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Improving the recruitment and retention of doctors by training medical students locally.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130571
Source
Med Educ. 2011 Nov;45(11):1121-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Michel Landry
Aurel Schofield
Rachel Bordage
Mathieu Bélanger
Author Affiliation
Dieppe Family Medicine Unit, Vitalité Health Network, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada. michelh.landry@vitalitenb.ca
Source
Med Educ. 2011 Nov;45(11):1121-9
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Career Choice
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency - manpower
Male
New Brunswick
Personnel Selection
Physicians - supply & distribution
Questionnaires
Retention (Psychology)
Rural Health Services - manpower - organization & administration
Schools, Medical - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The global shortage of doctors is of concern. This is particularly true in French-speaking regions of New Brunswick, Canada, where there is no medical school. Since 1981, francophone medical students from New Brunswick have been able to undertake part of their training in their province through an agreement with medical schools in another province. We studied the effects of frequency and length of exposure to the province of origin during medical training on the likelihood that a doctor will ever or currently practise medicine in that province.
A questionnaire was sent to 390 francophone doctors from New Brunswick to collect information on history of medical training and practice. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify whether exposure to New Brunswick during medical training at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels affects the likelihood of ever or currently practising in the province.
A total of 263 doctors participated. Among family doctors, those with exposure to their province of origin in 1, 2, 3 or 4 years of undergraduate training were 2.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8-7.4), 2.5 (95% CI 0.7-8.6), 9.3 (95% CI 1.5-56.9) and 9.3 (95% CI 1.4-60.1) times more likely, respectively, to currently practise in New Brunswick than doctors who had experienced no exposure to the province during undergraduate training. Among specialty doctors, exposure to New Brunswick during undergraduate training had no effect on location of practice. Family and specialty doctors who had been exposed to New Brunswick during postgraduate residency were 5.9 (95% CI 2.3-14.9) and 3.2 (95% CI 0.9-11.6) times more likely, respectively, to practise in the province than doctors without postgraduate exposure.
Greater exposure to New Brunswick during medical training is associated with significantly better odds that doctors will be recruited to and retained in the province. Some effects are perceived for exposure during both undergraduate (most importantly in the final years) and postgraduate programmes.
PubMed ID
21988627 View in PubMed
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Perceived health status of Francophones and Anglophones in an officially bilingual Canadian province.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134241
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Mar-Apr;102(2):122-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mathieu Bélanger
Louise Bouchard
Isabelle Gaboury
Brigitte Sonier
Isabelle Gagnon-Arpin
Aurel Schofield
Paul-Emile Bourque
Author Affiliation
Centre de formation médicale du Nouveau-Brunswick, Pavilion J.-Raymond-Frenette, 15, rue des Aboiteaux, Moncton, NB E1A 3E9. mathieu.f.belanger@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Mar-Apr;102(2):122-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Health status
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - statistics & numerical data
New Brunswick
Abstract
It has been reported that being part of a minority group may be negatively associated with self-perceived health. The objective of this analysis was to determine whether there are differences in perceived health between the Francophone minority and Anglophone majority in New Brunswick, the only officially bilingual province in Canada.
Data from the first four primary cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey (2001 to 2007) were obtained for 17,729 New Brunswick residents. Odds of reporting good health among Francophones and Anglophones were compared using multivariate logistic regressions accounting for age, health-related behaviours, socio-demographic variables, and medical conditions.
In the final models, Francophone men and women were less likely than Anglophones to report their health as being good, although these differences were not statistically significant (Odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 0.88, 0.61-1.26; 0.71, 0.49-1.04, in men and women, respectively).
This study suggests that being part of the linguistic minority in New Brunswick is not associated with statistically significant differences in self-perceived health.
PubMed ID
21608384 View in PubMed
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Recruiting doctors from and for underserved groups: Does New Brunswick's initiative to recruit doctors for its linguistic minority help rural communities?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105858
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S44-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jacinthe Beauchamp
Mathieu Bélanger
Aurel Schofield
Rachel Bordage
Denise Donovan
Michel Landry
Author Affiliation
Centre de formation médicale du Nouveau-Brunswick. jacinthe.beauchamp@umoncton.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S44-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Choice
Female
Humans
Language
Logistic Models
Male
Medically underserved area
Minority Groups
Multivariate Analysis
New Brunswick
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Physicians - psychology - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution
Professional Practice Location - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Rural Health Services - manpower - organization & administration
Abstract
Within health care, there are underserved groups. New Brunswick's French-speaking minority, which also mostly lives in rural communities, is one such group. A physician shortage potentially prevents this population from accessing health promotion and clinical prevention services. This study analyzes whether New Brunswick Francophone doctors with rural backgrounds are more likely than doctors from urban regions to set up practice in rural communities of the province.
A questionnaire was sent to 390 New Brunswick Francophone physicians admitted in medicine between 1973 and 2000. It collected information on geographic origin and history of medical practice. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify whether a rural background is associated with the likelihood of ever and currently practicing in rural communities. We used the General Practice Rurality Index-simplified to quantify the rurality level of communities.
In total, 264 (67%) physicians participated. A rural background was positively associated with the establishment of a first medical practice in a rural community. This relationship was only significant among family physicians. There was no statistically significant relationship between rurality of community of origin and rurality of current community of practice among either family or specialty physicians.
Although Francophone doctors with a rural background were more likely than their urban counterparts to set up their first practice in a rural community, this effect was not sustained. This raises questions as to why they leave rural communities and highlights the importance of measures to retain doctors as a way to promote public health for underserved rural groups.
PubMed ID
24300320 View in PubMed
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Socially responsible medical education: innovations and challenges in a minority setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143761
Source
Med Educ. 2010 Mar;44(3):263-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Aurel Schofield
Daniel Bourgeois
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. schofia@umoncton.ca
Source
Med Educ. 2010 Mar;44(3):263-71
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
New Brunswick
Rural Health Services
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Distributed medical education sites help train, recruit and retain doctors, notably in rural and isolated areas, by providing education and training in these areas and adapting their curriculum to meet the host community's health needs.
The Centre de Formation Médicale du Nouveau Brunswick (CFMNB; New Brunswick Medical Education Centre) was established by a partnership between two academic institutions, the Université de Sherbrooke (University of Sherbrooke), situated in the province of Quebec, and the Université de Moncton (University of Moncton), situated in the province of New Brunswick, in Canada. The CFMNB is specifically targeting a minority community (Acadians). Working to establish a high-quality medical education programme, the CFMNB has also set community objectives to meet not only the health needs of this population, but also its social and economic needs.
This paper describes the overall objectives of this project, which are: to reduce the gap between community needs and academic institutional needs; to address ethno-cultural and language differences in a defined minority population, and to develop collaboration between the partners involved, including government and community entities which are often perceived as operating in isolation from one another. We also describe why and how the CFMNB developed community-focused objectives and the challenges that came with these innovations, and present lessons from the experience that may be relevant to other sites interested in the social responsibility of medical schools.
The CFMNB has produced interesting work and innovations in the field of social responsibility and has encountered many challenges. Continuing interaction between medical education, health research and health services to better address the needs of the population has been established. The information obtained by this process has been used to build a strategic plan for the CFMNB in order to ensure that it is socially responsive and has significant generalisable features.
Notes
Comment In: Med Educ. 2010 Mar;44(3):222-420444051
PubMed ID
20444057 View in PubMed
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[The society "Santé en Français": a successful Canadian model for partnership].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159960
Source
Educ Health (Abingdon). 2007 Aug;20(2):76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Aurel Schofield
Hubert Gauthier
Author Affiliation
Centre de formation médicale du Nouveau-Brunswick, Université de Moncton, Moncton. schofia@umoncton.ca
Source
Educ Health (Abingdon). 2007 Aug;20(2):76
Date
Aug-2007
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Networks - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Cooperative Behavior
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Models, organizational
Multilingualism
Organizational Case Studies
Organizations, Nonprofit - organization & administration
Abstract
Francophone Canadians living in a context where French is a minority language have poor access to health services in their native language. To remedy this situation, the Canadian Government has adopted a networking model inspired from the strategy "Towards Unity For Health" (TUFH) elaborated by the World Health Organization (WHO). This model, used since 2001, has given rise to a large number of partnership networks covering the entire regions where minority Francophones live. In this model five key stakeholders in health are being involved: health professionals, communities, managers of health care institutions, educational institutions and governments. The Canadian Federal Government, in close collaboration with communities, directed the project through two non-for-profit agencies: the Sociéte Santé en Français (SSF) and the Consortium National de Formation en Santé (CNFS), sharing a common vision and aiming at improving access to health services and hence health status of minority Francophones. The networking following the TUFH model created a lot of opportunities as well as many challenges to overcome.
PubMed ID
18058694 View in PubMed
Less detail