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N.I.S.S. Nursing Information Systems Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233096
Source
AARN News Lett. 1988 May;44(5):18-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988
Author
B. Hall
Source
AARN News Lett. 1988 May;44(5):18-9
Date
May-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Information Systems
Nursing
Nursing Care
Saskatchewan
PubMed ID
3389065 View in PubMed
Less detail

Rehabilitation in the Swedish hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245288
Source
Rehabil Lit. 1980 Nov-Dec;41(11-12):290-1
Publication Type
Article
Source
J Nurs Care. 1982 Feb;15(2):14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1982

Giants in chest medicine: Lawrence D. H. Wood, MD, PhD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256707
Source
Chest. 2014 Jul;146(1):13-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014

A framework for the analysis of psychiatric health facility utilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231539
Source
Geogr Med. 1989;19:115-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
P. Kanaroglou
B. Hall
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Geogr Med. 1989;19:115-40
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Choice Behavior
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Deinstitutionalization
Female
Humans
Information Services - organization & administration
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Abstract
Existing research that examines the general problem of health facility use often lacks sound theoretical specification. This problem is partly a function of conceptual difficulties in explaining health seeking behaviour and an absence of appropriate data with which to calibrate modelling endeavours. These problems are addressed in this paper where a logit model of health seeking behaviour and health facility use derived from discrete choice theory is presented. The structure of the model is general but in this case it is developed in the context of mental health facility use. A data set from Auckland, New Zealand is utilized to apply the modelling ideas presented. Results show that discrete choice theory can be adapted to the problem of mental health facility usage under conditions where the health care system offers real choice at any given level of care. In this case real choice implies a well-developed array of alternative facilities to choose from.
PubMed ID
2767432 View in PubMed
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Assessment of ambulance response performance using a geographic information system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200637
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1999 Dec;49(11):1551-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
J. Peters
G B Hall
Author Affiliation
MapInfo Corporation, Troy, New York, USA. jeremy_peters@mapinfo.com
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1999 Dec;49(11):1551-66
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances - utilization
Catchment Area (Health)
Decision Support Systems, Management
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration - utilization
Geography
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Information Systems
Models, Theoretical
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Time Factors
Abstract
The accessibility, distribution and utilisation of emergency medical services are important components of health care delivery. The impact of these services on well-being is heightened by the fact that ambulance resources must respond in a reliable and timely manner to emergency calls from demand areas. However, many factors, such as the unavailability of an ambulance at a center closest to a call, can adversely influence response time. This paper discusses the design and implementation of a framework developed in a Geographic Information System for assessing ambulance response performance. A case study of ambulance response in three communities in Southern Ontario, Canada is presented that allows easy and rapid identification of anomalous calls that may adversely affect overall operating performance evaluation. Extensions of the framework into a fully fledged service deployment and planning decision support system are discussed.
PubMed ID
10515636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Housing for psychiatric survivors: values, policy and research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200124
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 1998 Mar;25(4):455-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998

An assessment of the effectiveness of the Mottep model for increasing donation rates and preventing the need for transplantation--adult findings: program years 1998 and 1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6067
Source
Semin Nephrol. 2001 Jul;21(4):419-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
C O Callender
M B Hall
D. Branch
Author Affiliation
National Minority Organ Tissue Transplant Education Program (MOTTEP), Howard University Hospital, Washington, DC 20060, USA.
Source
Semin Nephrol. 2001 Jul;21(4):419-28
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Charities - organization & administration
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - prevention & control - surgery
Kidney Transplantation - psychology
Male
Minority Groups - education
Models, Educational
Patient Participation
Primary Prevention
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sampling Studies
Tissue Donors - education - psychology
United States
Abstract
The National Minority Organ Tissue Transplant Education Program (MOTTEP) evaluated the effects of a community-implemented health education program for adult members of minority population groups to affect attitude, knowledge, and intent to change behavior. In addition, this study represents 1 of the first major initiatives to formally address prevention as a strategy to contribute to reducing the need for organ/tissue transplantation among minorities in the United States. The study targeted students (youth) and adults representing different ethnic groups (African-Americans, Alaskan Natives, Filipinos, Latinos, and Native Americans) who attended health education presentations addressing organ tissue donation, transplantation, and illness prevention in 15 different cities in churches, schools, and other sites. A cross-sectional study that used questionnaires was designed for collecting data from all participants. This article presents data on the adult sample only. Preintervention and postintervention data were collected from 914 adult participants to determine any immediate effects of the intervention. By using data from matched sets of the preintervention and postintervention questionnaires for all adult participants, there were significant increases in (P
PubMed ID
11455531 View in PubMed
Less detail

Social network transactions of psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224398
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1992 Feb;34(4):433-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
G. Nelson
G B Hall
D. Squire
R T Walsh-Bowers
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1992 Feb;34(4):433-45
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Affect
Aged
Deinstitutionalization
Female
Group Homes
Halfway Houses
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Ontario
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Social Support
Abstract
In this research we examine self-reported social network transactions of former psychiatric inpatients residing in different types of housing in the community. Unlike earlier research, we found considerable reciprocity in network transactions with family and friends. Only professionals provided more support than they received from patients. Providing emotional support to others was positively correlated with positive affect, community integration, and mastery. Respondents reported more supportive than unsupportive transactions with network members and more supportive transactions with friends than with family or professionals. Finally, residents of supportive apartments and group homes provided and received support more frequently than residents of board-and-care homes. We discuss the results in terms of their implications for policy and future research.
PubMed ID
1566125 View in PubMed
Less detail

20 records – page 1 of 2.