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Alcohol consumption modifies the total lung capacity in smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11300
Source
Respiration. 1996;63(2):66-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K. Ström
L. Janzon
B S Hanson
B. Hedblad
H E Rosberg
M. Arborelius
Author Affiliation
Department of Lung Medicine, Central Hospital Karlskrona, Sweden.
Source
Respiration. 1996;63(2):66-72
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Airway Obstruction - epidemiology
Alcohol Drinking
Energy intake
Humans
Male
Nutrition
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking
Total lung capacity
Abstract
Smoking-related airflow obstruction can develop with or without emphysema. Moderate alcohol consumption has been suggested to diminish the risk of centrilobular emphysema caused by smoking. Our aim was to study the influence of total energy and nutrient (protein, fat, carbohydrate and alcohol) intake on smoking-related emphysema. Lung function and nutrient intake including alcohol consumption were recorded at age of 68 years in 478 men as part of the population study 'Men Born in 1914' in Malmö, Sweden. In nonsmokers (n = 88) and ex-smokers (n = 223), there were no significant relationships between energy and nutrient intake and lung function. In smokers (n = 167), men in the highest and lowest quintile of total lung capacity (TLC) differed in alcohol intake (p = 0.004) but not in intake of total energy or other nutrients. In smokers with a forced expiratory volume in 1 s/vital capacity ratio of below 70% (n = 81), alcohol intake was positively correlated with TLC (r = 0.31; p = 0.006) after adjustment for smoking and body mass index. We conclude that in men with smoking-related airway obstruction, emphysema defined as large TLC was associated with high alcohol consumption but not with the intake of total energy or other nutrients.
PubMed ID
8966368 View in PubMed
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[Angina pectoris is an expensive national disease. It requires a reasonable distribution of responsibility between outpatient and inpatient care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54389
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 May 20;95(21):2430-2, 2435-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1998

Area social characteristics and carotid atherosclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166391
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Aug;17(4):333-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
M. Rosvall
G. Engström
B. Hedblad
L. Janzon
G. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. maria.rosvall@med.lu.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Aug;17(4):333-9
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular diseases
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To explore the effect of social characteristics of residential areas on carotid atherosclerosis prevalence.
The associations among area social characteristics and B-mode ultrasound determined carotid plaque-score (a semi-quantitative scale measuring the degree of atherosclerosis in the carotid bifurcation area) were cross-sectionally investigated in a general population sample of 4033 men and women. Area socioeconomic circumstances were described through a social deprivation index calculated from migration rate, percentage residents with foreign citizenship among those with foreign background, dependency on social welfare support, and employment rate. Living in socially deprived areas was associated with an increased carotid plaque-score in both men (P for trend = 0.004) and women (P for trend = 0.007). These associations were only slightly reduced after adjustment for individual level indicators with a decrease of the absolute mean difference in carotid plaque-score between worse-off and better-off areas of 9% for men and 13% for women, whereas adjustment for risk factors turned the trend non-significant in women, however, not in men.
Those living in socially deprived areas in general had more extensive carotid atherosclerosis. However, in these areas there were a substantial number of individuals with low degrees of carotid atherosclerosis and vice versa. Thus, with regard to conceptual ideas of causal inference, the social characteristics of an area seem to be associated with the prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis. However, with regard to benefits of prevention, focusing on geographical areas would probably give a restricted benefit, where only some high-risk individuals would be reached.
PubMed ID
17121741 View in PubMed
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Association between CD8+ T-cell subsets and cardiovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116822
Source
J Intern Med. 2013 Jul;274(1):41-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
D. Kolbus
I. Ljungcrantz
L. Andersson
B. Hedblad
G N Fredrikson
H. Björkbacka
J. Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2013 Jul;274(1):41-51
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antigens, CD56 - analysis
Biological Markers - blood
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Cardiovascular Diseases - immunology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Carotid Stenosis - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Cytokines - secretion
Female
Flow Cytometry
Humans
Incidence
Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit - analysis
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Leukocytes - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The findings of experimental studies suggest that the immune system plays a key role in atherosclerosis, but the clinical importance of different immune cells in cardiovascular disease remains poorly characterized. In this study we investigated the association between CD8(+) T cells and carotid disease as well as development of cardiovascular disease events.
The study cohort comprised 700 subjects from the cardiovascular arm of the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, obtained at the 1991-1994 baseline investigation and stored at -140 °C, were thawed and the different CD8(+) T-cell populations analysed by flow cytometry. Baseline carotid intima-media thickness and stenosis were assessed by ultrasonography and clinical events were monitored through validated national registers.
Subjects with a high fraction of CD8(+) T cells were characterized by decreased cytokine release from activated leucocytes, metabolic signs of insulin resistance and increased incidence of coronary events; hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the second and third tertiles of CD8(+) T cells were 2.57 (1.16, 5.67) and 2.61 (1.19, 5,71), respectively, in a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Correlations were found between the fraction of CD8(+) CD25(+) T cells and the degree of carotid stenosis (r = 0.11, P
PubMed ID
23356723 View in PubMed
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Asymptomatic leg and carotid atherosclerosis in smokers is related to degree of ventilatory capacity: longitudinal and cross-sectional results from 'Men born in 1914', Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10282
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Mar;155(1):237-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
G. Engström
B. Hedblad
S. Valind
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, S-20502, Malmö, Sweden. gunnar.esgstrom@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Mar;155(1):237-43
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arteriosclerosis - physiopathology
Blood pressure
Carotid Artery Diseases - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Leg - blood supply
Lipids - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Respiratory Mechanics
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Although smoking is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), many individuals remain healthy after many years of smoking. The population based cohort 'Men born in 1914' was used to investigate whether the occurrence of non-invasively detected atherosclerosis among smokers is associated with lung function [(i.e. height-adjusted forced expiratory volume during 1 s (FEV1.0) and vital capacity (VC)]. Two hundred and seven smokers without history of CVD were examined with spirometry and calf plethysmography at 55 years, and with spirometry, ankle-arm blood pressure recordings and ultrasound examinations of the carotid arteries at 68 years. Eighty-three men had atherosclerosis defined as carotid stenosis >30% or ankle-arm index
PubMed ID
11223447 View in PubMed
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Asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis is reduced by regular physical activity. Longitudinal results from the cohort "men born in 1914".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49883
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2001 Jun;21(6):502-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
G. Engström
M. Ogren
B. Hedblad
P. Wollmer
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2001 Jun;21(6):502-7
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Leg - blood supply
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study whether physical activity is associated with reduced occurrence of asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis. DESIGN: Longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses of the population-based cohort "men born in 1914". METHODS: Comparison of the systolic ankle/arm pressure index (AAI) at age 68 in groups who were sedentary, performed some activity, and performed regular physical training at 55 and 68 years of age. RESULTS: At 55 years of age, 100 (27%) were sedentary, 209 (58%) reported some physical activity and 54 (15%) reported regular physical training. At 68 years, 194 men (53%) reported the same degree of physical activity, 127 (35%) reported a higher physical activity, and 42 (12%) reported lower physical activity. Physical activity at 55 years (p =0.03) and increased physical activity between 55 and 68 years (p =0.03) were both associated with higher AAI at 68 after adjusting for potential confounders. At 68 years, AAI was 0.89+/-0.21, 1.01+/-0.13 and 1.05+/-0.11, respectively, in men who were sedentary, reported some physical activity, and regular physical training (p =0.0002). This association remained significant after adjustments for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: regular physical activity is associated with reduced occurrence of asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis, even in men taking up exercise after age of 55.
PubMed ID
11397023 View in PubMed
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Biased risk factor assessment in prospective studies of peripheral arterial disease due to change in exposure and selective mortality of high-risk individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67642
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 1996 Dec;3(6):523-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
M. Ogren
B. Hedblad
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 1996 Dec;3(6):523-8
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arteries
Bias (epidemiology)
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - complications
Hypertension - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Peripheral Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Our aim was to assess whether risk factor assessment in prospective studies of peripheral disease (PAD) might be biased by change in exposure and selective mortality of individuals at high risk. METHODS: The cohort 'Men born in 1914' has been followed since the baseline examination 1969. PAD, (i.e. ankle-brachial pressure index
PubMed ID
9100088 View in PubMed
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Cardiac arrhythmias and stroke: increased risk in men with high frequency of atrial ectopic beats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54147
Source
Stroke. 2000 Dec;31(12):2925-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
G. Engström
B. Hedblad
S. Juul-Möller
P. Tydén
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital (Sweden). Gunnar.Engstrom@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Stroke. 2000 Dec;31(12):2925-9
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arrhythmia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Atrial Premature Complexes - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Cerebrovascular Accident - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Comorbidity
Drug Resistance, Multiple
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: With the exception of atrial fibrillation (AF), little scientific attention has been given the associations between cardiac arrhythmias and incidence of stroke. We sought to study whether atrial and ventricular arrhythmias assessed during a 24-hour ambulatory ECG registration are associated with incidence of stroke. METHODS: The population-based cohort "Men Born in 1914" was examined with 24-hour ambulatory ECG registrations at 68 years of age. Four hundred two men without previous myocardial infarction or stroke were included, and 236 of them had hypertension (>/=160/95 mm Hg or treatment). Fourteen-year rates of stroke (fatal and nonfatal) and all-cause mortality were updated from national and regional registers. Frequent or complex ventricular arrhythmias was defined as Lown class 2 to 5. A high frequency of atrial ectopic beats (AEB) was defined as the fifth quintile (ie, >/=218 AEB per 24 hours). RESULTS: Fifty-eight men suffered a first stroke during the follow-up. Stroke rates (per 1000 person-years) among men with AF (n=14), with frequent AEB (n=77), and without AF or frequent AEB (n=311) were 34.5, 19.5, and 11.6, respectively. The corresponding values among men with hypertension were 40.7, 32.3, and 14.7, respectively. Frequent AEB (compared with absence of AF and frequent AEB) was significantly associated with stroke among all men (relative risk=1.9; 95% CI, 1.02 to 3.4; P:=0.04) and among hypertensive men (relative risk=2.5; 95% CI, 1.3 to 4.8; P:=0.009) after adjustments for potential confounders. The increased stroke rates among men with Lown class 2 to 5 did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: A high frequency of AEB is associated with an increased incidence of stroke.
Notes
Comment In: Stroke. 2001 Jun;32(6):1443-811387515
PubMed ID
11108750 View in PubMed
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Ceruloplasmin and atrial fibrillation: evidence of causality from a population-based Mendelian randomization study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106739
Source
J Intern Med. 2014 Feb;275(2):164-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
S. Adamsson Eryd
M. Sjögren
J G Smith
P M Nilsson
O. Melander
B. Hedblad
G. Engström
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2014 Feb;275(2):164-71
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atrial Fibrillation - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Biological Markers - blood
Ceruloplasmin - genetics - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Gene Frequency
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mendelian Randomization Analysis
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Inflammatory diseases and inflammatory markers secreted by the liver, including C-reactive protein (CRP) and ceruloplasmin, have been associated with incident atrial fibrillation (AF). Genetic studies have not supported a causal relationship between CRP and AF, but the relationship between ceruloplasmin and AF has not been studied. The purpose of this Mendelian randomization study was to explore whether genetic polymorphisms in the gene encoding ceruloplasmin are associated with elevated ceruloplasmin levels, and whether such genetic polymorphisms are also associated with the incidence of AF.
Genetic polymorphisms in the ceruloplasmin gene (CP) were genotyped in a population-based cohort study of men from southern Sweden (Malmö Preventive Project; n = 3900). Genetic polymorphisms associated with plasma ceruloplasmin concentration were also investigated for association with incident AF (n = 520) during a mean follow-up of 29 years in the same cohort. Findings were replicated in an independent case-control sample (The Malmö AF cohort; n = 2247 cases, 2208 controls).
A single nucleotide polymorphism (rs11708215, minor allele frequency 0.12) located in the CP gene promoter was strongly associated with increased levels of plasma ceruloplasmin (P = 9 × 10(-10) ) and with AF in both the discovery cohort [hazard ratio 1.24 per risk allele, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.44, P = 0.006] and the replication cohort (odds ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.02-1.26, P = 0.02).
Our findings indicate a causal role of ceruloplasmin in AF pathophysiology and suggest that ceruloplasmin might be a mediator in a specific inflammatory pathway that causally links inflammatory diseases and incidence of AF.
Notes
Comment In: J Intern Med. 2014 Feb;275(2):191-424188106
PubMed ID
24118451 View in PubMed
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Changes in blood pressure and body weight following smoking cessation in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67272
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Feb;255(2):266-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
E. Janzon
B. Hedblad
G. Berglund
G. Engström
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Division of Epidemiology, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. Ellis.Janzon@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Feb;255(2):266-72
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Pressure - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Smoking Cessation
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Few have studied the long-term effects of smoking and smoking cessation on weight gain and blood pressure increase and compared with the age-related increases experienced by most adults. This study compared the development of weight and blood pressure in female never smokers, continuing smokers and smokers who quit smoking. DESIGN: Weight, systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure and smoking habits were assessed at baseline and re-assessed after a mean follow-up of 9.0 +/- 5.8 years. SETTING: Population-based cohort. SUBJECTS: A total of 2381 female never smokers and 1550 female smokers. At the re-examination, 388 of the smokers had quit smoking. RESULTS: Mean weight gain was 7.6 +/- 6.1, 3.2 +/- 5.8 and 3.7 +/- 5.2 kg, respectively, in quitters, continuing smokers and never smokers (P or = 160/95 mmHg or treatment) was significantly higher in quitters [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.8; CI: 1.4-2.5] when compared with continuing smokers (OR: 1.3; CI: 1.07-1.6) and never smokers (reference). CONCLUSION: Over a long follow-up, weight gain was approximately 3-4 kg higher in quitters when compared with continuing smokers or never smokers. Although the differences in blood pressure increase were moderate, smoking cessation was associated with an increased incidence of hypertension.
PubMed ID
14746564 View in PubMed
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73 records – page 1 of 8.