
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical - prevention & control
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sensitivity and specificity
Syphilis Serodiagnosis - methods
Syphilis, Latent - diagnosis - enzymology - epidemiology
Treponema pallidum - isolation & purification
Abstract
After the introduction of reverse sequence syphilis screening in Alberta, Canada, there was an increase in the diagnosis of late latent syphilis in individuals screening positive with the treponemal test; these cases required additional public health follow-up.
PubMed ID
22706214 View in PubMed
Less detail

Seroreversion of treponemal tests in infants meeting canadian surveillance criteria for confirmed early congenital syphilis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120723
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Mar;32(3):199-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Ameeta E Singh
Tamara Guenette
Jennifer Gratrix
Joshua Bergman
Penny Parker
Barbara Anderson
Sabrina S Plitt
Bonita E Lee
Joan L Robinson
Author Affiliation
Alberta Health Services-Edmonton STI Clinic, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ameeta@ualberta.ca
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Mar;32(3):199-202
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Serologic Tests
Syphilis, Congenital - diagnosis
Abstract
Few data exist on the serologic outcome of treponemal tests in congenital syphilis.
A chart review was conducted on all confirmed early congenital syphilis cases in Edmonton, Canada, from 2005-2010.
Of the 16 cases identified, 11 (69%) infants seroreverted their treponemal tests by 18 months. Cases that did not serorevert their treponemal tests were statistically more likely to have delayed treatment and to have higher maternal rapid plasma reagin titers at birth.
Our data suggest that the majority of early congenital syphilis cases will serorevert their treponemal tests by 18 months.
PubMed ID
22976052 View in PubMed
Less detail

Seroprevalence and correlates of HIV and HCV among injecting drug users in Edmonton, Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144472
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):50-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sabrina S Plitt
Jennifer Gratrix
Sharyn Hewitt
Patsy Conroy
Tracy Parnell
Beverly Lucki
Vicki Pilling
Barbara Anderson
Yogesh Choudri
Chris P Archibald
Ameeta E Singh
Author Affiliation
Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Communicable Disease and Infection Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):50-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - etiology - transmission
Health Surveys
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - etiology - transmission
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sexual Behavior
Statistics as Topic
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - complications
Abstract
Injection drug users (IDUs) are at risk for acquiring human immunodefiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) via parenteral and sexual transmission. We determined the seroprevalence and correlates of HIV and HCV for IDUs recruited in Edmonton, Alberta.
Edmonton was one site of a multi-site, national survey (I-Track Study). From April to June 2005, IDUs were recruited and administered a questionnaire collecting information on demographics, drug use, sexual behaviours, and HIV/HCV testing behaviours. Finger-prick blood samples were collected for serology testing. Seroprevalence of HIV and HCV was determined and correlates of infection were assessed using logistic regression.
Of 275 IDUs, 68% were male, the median age was 38 years and 70.6% were Aboriginal. HIV prevalence was 23.9%, HCV prevalence was 66.1% and HIV/HCV co-infection was 22.8%. Cocaine (36.9%) was reported to be the drug injected most often in the previous six months. Correlates for HIV were sex trade (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.0-8.3) for women, and older age (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.2) and needle exchange program (NEP) use (OR 5.7, 95% CI 1.3-23.7) for men. For women, having a casual sex partner was protective for HCV (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.10-0.78). Independent correlates for HCV among males included age (AOR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.3) and younger age of first injection (AOR 0.92, 95% CI 0.87-0.96).
The high HIV and HCV prevalence found in this study among IDUs in Edmonton highlights the complex needs of the IDU community and the continued need for targeted programming.
PubMed ID
20364539 View in PubMed
Less detail

Molecular typing of Treponema pallidum strains in western Canada: predominance of 14d subtypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142942
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2010 Sep;37(9):544-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Irene E Martin
Raymond S W Tsang
Karen Sutherland
Barbara Anderson
Ron Read
Colleen Roy
Stephanie Yanow
Kevin Fonseca
Wanda White
Kami Kandola
Ettienne Kouadjo
Ameeta E Singh
Author Affiliation
Division of Pathogenic Neisseria, Syphilis Diagnostics, and Vaccine Preventable Bacterial Diseases, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2010 Sep;37(9):544-8
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Azithromycin - pharmacology
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Bacterial - analysis - genetics - isolation & purification
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Macrolides - pharmacology
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology
Molecular Typing
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Syphilis - epidemiology - microbiology
Treponema pallidum - classification - drug effects - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Resurgence of syphilis in Canada and worldwide requires laboratories to update their methods for molecular epidemiology investigation and surveillance. This study utilizes polymerase chain reaction diagnostic tests for syphilis, identifies macrolide resistance, and uses a molecular typing system to characterize Treponema pallidum clinical strains causing syphilis in Alberta and Northwest Territories, Canada.
In total 449 specimens including genital swabs, whole blood, sera, and cerebrospinal fluid were obtained from 374 patients with suspect syphilis in Alberta and Northwest Territories. Molecular subtyping was based on genetic characterization of treponemal repeat genes, arp and tpr. Detection of macrolide resistance was accomplished by identification of the 23S rRNA gene mutation associated with the resistance pattern.
Forty-nine specimens obtained from 43 patients were found to be positive for T. pallidum DNA using bmp, tpp47 and polA polymerase chain reaction assays. Four molecular subtypes were identified, with one type, 14d, accounting for 70% of all cases and 83% of typeable strains. Seven patients (16%) were found to be infected by macrolide-resistant strains, of which 6 were men who have sex with men and 1 whose infection was acquired in China.
A single molecular type of T. pallidum, characterized as 14d, caused the majority of the syphilis cases identified in this study. A more discriminatory typing method would be required to determine if these strains are clonal. Treatment of infectious syphilis with macrolide antibiotics should be restricted to patient populations where resistance is rare and clinical and serological follow up of patients is possible.
PubMed ID
20539263 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.