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A 12-year cohort study on adverse pregnancy outcomes in Eastern Townships of Canada: impact of endometriosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256963
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Aziz Aris
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, Clinical Research Centre of Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre , Sherbrooke, Quebec , Canada.
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Endometriosis - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Peritoneal Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to provide a temporal-spatial reference of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) and examine whether endometriosis promotes APO in the same population. Among the 31?068 women who had a pregnancy between 1997 and 2008 in Eastern Townships of Canada, 6749 (21.7%) had APO. These APO increased significantly with maternal age and over time (r(2?)=?0.522, p?=?0.008); and were dominated by preterm birth (9.3%), pregnancy-induced hypertension (8.3%) including gestational hypertension (6.5%), low birth weight (6.3%), gestational diabetes (3.4%), pregnancy loss (2.2%) including spontaneous abortion (1.5%) and stillbirth (0.6%), intrauterine growth restriction (2.1%) and preeclampsia (1.8%). Among the 31?068 pregnancies, 784 (2.5%) had endometriosis and 183 (23.3%) had both endometriosis and APO. Endometriosis has been shown to increase the incidence of fetal loss (OR?=?2.03; 95% CI?=?1.42-2.90, p?
PubMed ID
24134807 View in PubMed
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Endometriosis-associated infertility: a decade's trend study of women from the Estrie region of Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143427
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2010 Nov;26(11):838-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Krystel Paris
Aziz Aris
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2010 Nov;26(11):838-42
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual
Endometriosis - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Rural Health - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
Endometriosis (ENDO) has been believed to increase during the last years, but recent data supporting this trend are lacking. The aim of this study was to verify whether the incidence of ENDO, infertility (INF) and the both increased during the last 10 years among women living in the Estrie region of Quebec. This retrospective cross-sectional study was realised using data from the CIRESS (Centre Informatisé de Recherche Evaluative en Services et Soins de Santé) system, the database of the CHUS (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke), Sherbrooke, Canada. Among the 6845 studied patients, 2564 had ENDO, 4537 were infertile and 256 suffered from both. According to the last 10 years, a significant increase in the number of cases with ENDO (r2 = 0.717, p = 0.001) and endometriosis-associated infertility (r2 = 0.601, p = 0.003) was noted, while INF remained stable (r2 = 2813 e-005, p = 0.987). We showed a prevalence of ENDO of 10.91%. Women with ENDO were at increased risk for being infertile (OR = 2.30; 95% CI = 2.014-2.626, p
PubMed ID
20486880 View in PubMed
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Maternal and fetal exposure to pesticides associated to genetically modified foods in Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136845
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2011 May;31(4):528-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Aziz Aris
Samuel Leblanc
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Sherbrooke Hospital Centre, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. aziz.aris@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2011 May;31(4):528-33
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aminobutyrates - adverse effects - blood - pharmacokinetics
Bacterial Proteins - blood
Biotransformation
Endotoxins - blood
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Food, Genetically Modified
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Glycine - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - blood - pharmacokinetics
Hemolysin Proteins - blood
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Exposure
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Organophosphorus Compounds - blood
Pesticides - adverse effects - blood - pharmacokinetics
Phosphoric Acids - blood
Pregnancy
Propionates - blood
Quebec
Abstract
Pesticides associated to genetically modified foods (PAGMF), are engineered to tolerate herbicides such as glyphosate (GLYP) and gluphosinate (GLUF) or insecticides such as the bacterial toxin bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between maternal and fetal exposure, and to determine exposure levels of GLYP and its metabolite aminomethyl phosphoric acid (AMPA), GLUF and its metabolite 3-methylphosphinicopropionic acid (3-MPPA) and Cry1Ab protein (a Bt toxin) in Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada. Blood of thirty pregnant women (PW) and thirty-nine nonpregnant women (NPW) were studied. Serum GLYP and GLUF were detected in NPW and not detected in PW. Serum 3-MPPA and CryAb1 toxin were detected in PW, their fetuses and NPW. This is the first study to reveal the presence of circulating PAGMF in women with and without pregnancy, paving the way for a new field in reproductive toxicology including nutrition and utero-placental toxicities.
Notes
Comment In: Reprod Toxicol. 2012 Jan;33(1):120-1; author reply 122-322074695
Comment In: Reprod Toxicol. 2011 Dec;32(4):494-5; author reply 496-722001252
Comment In: Reprod Toxicol. 2012 Jun;33(3):401-2; author reply 403-422382376
PubMed ID
21338670 View in PubMed
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