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[ADP-based records in primary health care. Rationalization or reorganization?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211894
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 May 10;116(12):1470-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1996
Author
B. Hofmann
J. Tørstad
Author Affiliation
Telenor Forskning og Utvikling, Tromsø
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 May 10;116(12):1470-3
Date
May-10-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Efficiency, Organizational
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Norway
Primary Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
Computer-based patient record systems have become very common in the primary health service, but their effects have seldom been documented. Three surveys were carried out in the municipality of Sør-Varanger, in 1993, 1994 and 1995, to discover how such a system has affected the running of the municipal medical centres. The most significant changes were organisational. Certain tasks changed hands, others were dispensed with, and new ones were added. Information on patients became more readily available, and services to the public were improved. Many more patients received an answer to questions concerning information in the case record, and far fewer forms had to be filled in manually. Despite this, computerisation had seemingly led to little change in effectiveness, and the total load of work remained the same. The survey also showed that simple extensions to the system could produce marked improvements.
PubMed ID
8650636 View in PubMed
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A multiparameter, PC-based telemetry unit for biomedical signals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68990
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 1996;2(3):143-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
B. Hofmann
Author Affiliation
Telenor Research, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 1996;2(3):143-7
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances
Comparative Study
Computer Communication Networks - instrumentation
Humans
Rural Health Services
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Telemetry - instrumentation
Telephone
Abstract
A low-cost, general-purpose telemetry system was developed for use in rural health centres, hospitals, ambulances and clinics. It was designed to transmit a range of analogue biomedical signals using various communications media. The system was tested using different telephone systems, including mobile telephony. The results showed a maximum sample rate of 1.6 kHz using the public telephone network. With three data channels the system produced sample rates of 500 Hz at 8 bit/sample. Typical overall delay times were below 100 ms. Mobile tests showed that the GSM telephone was superior to the Nordic mobile telephone (NMT 900). In field tests, sample rates of 990 Hz were obtained using GSM telephony. Bit error rates were less than 10(-7) for all applications and high-fidelity regeneration was obtained at the receiver. The tests showed that the system was well suited for telemetry of analogue biomedical signals in a broad range of telemedicine applications.
PubMed ID
9375048 View in PubMed
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Sexually transmitted diseases, antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, and subsequent development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Visitors of homosexual sauna clubs in Copenhagen: 1982-1983.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8668
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 1988 Jan-Mar;15(1):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Hofmann
P. Kryger
N S Pedersen
J O Nielsen
J. Oehlenschlager
E A Koerner
T. van den Berg
H H Sprechler
C M Nielsen
J. Gerstoft
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 1988 Jan-Mar;15(1):1-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - immunology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Denmark
HIV Seropositivity - complications - epidemiology
Hepatitis A - epidemiology - immunology
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - immunology
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - immunology
Steam Bath
Syphilis - epidemiology - immunology
Abstract
Sera from 260 men from Denmark and elsewhere attending two Copenhagen sauna clubs for homosexual men during nine months of 1982-1983 were investigated for markers for syphilis, hepatitis A and B, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Five per cent (12 men) had active syphilis, and another 35% (92) had a history of and/or serologic markers for syphilis. Ninety-four men (36%) were positive for antibodies to hepatitis A virus, ten (4%) were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and 153 (59%) were positive for antibodies to HBsAg. Antibodies to HIV were found in 45 (20%) of the 220 men investigated for this marker. Markers for hepatitis A and B and for syphilis were more frequent in the HIV antibody-positive individuals, but the association was significant only for markers for hepatitis B (relative risk = 2.0). Thus STD markers had little predictive value for seropositivity for antibodies to HIV. Among 37 men investigated more than once, a seroconversion rate of 3% per month for antibodies to HIV was found, but this estimate must be taken with reservation. The rate of seropositivity for antibodies to HIV among men from Denmark was 23%, and three (8%) of the 40 HIV-positive Danish men developed the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) during the four years following the initial investigation. This study shows that by 1982-1983 HIV had spread considerably in the Danish high-risk group, although there were only seven reported cases of AIDS in the country at that time.
PubMed ID
3358236 View in PubMed
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[Syphilis among homosexual men attending 2 sauna clubs in Copenhagen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238923
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1985 Apr 29;147(18):1461-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-29-1985

Variation in caries treatment proposals among dentists in Norway: the best interest of the child.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292616
Source
Eur Arch Paediatr Dent. 2017 10; 18(5):345-353
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2017
Author
A Rønneberg
A B Skaare
B Hofmann
I Espelid
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Dentistry and Behavioural Science, Faculty of Dentistry, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. anne.ronneberg@odont.uio.no.
Source
Eur Arch Paediatr Dent. 2017 10; 18(5):345-353
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Behavior Therapy
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Clinical Decision-Making - ethics
Conscious Sedation
Dental Anxiety - therapy
Dental Care for Children - psychology - standards
Dental Caries - psychology - therapy
Female
General Practice, Dental - ethics - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Norway
Restraint, Physical
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To explore variation in treatment-related-decisions for severe caries in children among dentists in the Public Dental Service (PDS) in Norway. It was also to evaluate the treatment choices in relation to the best interest of children and a child's rights to enjoy the highest standard of health care.
A pre-coded questionnaire was sent electronically to all general dental practitioners (GDPs) working in the PDS in eight counties in Norway (n = 611). The questionnaire included two case scenarios to reflect common dental conditions related to severe caries among 5-year-old children. Paediatric dentists and paediatric students were invited to validate the different treatment options. Frequency distributions and statistical analyses were carried out using Chi square statistics.
The response rate was 65% (n = 391) among the GDPs. A majority of the GDPs preferred a new appointment with behaviour management techniques (BMT) to a child presenting pulpitis and pain. Dentists educated outside the Nordic region would use restraint more often as a treatment alternative when the child was in pain than Nordic-educated dentists (p\0.05). Dentists with less than 10 years of experience preferred BMT and sedation more often when the child was in pain than their older colleagues, who, however, preferred a waiting approach and no immediate treatment if the child was not in pain(p\0.05) [corrected].
Use of BMT and sedation is related to region of education and years of experience. Awareness of ethical principles with the child´s best interest in mind, should receive increased attention.
Notes
ErratumIn: Eur Arch Paediatr Dent. 2017 Aug 28;: PMID 28849581
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PubMed ID
28748395 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.