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Is intensive care justified for infants weighing less than 801 gm at birth?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243973
Source
J Pediatr. 1981 Dec;99(6):937-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1981
Author
S B Britton
P M Fitzhardinge
S. Ashby
Source
J Pediatr. 1981 Dec;99(6):937-43
Date
Dec-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Body Weight
Central Nervous System Diseases - etiology
Cephalometry
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - complications - mortality - therapy
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
During 1974-1977, 158 infants of birth weights less than 801 gm were referred from outlying hospitals. The survival rate was 25% for the whole group and 35% for those weighing 700 to 800 gm. Many were in a poor condition on arrival. One hundred and nineteen died. The most common causes of death were intracranial hemorrhage (39), RDS (26), and infection (13). Thirty-seven of the 39 survivors were followed until 18 months postterm. Growth failure was common--57% were below the third percentile in weight, 37% in length, and 17% in head circumference. Three had retrolental fibroplasia. Five children (14%) had major neurologic sequelae. Eight were severely handicapped with a Bayley score of less than 70 and ten were moderately handicapped with a Bayley score between 70 and 84, resulting in a neurodevelopmental handicap rate of 49%. Significant factors correlating with survival and intact outcome were birth weight greater than or equal to 700 gm, gestation greater than or equal to 26 weeks, the absence of asphyxia, and good condition on arrival at the NICU. There was no intact survival below 700 gm birth weight. The handicap rate of survivors between 700 and 800 gm was only 39%. Although intensive care in a referral unit may not be justified for those less than 700 gm, every effort should be made in the care of those 700 to 800 gm.
PubMed ID
7310590 View in PubMed
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Level of care for deinstitutionalized psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224811
Source
Health Rep. 1992;4(3):269-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
A. Richman
B. Britton
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre for Health Information, Statistics Canada.
Source
Health Rep. 1992;4(3):269-75
Date
1992
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Algorithms
Community Mental Health Services - economics
Deinstitutionalization
Health Care Costs
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Social Support
Abstract
The New York state Level-of-Care Survey (LOCS) was used in 1987-88 to assess the community care and social support needs of 936 mentally disabled community residents in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The cases were assigned an appropriate level-of-care by the computerized algorithm based on an 101-item questionnaire covering all aspects of the cases' physical and mental condition, needs and activities. Compared with their current setting, the algorithm assigned 60% of cases to the same level-of-care, 17% to a lower level, and 23% to a higher level-of-care. The net effect on social service costs of the reassignments would be a 7% increase. The increased costs for some cases ($1.5 million) would be partly offset by lowered costs for others ($900,000). The gradual shifting of 14 cases from the relatively expensive rehabilitation unit to more independent living at lower levels of care would compensate for most of the increases.
Notes
Erratum In: Health Rep 1992;4(4):438
PubMed ID
1493197 View in PubMed
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