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22 records – page 1 of 3.

[Follow-up report of fifty one 19-year old patients after orthognathic treatment obtained from interviews].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233441
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1988 Mar;98(5):178-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
B. Ogaard
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1988 Mar;98(5):178-81
Date
Mar-1988
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Norway
Orthodontics, Corrective
PubMed ID
3166129 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of white spot lesions in 19-year-olds: a study on untreated and orthodontically treated persons 5 years after treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229845
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 1989 Nov;96(5):423-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
B. Ogaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 1989 Nov;96(5):423-7
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Caries - epidemiology - pathology
Dental Enamel - pathology
Female
Fluorides - administration & dosage
Humans
Male
Mouthwashes
Norway
Orthodontic Appliances - adverse effects
Prevalence
Time Factors
Tooth Movement - instrumentation
Toothpastes
Abstract
In the present study the prevalence of white spot lesions (initial enamel lesions) on the vestibular surfaces was recorded in 19-year-olds subjected to and not subjected to orthodontic treatment. Fifty-one orthodontic patients and 47 untreated subjects were examined. On the average, 5.7 years had elapsed since orthodontic appliances were removed. The median white spot score was significantly higher in the orthodontic group than in the untreated group. The orthodontically treated subjects also had more teeth with white spot lesions than the untreated subjects. The highest prevalence was noted on the first molars in both groups. In the orthodontic group the mandibular canines and premolars and the maxillary lateral incisors were also affected. The present study showed that white spot lesions after orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances may present an esthetic problem, even more than 5 years after treatment.
PubMed ID
2816842 View in PubMed
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[Reasons for the great reduction in caries levels in Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39238
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1986 May;96(8):351-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
B. Ogaard
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1986 May;96(8):351-5
Date
May-1986
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Humans
Norway
Oral Hygiene
PubMed ID
3462671 View in PubMed
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[Continued reduction of incidence of caries among children and young adults in USA]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37981
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1989 Nov;99(19):758-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
B. Ogaard
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1989 Nov;99(19):758-62
Date
Nov-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Dental Caries - epidemiology
English Abstract
Humans
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The article presents data from National Institute of Health on the prevalence of dental caries in 5-17 year olds in 1986-87 in USA. The data were compared with a previous study from 1979-80. Almost 50% of the children had no caries experience in 1986-87 compared with 36% in 1979-80. The DMFS data showed a reduction of about 36%, the mean for 1979-80 and 1986-87 being 4.77 and 3.07, respectively. The survey results showed that decay on the smooth surfaces of teeth, the surfaces that benefit most from fluoride, is disappearing. Today, two-thirds of caries is found on the occlusal surfaces of teeth. In Norway, the percentage of 5-year-olds without caries experience and mean DMFT in 12- and 18-year-olds have been registered since 1984. The American data are therefore not easily comparable with the situation in Norway. However, the mean DMFS values in 18-year-olds is hardly less than 13, whereas the average DMFS value of US 17-year-olds in 1986-87 was 8.04. The NIDR survey did not address the question of what is causing the decline in dental caries. The most likely reason is the widespread use of fluoride and in particular use of fluoride dentifrices. Fluoride dentifrices were introduced on the American marked in the 1950s, and in Norway in 1971. It is speculated that a further decline in dental caries may be expected also in Norway.
PubMed ID
2637995 View in PubMed
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Incidence of filled surfaces from 10-18 years of age in an orthodontically treated and untreated group in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38138
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1989 May;11(2):116-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989
Author
B. Ogaard
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1989 May;11(2):116-9
Date
May-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Dental Caries - etiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Female
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Mouthwashes - therapeutic use
Norway
Orthodontics, Corrective - adverse effects
Toothpaste - therapeutic use
Abstract
The present study was conducted to examine the incidence and location of filled surfaces from 10-18 years of age in individuals subjected to and not subjected to treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Each group comprised 65 individuals. About 5 years had elapsed since the appliances were removed. No statistically significant difference in filled surfaces was found between the groups at age 10 to 18. The incidence in filled surfaces from 10-18 years was 6.34 in the orthodontic group, and 7.22 in the untreated group. The difference was not statistically significant. The distribution of fillings in the dentition in the two groups showed no significant differences. Most of the fillings were recorded in the fissures of the molars. In the first molars most of the fillings in the fissures were already present at the age of 10. It was concluded that in individuals with relatively low caries activity, the present fluoride regimes are sufficient to prevent any excess caries lesion development requiring filling during or after orthodontic therapy.
PubMed ID
2767142 View in PubMed
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[Dummy- and finger-sucking habits among 5-year old children. An investigation of frequency and effect on the dentition and occlusion]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38172
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1989 Apr;99(6):206-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1989
Author
B. Ogaard
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1989 Apr;99(6):206-12
Date
Apr-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Fingersucking
Humans
Infant
Malocclusion - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
Dummy- and finger-sucking habits were investigated among 60 5 year olds, born in 1982. The children were living in Raufoss, a small rural community in eastern part of Norway. Information about the sucking habits was obtained from their parents by means of questionnaires. The position of the teeth and the occlusion were registered by an orthodontist. Total prevalence of sucking habits was 63%. Thirty-seven percent, had used a dummy and 30% had been or were still finger-suckers. Two children had both used a dummy and sucked their fingers. This is a significant lower total prevalence of sucking habits than recorded in recent Swedish and Danish studies (1-8), but comparable with a Swedish study from 1971 (9). Most dummy-suckers had broken their habits at 3-4 years of age, while the finger-suckers were still active at 5 years of age. Finger-sucking had the largest impact on the position of the front teeth. The finger-suckers had significantly larger overjet and smaller overbite, more proclined upper incisors and retroclined lower incisors than dummy-suckers and those without any sucking habit. The only measurable effect of previous dummy-sucking of 5 years of age was a more open position of the lips and a smaller overbite. Otherwise, no significant effect on the occlusion was observed in any of the dummy- or fingersuckers.
PubMed ID
2626325 View in PubMed
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[Collaboration between general practitioners and orthodontists]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73872
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1989 Jun;99(10):384-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
O. Borge
B. Ogaard
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1989 Jun;99(10):384-8
Date
Jun-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Female
General Practice, Dental
Humans
Male
Norway
Orthodontics
Public Health Dentistry
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
The orthodontic service in Norway is mainly performed in private practices. However, in Oppland county, in the eastern part of Norway, there are several public orthodontic clinics. Financial support for orthodontic treatment is minimal whether carried out by private or public orthodontists. The public dentist has the main responsibility for diagnosing. The present study was conducted to examine the collaboration between general public dentists and orthodontists in Oppland county. The study was based on telephone interviews with 48 dentists. More than 90% of the dentists claimed that the orthodontic services in their district was sufficient. 81% felt that there was no orthodontic overtreatment. Written contact with the orthodontist was more common than oral communication (telephone). 31% of the dentists had weekly contact with the orthodontist, and 50% had monthly contact with the orthodontist. One third of the dentists expressed a desire for regular meetings with the orthodontist. Nearly two-thirds of the dentists preferred the orthodontist having the responsibility of diagnosing malocclusions. 81% were well satisfied with the treatment results. 63% rarely observed adverse effects of orthodontic treatment. The most common indications for recommending orthodontic treatment were functional disorders and prophylactic measures, and 65% considered the esthetic aspect of a malocclusion less important when referring a patient to an orthodontist. 62% felt that the financial support for orthodontic treatment in Norway today was unsatisfactory. 42% of those interviewed were of the opinion, that orthodontic services should be free, whereas 54% thought that orthodontic services should be only partly subsidized.
PubMed ID
2633136 View in PubMed
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Hypodontia in 9-year-old Norwegians related to need of orthodontic treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36108
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1993 Oct;101(5):257-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
B. Aasheim
B. Ogaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1993 Oct;101(5):257-60
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anodontia - classification - epidemiology - therapy
Bicuspid - abnormalities
Child
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incisor - abnormalities
Male
Mandible
Maxilla
Norway - epidemiology
Orthodontics, Corrective - classification - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Abstract
The present study reports on the prevalence of hypodontia in a Norwegian population and classifies children with hypodontia according to need of orthodontic treatment. Orthopantomograms of 1953 children (960 girls and 993 boys) at the age of 9 were available for examination. Of the boys registered with hypodontia of second premolars at the age of 9, 11.3% showed late mineralization between the ages of 9 and 12. Only 2.9% of the girls showed late mineralization. The corrected prevalence of hypodontia, excluding third molars, in the girls was 7.2%, in the boys 5.8%, and in both sexes combined 6.5%, the difference between sexes not being statistically significant. Of the children with hypodontia, 86.6% lacked only one or two permanent teeth. The most frequently missing teeth were the mandibular second premolars, the maxillary second premolars, and the maxillary lateral incisors, in that order. Classification of children with hypodontia according to need of orthodontic treatment showed that about two-thirds had hypodontia only of single posterior teeth with a moderate need of treatment. About one-third had hypodontia involving anterior teeth, and only 3.1% had hypodontia of two or more teeth in the same quadrant with a great need of treatment.
PubMed ID
8248724 View in PubMed
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Incidence and prediction of filled teeth from 12 to 18 years of age in a district in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37194
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1991 Apr;99(2):106-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
B. Ogaard
M. Rösler
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1991 Apr;99(2):106-12
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Discriminant Analysis
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Probability
Prognosis
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The present study investigated whether the incidence or prevalence of filled teeth/approximal surfaces at one age could be predictive for the incidence in another period or for the prevalence at the age of 18. The study was conducted in 12-18-yr-olds in Norway. Regression analysis showed that the best prognosis for subsequent incidence of filled teeth/approximal surfaces could be made at the age of 15. By using regression analysis or discriminant analysis it was possible at the age of 15 to predict with high accuracy those who would acquire more fillings than the median at the age of 18. Discriminant analysis with one predictor variable is suggested for clinical use. The variable that discriminated best between above and below median number of new fillings in the period 15-18 yr was untreated lesions in the inner half of the enamel in the approximal surfaces of premolars and molars at the age of 15. From the use of simple prediction tools, it was concluded that individuals at the age of 15 with a low prevalence of filled teeth/filled approximal surfaces and without untreated approximal lesions would be subjected to a low incidence of new fillings until the age of 18.
PubMed ID
2052891 View in PubMed
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[Cariological conditions in patients in a psychiatric hospital in Norway].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226792
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1991 Mar;101(5):144-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
B. Ogaard
I J Koxvig
Author Affiliation
Klinikk for Kjeveortopedi, Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1991 Mar;101(5):144-7
Date
Mar-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
DMF Index
Dental Care for Disabled
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
The caries status was recorded for 107 patients in a Norwegian psychiatric hospital in 1988. The number of edentulous patients was highest among patients older than 50 years (42%). Only two patients below 50 years of age were edentulous (5%). The average DMFT was 21.5 in the age group below 50 years and 26.8 in the age group above 50 years. The percentage number of patients with carious teeth (DT greater than 0) was 42% in those above 50 years and 60% in those below 50 years of age. On average, each patients used nearly 3 medicaments regularly. Most of the medicaments belonged to the antidepressiva and neuroleptica group which give nearly complete xerostomia. It is speculated that the reason for the high caries activity in the hospitalized psychiatric patients is due to irregular eating and oral hygiene habits in combination with complete or partial xerostomia. It is suggested that fluoride therapy (topical and tablets) and professional plaque control would be the most appropriate preventive measures.
PubMed ID
1830648 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.