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Background factors and management of ectopic pregnancy in Sweden. Changes over a decade.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65516
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1987;66(7):597-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
J. Thorburn
B. Friberg
W. Schubert
A C Wassen
B. Lindblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1987;66(7):597-602
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chorionic Gonadotropin - metabolism
Comparative Study
Dilatation and Curettage
Female
Genital Diseases, Female - complications
Humans
Intrauterine Devices - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Ectopic - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Ultrasonography
Abstract
Hospital records of all women operated on for ectopic pregnancy (EP) in four Swedish towns during 1970-72 and 1980-82 were elaborated. The gynecological and obstetrical background was noted and the clinical picture and management was recorded and analysed. The incidence of EP more than doubled between the two periods. There was no major change in classical background factors between the periods, but the proportion of IUCD users rose from 4 to 16 percent. The use of hCG assays, curettage and ultrasound in establishing the diagnosis increased markedly and the proportion of women with ruptured tubes and heavy intra-abdominal bleeding decreased. Moreover there was a clear tendency towards a more conservative surgical approach in the latter period.
PubMed ID
3326392 View in PubMed
Less detail

Background factors of ectopic pregnancy. I. Frequency distribution in a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236222
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1986 Dec;23(5-6):321-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
J. Thorburn
C. Berntsson
M. Philipson
B. Lindblom
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1986 Dec;23(5-6):321-31
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - surgery
Abortion, Legal - adverse effects
Abortion, Spontaneous - complications
Adolescent
Adult
Contraception
Curettage - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - complications
Intrauterine Devices, Copper - adverse effects
Menstruation Disturbances - complications
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease - complications
Postoperative Complications
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Ectopic - etiology
Sweden
Uterus - surgery
Abstract
Two hundred and five patients with ectopic pregnancy in a well-defined Swedish population were interviewed with respect to prior disease and pregnancy histories as well as various constitutional and socioeconomic factors. The results were compared with those of two control groups, i.e. 110 early pregnant women intending to continue the gestation to term as well as 101 women seeking voluntary interruption of pregnancy. The results provide evidence that several may be involved in the etiology of ectopic pregnancy, including abdominal (or pelvic) surgery, previous ectopic pregnancy and pelvic inflammatory disease. Furthermore, a history of infertility is strongly correlated to ectopic pregnancy. On the other hand, there is no evidence that uncomplicated spontaneous or induced abortion, parity or marital status are important factors.
PubMed ID
3803684 View in PubMed
Less detail

Background factors of ectopic pregnancy. II. Risk estimation by means of a logistic model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236221
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1986 Dec;23(5-6):333-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
J. Thorburn
M. Philipson
B. Lindblom
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1986 Dec;23(5-6):333-40
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - surgery
Abortion, Legal
Adult
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - complications
Intrauterine Devices, Copper - adverse effects
Postoperative Complications
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Ectopic - etiology
Probability
Prognosis
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
Based on the frequency distribution in a previous case-control study of ectopic pregnancy in Sweden, the prognostic value of a number of risk factors was analysed. A logistic procedure was applied in a stepwise manner, resulting in a risk-scoring model in which the probability of ectopic pregnancy can be determined on the basis of four background factors.
PubMed ID
3803685 View in PubMed
Less detail

Campylobacter upsaliensis, C. sputorum sputorum and C. concisus as common causes of diarrhoea in Swedish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35527
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1995;27(2):187-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

Concordance between results of optic disc tomography and high-pass resolution perimetry in glaucoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50892
Source
J Glaucoma. 2000 Feb;9(1):28-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
L M Martin
B. Lindblom
U K Gedda
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Glaucoma. 2000 Feb;9(1):28-33
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Glaucoma - diagnosis
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Ocular Hypertension - diagnosis
Optic Disk - pathology
Perimetry - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Tomography - methods
Visual Fields
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate concordance between results obtained with the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) (Heidelberg Engineering GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany) and those obtained with the high-pass resolution perimeter (HRP) in glaucoma diagnosis. METHODS: A total of 217 patients from the glaucoma services at St. Erik Eye Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden (n = 107) and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden (n = 110) were included in the study. All patients were examined because of known or suspected glaucoma in at least one eye. The conventional indices presented by the instruments were used, i.e., glaucoma index from the HRT (negative values = abnormal, positive = normal) and combined deviation (upper normal limit 2.1 dB) from the HRP. RESULTS: The concordance regarding the classification of normal or glaucomatous by the two instruments was 71% (153/217 eyes). The HRT indicated glaucoma but HRP findings were normal in 47 patients, and the reverse occurred in 17 patients. There was a significant difference in optic disc area between patients with abnormal HRT findings and normal HRP findings and in patients with normal HRT findings and abnormal HRP findings. The concordance could not be improved by adjusting for disc size. The correlation between combined deviation on HRP and the HRT glaucoma index was r = -0.53. CONCLUSION: A significant correlation was found between the combined index given by HRP and the HRT glaucoma index in 217 patients examined for known or suspected glaucoma. Discordant findings were observed in 64 patients; in 22 this discordance was explained by the influence of disc size. No other reasons for differences in examination results could be detected.
PubMed ID
10708228 View in PubMed
Less detail

A cost-effectiveness study of a randomised trial of laparoscopy versus laparotomy for ectopic pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64596
Source
Lancet. 1995 May 6;345(8958):1139-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-6-1995
Author
D T Gray
J. Thorburn
P. Lundorff
A. Strandell
B. Lindblom
Author Affiliation
Section of Clinical Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
Source
Lancet. 1995 May 6;345(8958):1139-43
Date
May-6-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Laparoscopy - economics
Laparotomy - economics
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Ectopic - surgery
Pregnancy, Tubal - surgery
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We compared the cost-effectiveness of therapeutic laparoscopy and open laparotomy for treatment of laparoscopically diagnosed ectopic pregnancy. Clinical outcomes of ectopic pregnancy treatment were based on results of a randomised trial done between 1987 and 1989 at Sahlgrenska University Hospital (Göteborg, Sweden). We estimated costs for inpatient and follow-up care of ectopic pregnancy by the two methods. Observed resource use (eg, procedure duration) was multiplied by 1992 estimates of resource unit cost (eg, cost per minute of laparoscopy time), based on detailed internal cost accounting data from Huddinge University Hospital. By specified criteria, the initial procedure eliminated trophoblastic activity without major complications in 81% (95% CI: 68-90) of 52 laparoscopy patients, versus 95% (85-99) of 57 laparotomy patients. Residual trophoblast or complications were successfully treated in all remaining patients. Mean simulated costs (standard error) for the overall laparoscopy strategy were 28,058 (1780) Swedish kronor versus 32,699 (1080) kronor for laparotomy (p = 0.03). In the baseline simulation and most sensitivity analyses, laparoscopy produced final outcomes equivalent to those of laparotomy at lower costs. As laparoscopic outcomes improve, this newer approach should become increasingly preferable.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 May 6;345(8958):1127-87723539
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Sep 2;346(8975):638-97651025
PubMed ID
7723545 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differential diagnosis of early human pregnancies: impact of different diagnostic measures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65001
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 1992;33(4):216-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
J. Thorburn
I. Bryman
M. Hahlin
B. Lindblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 1992;33(4):216-20
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chorionic Gonadotropin - blood
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Health Status Indicators
Hospitals, University
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Tests - methods - standards
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy, Ectopic - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Progesterone - blood
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Ultrasonography, Prenatal - standards
Abstract
A total of 261 women in early pregnancy, either with mild symptoms of ectopic pregnancy (EP) or being at an increased risk for this condition, were included in a longitudinal study. The effectiveness of different diagnostic measures in obtaining correct final diagnoses was analyzed. In addition to clinical findings and symptoms, the use of serum human chorionic gonadotropin, serum progesterone, endovaginal sonography and a risk score for EP were all proven to be valuable in distinguishing normal intrauterine pregnancies from pathological pregnancies.
PubMed ID
1505809 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early antibiotic treatment of reactive arthritis associated with enteric infections: clinical and serological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14494
Source
BMJ. 1990 Dec 8;301(6764):1299-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-1990
Author
A. Frydén
A. Bengtsson
U. Foberg
B. Svenungsson
B. Castor
A. Kärnell
R. Schvarcz
B. Lindblom
E. Kihlström
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
BMJ. 1990 Dec 8;301(6764):1299-302
Date
Dec-8-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Arthritis, Infectious - drug therapy - etiology - immunology - pathology
Bacterial Infections - complications
Female
HLA Antigens - analysis
Humans
Immunoglobulins - analysis
Intestinal Diseases - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Yersinia Infections - complications - immunology
Yersinia enterocolitica - immunology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To find out whether a 10-14 days' course of antibiotics early in the course of reactive arthritis associated with enteric infections could reduce the severity and duration of the disease and whether the antibody response in patients with reactive arthritis associated with yersinia infection differed between those treated and those not treated with the antibiotics. DESIGN--Prospective multicentre trial in which patients were randomised to treatment or no treatment with antibiotics. Patients were seen at three and six weeks and three, six, nine, 12, and 18 months after their first visit. SETTING--Departments of infectious diseases in three hospitals in Linköping, Malmö, and Stockholm, Sweden. PATIENTS--40 Consecutive patients who had had symptoms of reactive arthritis associated with enteric infection for less than four weeks. INTERVENTIONS--20 Patients were allocated to treatment with antibiotics and 20 patients did not receive antibiotics. All patients received non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and four also received intra-articular steroid injections after at least six weeks' observation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Arthritic symptoms assessed clinically and by using Ritchies' index; blood measurements reflecting inflammatory activity; serum IgG, IgM, and IgA antibody titres; HLA tissue type. RESULTS--No difference was observed concerning duration of arthritis, grade of inflammation, and number of joints affected between patients treated and those not treated with antibiotics. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the two groups in erythrocyte sedimentation rate and haptoglobin, IgG, and IgA concentrations. All values had returned to normal within three months. No patient developed chronic arthritis, but sustained slight arthralgia occurred in three patients. The HLA-B27 antigen was found in 23 (58%) of the patients, and its presence did not affect clinical outcome. The IgG, IgM, and IgA antibody responses were similar in patients treated with antibiotics and those not treated. CONCLUSION--Short term antibiotic treatment has no beneficial effect on the clinical outcome of reactive arthritis associated with enteric infection.
PubMed ID
2271852 View in PubMed
Less detail

Enterotoxigenicity and frequency of Campylobacter jejuni, C. coli and C. laridis in human and animal stool isolates from different countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37840
Source
FEMS Microbiol Lett. 1990 Jan 1;54(1-3):163-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-1990
Author
G B Lindblom
M. Johny
K. Khalil
K. Mazhar
G M Ruiz-Palacios
B. Kaijser
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Bacteriology, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Lett. 1990 Jan 1;54(1-3):163-7
Date
Jan-1-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Campylobacter - analysis - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Campylobacter fetus - analysis - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Chickens - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Enterocolitis - epidemiology - microbiology
Enterotoxins - analysis
Feces - microbiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Swine - microbiology
Virulence
Abstract
Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli strains were collected during three different years from adult patients with enterocolitis in Sweden (n = 372) from 49 patients in Kuwait, and Campylobacter strains from hens from Mexico, Pakistan and Sweden (n = 107) and Swedish pigs (n = 47). C. jejuni was the predominant species in human and hen isolates, and C. coli in pigs C. coli was significantly more common in human isolates from Sweden, and more common in hen isolates from Pakistan, than in hens from Sweden and Mexico. C. laridis was only isolated from pigs (17%) and was in no case enterotoxigenic. Both in human and hen isolates, C. jejuni strains were more enterotoxigenic than C. coli strains. C. jejuni strains from Swedish hens were less enterotoxigenic than those from Pakistan and Mexico (P less than 0.001), and strains from pigs were less enterotoxigenic than those from hens (P less than 0.001). We conclude that C. jejuni are more often enterotoxigenic and possibly more virulent than c. coli and C. laridis. The relative frequency of C. jejuni and C. coli in humans and animals differs from one country to another.
PubMed ID
2323537 View in PubMed
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Fatal intoxication cases: cytochrome P450 2D6 and 2C19 genotype distributions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178546
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2004 Oct;60(8):547-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
A L Zackrisson
P. Holmgren
A B Gladh
J. Ahlner
B. Lindblom
Author Affiliation
National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics,, University Hospital, 581 85 Linköping, Sweden. annza@imv.liu.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2004 Oct;60(8):547-52
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylases - genetics
Blood Donors
Case-Control Studies
Cytochrome P-450 CYP2D6 - genetics
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - metabolism
Drug Overdose - epidemiology - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Mixed Function Oxygenases - genetics
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Many commonly used pharmaceuticals, such as antidepressants and neuroleptics as well as some illegal drugs, are metabolised by the cytochrome P450 enzyme debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6). Of Caucasians, 7-10% lack this enzyme, which can, upon administration of drugs in normal therapeutic doses, lead to adverse reactions and unexpected intoxication, leading in turn even to a fatal outcome in some cases.
Individuals (n=242) who had died due to intoxication by pharmaceuticals were genotyped for CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 and compared with a reference group of 281 blood donors. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) method was used to identify five CYP2D6 alleles: *1 (wt), *2, *3, *4 and *6. The allele *5, a complete gene deletion, was identified by a multiplex amplification of long DNA fragments. Four CYP2C19 alleles *1 (wt), *2, *3 and *4 were also identified by SNP analysis.
The prevalence of the CYP2D6 poor metaboliser (PM) genotypes in individuals with fatal intoxication was lower (4.7%) than expected from the frequencies of these genotypes in the blood donors (8.5%). A significantly lower frequency P
PubMed ID
15349706 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.