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B-cell lineage confers a favorable outcome among children and adolescents with large-cell lymphoma: a Pediatric Oncology Group study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214620
Source
J Clin Oncol. 1995 Aug;13(8):2023-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
R E Hutchison
C W Berard
J J Shuster
M P Link
T E Pick
S B Murphy
Author Affiliation
State University of New York Health Science Center, Syracuse, USA.
Source
J Clin Oncol. 1995 Aug;13(8):2023-32
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antigens, CD30 - metabolism
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Immunophenotyping
Lymphoma, B-Cell - drug therapy - immunology - mortality
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse - drug therapy - immunology - mortality
Lymphoma, T-Cell - immunology - mortality - therapy
Male
Prognosis
Risk factors
United States
Abstract
The goal of this study was to assess the immunophenotype of uniformly treated cases of pediatric large-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) to determine the prognostic importance of B-cell and T-cell lineages and of CD30 positivity.
Sixty-nine patients were analyzed by immunochemistry. All patients were classified histologically, staged in a uniform manner, and treated according to one of two protocols for localized (stage I and II) NHL or advanced (stage III and IV) large-cell NHL. Antibodies included anti-CD45, CD20, CD45Ra, MB-2 (not clustered), CD3, CD45Ro, CD43, CD15, CD30, and CD68. Statistical analysis used the exact conditional chi 2 and Kruskall-Wallace tests for clinical features and the log-rank test to evaluate event-free survival (EFS).
Immunophenotypic results demonstrated 25 B-cell, 23 T-cell, and 21 indeterminate lineage. Twenty-seven patients expressed CD30 (17 T-cell and 10 indeterminate lineage), and of these, 22 showed histology of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL). B-cell patients were older (P = .018) and showed more favorable survival than patients with T-cell or indeterminate lineage (96% EFS at 3 years, 96% v 67% and 74%, B v T and indeterminate lineage [P = .027]). B-cell lineage was seen more frequently in limited-stage patients, but was also associated with favorable survival when stratified for stage (P = .036). CD30 expression (P = .96) and ALCL histology (P = .90) did not show significant associations with survival.
We conclude that among pediatric large-cell lymphomas, B-cell lineage is proportionately less frequent than in adults and CD30 antigen-expressing lymphomas are frequent among patients with T-cell and indeterminate lineage. B-cell phenotype tends to occur in older children and is associated with superior survival.
PubMed ID
7636544 View in PubMed
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Canadian survey of clinical status at dialysis initiation 1998-1999: a multicenter prospective survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188002
Source
Clin Nephrol. 2002 Oct;58(4):282-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
B M Curtis
B J Barret
K. Jindal
O. Djurdjev
A. Levin
P. Barre
K. Bernstein
P. Blake
E. Carlisle
P. Cartier
C. Clase
B. Culleton
C. Deziel
S. Donnelly
J. Ethier
A. Fine
G. Ganz
M. Goldstein
J. Kappel
G. Karr
S. Langlois
D. Mendelssohn
N. Muirhead
B. Murphy
G. Pylpchuk
E. Toffelmire
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada.
Source
Clin Nephrol. 2002 Oct;58(4):282-8
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Creatinine - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - metabolism - physiopathology - therapy
Female
Food Habits
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - metabolism - physiopathology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis
Serum Albumin - metabolism
Treatment Outcome
Urban health
Abstract
The current growth in end-stage kidney disease populations has led to increased efforts to understand the impact of status at dialysis initiation on long-term outcomes. Our main objective was to improve the understanding of current Canadian nephrology practice between October 1998 and December 1999.
Fifteen nephrology centers in 7 provinces participated in a prospective data collection survey. The main outcome of interest was the clinical status at dialysis initiation determined by: residual kidney function, preparedness for chronic dialysis as measured by presence or absence of permanent peritoneal or hemodialysis access, hemoglobin and serum albumin. Uremic symptoms at dialysis initiation were also recorded, however, in some cases these symptom data were obtained retrospectively.
Data on 251 patients during 1-month periods were collected. Patients commenced dialysis at mean calculated creatinine clearance levels of approximately 10 ml/min, with an average of 3 symptoms. 35% of patients starting dialysis had been known to nephrologists for less than 3 months. These patients are more likely to commence without permanent access and with lower hemoglobin and albumin levels. Even of those known to nephrologists, only 66% had permanent access in place.
Patients commencing dialysis in Canada appear to be doing so in relative concordance with published guidelines with respect to timing of initiation. Despite an increased awareness of kidney disease, a substantial number of patients continues to commence dialysis without previous care by a nephrologist. Of those who are seen by nephrologists, clinical and laboratory parameters are suboptimal according to current guidelines. This survey serves as an important baseline for future comparisons after the implementation of educational strategies for referring physicians and nephrologists.
PubMed ID
12400843 View in PubMed
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Differences in the prevalence and severity of arthritis among racial/ethnic groups in the United States, National Health Interview Survey, 2002, 2003, and 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97342
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2010 May;7(3):A64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Julie Bolen
Linda Schieb
Jennifer M Hootman
Charles G Helmick
Kristina Theis
Louise B Murphy
Gary Langmaid
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Adult and Community Health, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Mailstop K-51, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. JBolen@cdc.gov
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2010 May;7(3):A64
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arthritis - diagnosis - ethnology
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
We describe the prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis and its impact on activities, work, and joint pain for 6 racial/ethnic groups: non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asians and Pacific Islanders, and multiracial or "other" respondents. We combined data from the 2002, 2003, and 2006 National Health Interview Survey (n = 85,784) and, after adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index, compared racial/ethnic differences. Arthritis-attributable activity limitation, arthritis-attributable work limitation, and severe joint pain were higher for non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, and multiracial or other respondents with arthritis compared with non-Hispanic whites with arthritis. Our finding that arthritis disproportionately affects certain racial/ethnic minorities may be useful for planning interventions.
PubMed ID
20394703 View in PubMed
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Epidemic of febrile gastroenteritis due to Salmonella java traced to smoked whitefish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110868
Source
Am J Public Health Nations Health. 1968 Jan;58(1):114-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1968

Estimating the quality of neonatal transport in California.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107022
Source
J Perinatol. 2013 Dec;33(12):964-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
J B Gould
B H Danielsen
L. Bollman
A. Hackel
B. Murphy
Author Affiliation
1] Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA [2] California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
Source
J Perinatol. 2013 Dec;33(12):964-70
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking - methods
California
Canada
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Logistic Models
Quality of Health Care - standards
ROC Curve
Risk Adjustment
Transportation of Patients - standards
Abstract
To develop a strategy to assess the quality of neonatal transport based on change in neonatal condition during transport.
The Canadian Transport Risk Index of Physiologic Stability (TRIPS) score was optimized for a California (Ca) population using data collected on 21 279 acute neonatal transports, 2007 to 2009, using models predicting (2/3) and validating (1/3) mortality within 7 days of transport. Quality Change Point 10th percentile (QCP10), a benchmark of the greatest deterioration seen in 10% of the transports by top-performing teams, was established.
Compared with perinatal variables (0.79), the Ca-TRIPS had a validation receiver operator characteristic area for prediction of death of 0.88 in all infants and 0.86 in infants transported after day 7. The risk of death increased 2.4-fold in infants whose deterioration exceeded the QCP10.
We present a practical, benchmarked, risk-adjusted, estimate of the quality of neonatal transport.
PubMed ID
24071907 View in PubMed
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European cultural offshoots in the new world: differences in their mental hospitalization patterns. Part II: German, Dutch, and Scandinavian influences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246201
Source
Arch Psychiatr Nervenkr. 1980;228(2):161-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
H B Murphy
Source
Arch Psychiatr Nervenkr. 1980;228(2):161-74
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Germany - ethnology
Great Britain - ethnology
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - ethnology
Religion
Scandinavia - ethnology
Sex Factors
Social Conditions
Abstract
The mental hospitalization rates for Canadians of German, Dutch, and Scandinavian origin are significantly below the rates for Canadians generally and even for Canadians of British origin, although the latter are the more advantaged in the society. The better-than-average picture proves to derive from the males much more than from the females, which weighs against a genetic explanation, and it is unlikely to be due to differences in use of psychiatric services. Examination of rates for subcategories of the population, and a review of the literature on these and other Canadian sub-cultures, suggests that the mental health advantages experienced by these males may be due in part to family structure and in part to religious influences.
PubMed ID
7458639 View in PubMed
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Exploring a new type of alcoholism survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247119
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1979 Jun;8(2):119-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1979
Author
H B Murphy
J C Negrete
M. Tousignant
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1979 Jun;8(2):119-26
Date
Jun-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Canada
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Abstract
A new type of method for surveying alcoholism and alcohol-abuse was tested in a way designed to cover about 20% of adults in a town of 50 000. The method proved able to identify types of alcohol-abuser which other survey techniques have difficulty with; it made no undue demands on respondents; and it is much more economical than conventional household surveys. However, more work is still needed on it, and for certain types of information the customary self-report is still going to be required.
PubMed ID
528108 View in PubMed
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Geography of intestinal permeability and absorption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202902
Source
Gut. 1999 Apr;44(4):483-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
I S Menzies
M J Zuckerman
W S Nukajam
S G Somasundaram
B. Murphy
A P Jenkins
R S Crane
G G Gregory
Author Affiliation
St Thomas's Hospital, Lambeth Palace Road, London SE1 7EH, UK.
Source
Gut. 1999 Apr;44(4):483-9
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
HIV Infections - physiopathology
Humans
Intestinal Absorption
Malabsorption Syndromes - ethnology - physiopathology
Monosaccharides - diagnostic use - urine
Permeability
Poverty
Sensitivity and specificity
Topography, Medical
Tropical Climate
Abstract
Intestinal morphology and function vary geographically.
These functions were assessed in asymptomatic volunteers in European, North American, Middle Eastern, Asian, African, and Caribbean countries.
Five hour urine collections were obtained from each subject following ingestion of a 100 ml iso-osmolar test solution containing 3-0-methyl-D-glucose, D-xylose, L-rhamnose, and lactulose after an overnight fast, to assess active (3-0-methyl-D-glucose) and passive (D-xylose) carrier mediated, and non-mediated (L-rhamnose) absorption capacity, as well as intestinal permeability (lactulose:rhamnose ratio).
A comparison of results for subjects from tropical countries (n=218) with those resident in the combined temperate and subtropical region (Europe, United States, Qatar) (n=224) showed significant differences. Residents in tropical areas had a higher mean lactulose:rhamnose ratio and lower mean five hour recoveries of 3-0-methyl-D-glucose, D-xylose, and L-rhamnose, indicating higher intestinal permeability and lower absorptive capacity. Investigation of visiting residents suggested that differences in intestinal permeability and absorptive capacity were related to the area of residence. Subjects from Texas and Qatar, although comprised of several ethnic groups and resident in a subtropical area, showed no significant difference from European subjects.
There are clearly demarcated variations in intestinal permeability and absorptive capacity affecting asymptomatic residents of different geographical areas which correspond with the condition described as tropical enteropathy. Results suggest the importance of environmental factors. The parameters investigated may be relevant to the predisposition of the indigenous population and travellers to diarrhoeal illness and malnutrition. Intestinal function in patients from the tropics may be difficult to interpret, but should take into account the range of values found in the asymptomatic normal population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
10075954 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.