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Dentine-lead levels and dental caries in First Nation children from the western James Bay region of northern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186605
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2003 Mar;70(3):409-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
L J S Tsuji
J D Karagatzides
R M Hanning
B. Katapatuk
J. Young
E. Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, 200 University Avenue West, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada.
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2003 Mar;70(3):409-14
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Dental Caries - epidemiology - etiology
Dentin - chemistry
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Lead - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
PubMed ID
12592511 View in PubMed
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Elevated dentine-lead levels in deciduous teeth collected from remote first nation communities located in the western James Bay region of northern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191965
Source
J Environ Monit. 2001 Dec;3(6):702-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
L J Tsuji
J D Karagatzides
B. Katapatuk
J. Young
D R Kozlovic
R M Hannin
E. Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, ON, Canada.
Source
J Environ Monit. 2001 Dec;3(6):702-5
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Child
Dentin - chemistry
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Lead - analysis
Male
Meat
Ontario
Rural Population
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
Teeth were collected from First Nation schoolchildren inhabiting the remote western James Bay region of northern Ontario, Canada. Lead levels in dentine chips were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, for naturally exfoliated deciduous teeth. Within exfoliated teeth (one tooth supplied per person), no significant differences in lead concentrations between tooth type were found (P = 0.36). The mean lead concentration of exfoliated teeth of 9.2 microg g(-1) dry weight (N = 61) from this remote region was comparable to levels reported by others for children inhabiting urban centers or residing near smelters. Further, 24.6% (N = 15) had elevated dentine-lead levels ( > 10 microg g(-1)). Lead levels in soil, water, and air have been reported as being low and unimportant sources of exposure for people of the western James Bay area. Evidence is reviewed suggesting that lead contaminated game meat was one source of environmental lead exposure. Consumption data indicate that wildlife is still an important food source for First Nation people of the western James Bay region; 98% (46/47) of the children surveyed consumed some type of wild meat.
PubMed ID
11785648 View in PubMed
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