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Excess prevalence of non diabetic renal disease in native American children in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210491
Source
Pediatr Nephrol. 1996 Dec;10(6):702-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
B. Bulloch
B D Postl
M R Ogborn
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Nephrol. 1996 Dec;10(6):702-4
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Diseases - congenital - epidemiology - genetics
Manitoba - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
We undertook a 1-year prospective point prevalence study to test the hypothesis that there is an excess of non-diabetic renal disease in native American children; 29.6% (73/247) of the population attending the only regional pediatric nephrology clinic in 1993 were native compared with 8.2% of the Manitoba population in this age group (odds ratio = 4.4, P
PubMed ID
8971883 View in PubMed
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Haemophilus influenzae meningitis in Manitoba and the Keewatin District, NWT: potential for mass vaccination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1016
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1988 Oct 15; 139(8):743-747.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
G W Hammond
B E Rutherford
R. Malazdrewicz
N. MacFarlane
N. Pillay
R B Tate
L E Nicolle
B D Postl
H G Stiver
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1988 Oct 15; 139(8):743-747.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Meningitis
Immunizations
Vaccine
Invasive Hib disease
Age Factors
Bacterial Vaccines - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Canada
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Diphtheria Toxoid - administration & dosage
European Continental Ancestry Group
Evaluation Studies
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Indians, North American
Infant
Inuits
Manitoba
Meningitis, Haemophilus - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Pentosephosphates - therapeutic use
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - therapeutic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vaccination
Abstract
A community-based surveillance study of all central nervous system infections was carried out in Manitoba and the Keewatin District, NWT, between Apr. 1, 1981, and Mar. 31, 1984. There were 201 cases of bacterial meningitis in Manitoba over the study period, 81 (40%) caused by Haemophilus influenzae; all but one isolate tested were type b (Hib). There were nine cases of H. influenzae meningitis in the Keewatin District. The overall annual incidence rate of H. influenzae meningitis in Manitoba was 2.5/100,000; for children under 5 years the rate was 32.1/100,000. For the Keewatin District the corresponding rates were 69.6/100,000 and 530/100,000. A total of 85% and 100% of the cases of H. influenzae meningitis occurred by 24 months of age in Manitoba and the Keewatin District respectively. The age at onset was earlier in native Indian children (22 cases) and Inuit children (9 cases) than in non-native children (59 cases) (p less than 0.005); thus, vaccine prevention of Hib meningitis will likely be more difficult in native Indian and M??©tis children. Without evaluating the increased potential of H. influenzae vaccines to prevent nonmeningitic forms of disease, we concluded that mass childhood vaccination with polyribosylribitolphosphate (PRP) vaccine is not warranted in Manitoba or the Keewatin District. Immunogenicity studies suggest that administration of conjugated Hib vaccines such as PRP-D in infancy may prevent approximately one-third to two-thirds of cases of H. influenzae meningitis; these vaccines warrant consideration for use in mass childhood vaccination programs.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1808.
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Injuries and deaths associated with off-road recreational vehicles among children in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234862
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Aug 15;137(4):297-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1987
Author
B D Postl
M E Moffatt
G B Black
C B Cameron
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Aug 15;137(4):297-300
Date
Aug-15-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Motorcycles
Recreation
Rural Population
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Injuries and deaths associated with off-road recreational vehicles are of increasing concern in North America. We reviewed all hospital admissions and deaths attributed to these vehicles in Manitoba from April 1979 to April 1985 among children 16 years of age or younger. Of the 693 hospital admissions and deaths 480 were associated with motorbikes, snowmobiles or all-terrain vehicles (ATVs). The incidence of injuries resulting from snowmobile and dirtbike accidents remained stable over the study period; however, there was an almost exponential increase in the number of admissions because of ATV-related injuries. There were 21 deaths during the study period. Preventive measures through legislation are necessary to reduce the numbers of injuries and deaths; these include mandatory registration, licensing and enhanced safety regulations.
Notes
Cites: N Y State J Med. 1978 Mar;78(4):628-33273753
Cites: Can J Surg. 1977 May;20(3):275-7858100
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Dec 13;113(11-12):1061-31201542
Cites: Pediatrics. 1978 Sep;62(3):280-7704196
Cites: Injury. 1979 Feb;10(3):178-82759363
Cites: Isr J Med Sci. 1980 Jan;16(1):45-657358516
Cites: CMAJ. 1986 Mar 1;134(5):540-23948066
Cites: J Trauma. 1985 Mar;25(3):232-33981676
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1981 Aug;71(8):818-227258443
Cites: CMAJ. 1986 Dec 15;135(12):1365-63779572
PubMed ID
3607680 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 May-Jun;84(3):150-2
Publication Type
Article

Vitamin D deficiency in a Manitoba community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220003
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Nov-Dec;84(6):394-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
J B Lebrun
M E Moffatt
R J Mundy
R K Sangster
B D Postl
J P Dooley
L A Dilling
J C Godel
J C Haworth
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Nov-Dec;84(6):394-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Manitoba - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Sciences - education
Rickets - etiology - prevention & control
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - complications - epidemiology
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
Using a cross-sectional survey, to investigate the vitamin D status of a random sample of 80 mother-child pairs (child age 3-24 months) in a Manitoba community with a high incidence of rickets.
A questionnaire on feeding habits, gestational history, maternal diet and vitamin supplements was administered to mothers in their homes with the assistance of a local interpreter. Venous blood was collected from both mother and child for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.
Of 91% babies initially breastfed, 36% received no formula or milk after weaning and 40% received no vitamin supplements. 24% of mothers took no vitamin supplements during pregnancy and lactation. Knowledge about rickets was poor. In 43% of children and 76% of mothers, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were below normal range.
Vitamin D levels are low in this population due to lack of fortified dairy products and vitamin D supplements. A public health program should include counseling on rickets and vitamin D supplementation for all infants and pregnant or lactating women.
PubMed ID
8131142 View in PubMed
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