Skip header and navigation

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124918
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leylâ Deger
Céline Plante
Louis Jacques
Sophie Goudreau
Stéphane Perron
John Hicks
Tom Kosatsky
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l' Agence de las sante services sociaux de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Infant
Male
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children's respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO(2) have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix.
To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO(2) from petroleum refineries located in Montreal's (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby.
The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO(2) exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO(2) exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child's age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home.
The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO(2) levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO(2). The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO(2) [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]).
Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO(2) and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries.
Notes
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Mar;123(3):632-819111332
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Sep 15;164(6):505-1716798793
Cites: Environ Health. 2009;8:4519781087
Cites: Pediatr Pulmonol. 2011 Jan;46(1):1-1720963782
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1999 Sep;14(3):669-7710543291
Cites: Allergy. 2000 Dec;55(12):1163-911117274
Cites: Environ Toxicol. 2001 Jun;16(3):269-7611409199
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Oct;74(8):574-811768046
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2003 Feb;24(2):160-912568822
Cites: Can Respir J. 2004 Jul-Aug;11(5):343-815332136
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1985 Aug;132(2):261-74026051
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1986 May;133(5):834-423706894
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1988 Jan-Feb;43(1):22-73355241
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1989 Mar;139(3):587-942923355
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1989 Mar;139(3):595-6002923356
Cites: Pediatr Pulmonol. 1991;11(2):127-331758730
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1993 Jan;147(1):118-248420404
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1993 Sep-Oct;48(5):328-358215597
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1993 Aug;47(4):282-68228762
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1994 Mar-Apr;49(2):111-88161240
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1994 Jun;48(3):237-478051521
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1994 Nov;150(5 Pt 1):1234-427952546
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Jan 15;141(2):111-227817967
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Sep;103 Suppl 6:49-538549489
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Mar 16;312(7032):661-58597731
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1996 May;104(5):500-58743437
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Sep 15;144(6):570-818797517
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Mar;155(3):1042-99116984
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Aug;156(2 Pt 1):546-529279238
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1998 Mar;11(3):677-859596121
Cites: Pediatr Pulmonol. 1998 May;25(5):299-3039635930
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1998 Dec;12(6):1354-619877490
Cites: Health Rep. 1998 Winter;10(3):9-21 (ENG); 9-22 (FRE)9926344
Cites: Lancet. 1999 Mar 13;353(9156):874-810093979
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 Jun 1;171(11):1272-815764722
Cites: Occup Med (Lond). 2005 Sep;55(6):425-3116140835
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Sep 13;173(6 Suppl):S12-416157728
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Oct;35(10):1279-8716238786
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Apr;117(4):653-919440507
PubMed ID
22536578 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between ambient fine particulate levels and disease activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140513
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Jan;119(1):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Sasha Bernatsky
Michel Fournier
Christian A Pineau
Ann E Clarke
Evelyne Vinet
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Jan;119(1):45-9
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Autoantibodies - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Kidney Diseases - epidemiology - immunology - metabolism
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - epidemiology - immunology - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - analysis
Quebec - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease of unclear etiology, characterized by an overactive immune system and the production of antibodies that may target normal tissues of many organ systems, including the kidneys. It can arise at any age and occurs mainly in women.
Our aim was to evaluate the potential influence of particulate matter (PM) air pollution on clinical aspects of SLE.
We studied a clinic cohort of SLE patients living on the island of Montreal, followed annually with a structured clinical assessment. We assessed the association between ambient levels of fine PM [median aerodynamic diameter = 2.5 µm (PM2.5)] measured at fixed-site monitoring stations and SLE disease activity measured with the SLE Disease Activity Index, version 2000 (SLEDAI-2K), which includes anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) serum-specific autoantibodies and renal tubule cellular casts in urine, which reflects serious renal inflammation. We used mixed effects regression models that we adjusted for daily ambient temperatures and ozone levels.
We assessed 237 patients (223 women) who together had 1,083 clinic visits from 2000 through 2007 (mean age at time of first visit, 41.2 years). PM2.5 levels were associated with anti-dsDNA and cellular casts. The crude and adjusted odds ratios (reflecting a 10-µg/m3 increase in PM2.5 averaged over the 48 hr prior to clinical assessment) were 1.26 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.96-1.65] and 1.34 (95% CI, 1.02-1.77) for anti-dsDNA antibodies and 1.43 (95% CI, 1.05-1.95) and 1.28 (0.92-1.80) for cellular casts. The total SLEDAI-2K scores were not associated with PM2.5 levels.
We provide novel data that suggest that short-term variations in air pollution may influence disease activity in established autoimmune rheumatic disease in humans. Our results add weight to concerns that pollution may be an important trigger of inflammation and autoimmunity.
Notes
Cites: Allergy. 1978 Feb;33(1):42-9306211
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2002 Feb;29(2):288-9111838846
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1997 Sep;40(9):17259324032
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2006 Apr;33(4):695-716583471
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2006 Nov;54(11):3623-3217075807
Cites: Lupus. 2006;15(11):728-3617153843
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2007 Oct;70(20):1731-4417885930
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2007 Dec;46(12):1814-818032538
Cites: Inhal Toxicol. 2008 Mar;20(5):499-50618368620
Cites: Clin Sci (Lond). 2008 Sep;115(6):175-8718691154
Cites: J Leukoc Biol. 2009 Aug;86(2):303-1219406832
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Jul;117(7):1065-919654914
Cites: J Asthma. 2009 Oct;46(8):777-8519863280
Cites: Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2009 Sep-Oct;27(5):877-8419917177
Cites: Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2000 Aug;23(2):182-710919984
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000 Sep;162(3 Pt 1):981-810988117
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Sep 1;164(5):826-3011549540
Cites: Circulation. 2002 Jan 29;105(4):411-411815420
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1982 Nov;25(11):1271-77138600
PubMed ID
20870568 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparative study of manganese and lead levels in human umbilical cords and maternal blood from two urban centers exposed to different gasoline additives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189600
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2002 May 6;290(1-3):157-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-6-2002
Author
Audrey Smargiassi
Larissa Takser
André Masse
Martin Sergerie
Donna Mergler
Geneviève St-Amour
Philippe Blot
Georgette Hellier
Guy Huel
Author Affiliation
CINBIOSE, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. c3604@nobel.si.uqam.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2002 May 6;290(1-3):157-64
Date
May-6-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Carcinogens, Environmental - chemistry
Female
Gasoline
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lead - blood
Male
Manganese - blood
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Organometallic Compounds - chemistry
Paris
Pregnancy
Quebec
Umbilical Cord - chemistry
Urban Population
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
Manganese (Mn) and lead (Pb) are two neurotoxic chemicals and experimental evidence suggests that they can cross the placental barrier. Tetraethyl lead was still in use as an antiknock agent in Paris during the sampling period of the study, while it has been replaced by methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) in Canada since 1977. By 1990, MMT was in 100% of gasoline in Canada. In a study of 160 pairs of mothers-neonates in Montreal and 206 pairs in Paris, we compared levels of Mn and Pb in the umbilical cord and in maternal blood. Neonates and mothers had significantly higher Pb levels in Paris where lead additives were still used in gasoline. Geometric mean maternal blood Pb levels were 5.4 microg/dl compared to 2.1 microg/dl in Montreal and cord blood Pb levels were 3.2 microg/dl in Parisian mothers compared to 1.7 microg/dl in Montreal. The prevalence of Paris Pb values superior to the 95th percentile of the Montreal distribution was highly elevated in all media studied. The prevalence of high Mn levels in umbilical cord blood was also significantly higher in Montreal. Surveillance programs are important to limit Pb overexposure and associated neurological effects in neonates where tetraethyl Pb is still in use as a gasoline additive. Since Mn is an essential element and dietary Mn intake may differ between Montreal and Paris, the difference observed with regard to high Mn values between Montreal and Paris cannot, at this time, be attributed to MMT in Montreal's gasoline. Further studies are needed to infer an association between Mn emissions from MMT and prenatal exposure to Mn.
Notes
Erratum In: Sci Total Environ. 2002 Dec 2;300(1-3):247
PubMed ID
12083707 View in PubMed
Less detail

Home environmental factors associated with poor asthma control in Montreal children: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142755
Source
J Asthma. 2010 Jun;47(5):513-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Leylâ Deger
Céline Plante
Sophie Goudreau
Audrey Smargiassi
Stéphane Perron
Robert L Thivierge
Louis Jacques
Author Affiliation
Département de santé environnementale et santé au travail, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.
Source
J Asthma. 2010 Jun;47(5):513-20
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prognosis
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
Home environmental exposures may aggravate asthma. Few population-based studies have investigated the relationship between asthma control in children and home environmental exposures.
Identify home environmental exposures associated with poor control of asthma among asthmatic children less than 12 years of age in Montreal (Quebec, Canada).
This cross-sectional population-based study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children aged 6 months to 12 years conducted in 2006 (n = 7980). Asthma control was assessed (n = 980) using an adaptation of the Canadian asthma consensus report clinical parameters. Using log-binomial regression models, prevalence ratios (PRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated to explore the relationship between inadequate control of asthma and environmental home exposures, including allergens, irritants, mold, and dampness indicators. Subjects with acceptable asthma control were compared with those with inadequate disease control.
Of 980 children with active asthma in the year prior to the survey, 36% met at least one of the five criteria as to poor control of their disease. The population's characteristics found to be related with a lack of asthma control were younger age, history of parental atopy, low maternal education level, foreign-born mothers, and tenant occupancy. After adjustments, children living along high-traffic density streets (PR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.00-1.81) and those with their bedroom or residence at the basement level (PR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.01-1.66) were found to be at increased risk of poor asthma control.
Suboptimal asthma control appears to be mostly associated with traffic, along with mold and moisture conditions, the latter being a more frequent exposure and therefore having a greater public health impact.
PubMed ID
20560826 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk assessment of aircraft noise on sleep in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114376
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jul-Aug;103(4):e293-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Louis-Francois Tétreault
Céline Plante
Stéphane Perron
Sophie Goudreau
Norman King
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Département de santé environnementale et santé au travail, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jul-Aug;103(4):e293-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Airports
Canada
Humans
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Sleep - physiology
Wakefulness
Abstract
Estimate the number of awakenings additional to spontaneous awakenings, induced by the nighttime aircraft movements at an international airport in Montreal, in the population residing nearby in 2009.
Maximum sound levels (LAS,max) were derived from aircraft movements using the Integrated Noise Model 7.0b, on a 28 x 28 km grid centred on the airport and with a 0.1 x 0.1 km resolution. Outdoor LAS,max were converted to indoor LAS,max by reducing noise levels by 15 dB(A) or 21 dB(A). For all grid points, LAS,max were transformed into probabilities of additional awakening using a function developed by Basner et al. (2006). The probabilities of additional awakening were linked to estimated numbers of exposed residents for each grid location to assess the number of aircraft-noise-induced awakenings in Montreal.
Using a 15 dB(A) sound attenuation, 590 persons would, on average, have one or more additional awakenings per night for the year 2009. In the scenario using a 21 dB(A) sound attenuation, on average, no one would be subjected to one or more additional awakenings per night due to aircraft noise.
Using the 2009 flight patterns, our data suggest that a small number of Montreal residents are exposed to noise levels that could induce one or more awakenings additional to spontaneous awakenings per night.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2013 May-Jun;104(3):e27523823900
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2013 May-Jun;104(3):e27623823901
PubMed ID
23618644 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk of asthmatic episodes in children exposed to sulfur dioxide stack emissions from a refinery point source in Montreal, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150980
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Apr;117(4):653-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Audrey Smargiassi
Tom Kosatsky
John Hicks
Céline Plante
Ben Armstrong
Paul J Villeneuve
Sophie Goudreau
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Département de santé environnementale et santé au travail, Montréal, Québec, Canada. asmargia@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Apr;117(4):653-9
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - pharmacology
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Extraction and Processing Industry
Humans
Inhalation Exposure
Models, Chemical
Petroleum
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis - pharmacology
Abstract
Little is known about the respiratory effects of short-term exposures to petroleum refinery emissions in young children. This study is an extension of an ecologic study that found an increased rate of hospitalizations for respiratory conditions among children living near petroleum refineries in Montreal (Canada).
We used a time-stratified case-crossover design to assess the risk of asthma episodes in relation to short-term variations in sulfur dioxide levels among children 2-4 years of age living within 0.5-7.5 km of the refinery stacks. Health data used to measure asthma episodes included emergency department (ED) visits and hospital admissions from 1996 to 2004. We estimated daily levels of SO2 at the residence of children using a) two fixed-site SO2 monitors located near the refineries and b) the AERMOD (American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model) atmospheric dispersion model. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios associated with an increase in the interquartile range of daily SO2 mean and peak exposures (31.2 ppb for AERMOD peaks). We adjusted for temperature, relative humidity, and regional/urban background air pollutant levels.
The risks of asthma ED visits and hospitalizations were more pronounced for same-day (lag 0) SO2 peak levels than for mean levels on the same day, or for other lags: the adjusted odds ratios estimated for same-day SO2 peak levels from AERMOD were 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00-1.22] and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.10-1.82), over the interquartile range, for ED visits and hospital admissions, respectively.
Short-term episodes of increased SO2 exposures from refinery stack emissions were associated with a higher number of asthma episodes in nearby children.
Notes
Cites: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2001 Apr;86(4):456-6011345292
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1989 Feb;79:73-822785034
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2001 Aug;35(4):214-2211477012
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2001 Jun;17(6):1143-5011491157
Cites: Epidemiology. 2002 Jul;13(4):481-412094105
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2003 Aug;60(8):e212883029
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Oct;32(5):854-6114559764
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Jan 15;133(2):144-531985444
Cites: Pediatr Pulmonol. 1991;11(2):134-401758731
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1994 Mar-Apr;49(2):111-88161240
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1996 Jan;153(1):3-508542133
Cites: Thorax. 1997 Sep;52(9):760-59371204
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1998 Dec;55(12):812-229924442
Cites: Thorax. 1999 Jul;54(7):597-60510377204
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Mar;113(3):290-615743717
Cites: Pediatrics. 2005 Aug;116(2):e235-4016061576
Cites: Epidemiology. 2005 Nov;16(6):717-2616222160
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Sep 15;164(6):505-1716798793
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2006 Sep;36(9):1138-4616961713
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2007 Sep;37(9):1312-917845411
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2008;71(1):81-518080898
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2008;71(3):238-4318097949
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008 Mar;121(3):607-1318328890
Cites: Can Respir J. 2008 May-Jun;15(4):188-9218551199
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2001 Apr;31(4):565-911359423
PubMed ID
19440507 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk of childhood asthma prevalence attributable to residential proximity to major roads in Montreal, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124973
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Mar-Apr;103(2):113-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Karine Price
Celine Plante
Sophie Goudreau
Elena Isabel Pascua Boldo
Stéphane Perron
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de I'Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, Montreal, QC. kprice@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Mar-Apr;103(2):113-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Prevalence
Public Health
Quebec - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vehicle Emissions - analysis
Abstract
Exposure to traffic-related air pollutants plays a role in several health outcomes. A large body of evidence tends to link asthma in children with traffic exposure. Increasing asthma prevalence and incidence in children in Canadian cities has been of concern for public health authorities. The following study focuses on estimating the risk of asthma prevalence attributable to residing in proximity to major roads on the Island of Montreal, Canada.
Risk functions pertaining to asthma in children and residential proximity to major roads were selected from the literature and applied to Montreal. Asthma prevalence was taken from population-based studies. Population data were retrieved from Canadian census. Exposure was estimated using the proximity to major road and highway category of the Desktop Mapping Technologies Inc. database (DMTI Spatial Inc.).
Based on different studies, the percentage of prevalent asthma cases attributable to residing within 50 metres of a major road or highway for children aged 2, 4 and 6 years varied between 2.4% (0-4.3), 5.6% (0.1-8.6) and 5.9% (0.1-9.0). For the 5-7 year age group residing within 75 m of a major road or highway, the percent of cases was 6.4% (2.6-9.3). For children aged 8 to 10 residing within 75 m of a highway only, the percent of cases was 0.7% (0.2-0.9).
These numbers represent the best crude estimates and are an indication of a possible range of cases linked to residential proximity to major roads. As there are uncertainties linked to the application of exposure-response functions, these estimates will be reassessed as new evidence is gathered through further research.
PubMed ID
22530532 View in PubMed
Less detail

Small-scale spatial variability of particle concentrations and traffic levels in Montreal: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176151
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Feb 15;338(3):243-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2005
Author
Audrey Smargiassi
Mary Baldwin
Charles Pilger
Rose Dugandzic
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
Montreal Department of Public Health, Canada. asmargia@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Feb 15;338(3):243-51
Date
Feb-15-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Air Pollutants - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Filtration
Humans
Particle Size
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Vehicle Emissions - analysis
Abstract
Little is known about the particulate exposure of populations living along major urban roads. The objective of this pilot study was to explore the small-scale spatial and temporal variability of the absorption coefficient of PM2.5 filters, as a surrogate for elemental carbon, in relation to levels of PM2.5, at residential sites with varying traffic densities in a large Canadian city. Concurrent 24-h measurements were performed at four residential sites during 7 weeks. A gradient existed across all four sites for the absorption coefficient of the filters (and NO2 levels). In contrast, the levels of PM2.5 were quite similar at all sites. The difference in the filter absorption coefficient of PM2.5 filters, between an urban background and a residential traffic site (with about 30000 vehicles/day), expressed as a percentage of the background site, was 40%. These results indicate that spatial variability in PM2.5 absorption coefficient can be observed with traffic intensity on a small scale within a North American city and suggests that regression modelling approaches similar to those used in European studies could be used to estimate exposure of the general population to traffic-related particles on a local scale in North America.
PubMed ID
15713332 View in PubMed
Less detail

Socio-economic correlates of municipal-level pollution emissions on Montreal Island.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164078
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Mar-Apr;98(2):138-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Stéphanie Premji
Frédéric Bertrand
Audrey Smargiassi
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire sur la biologie, la santé, la société et l'environnement, Institut des sciences de l'environnement, Université du Québec a Montréal, Montréal, Québec. stephanie.premji@internet.uqam.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Mar-Apr;98(2):138-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Demography
Emigration and Immigration
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Industry - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Differential exposure to environmental hazards is one component of the social gradient in health. Few studies have investigated the association between socioeconomic characteristics and environmental hazards in a Canadian context. We assessed the relationships between pollution emissions and socio-economic characteristics for 27 municipalities on Montreal Island.
Pollution emissions were determined using Environment Canada's National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) for the periods 1995-1996 and 2000-2001. Variables included the number of reporting industries, the average annual releases, and the average annual releases density. These data were cross-referenced with socio-economic data from the 1996 and 2001 Canadian Censuses, respectively.
For both periods, pollution measures were inversely related to the average monthly amount of owners' major payments, the average income of households, the proportion of workers in the tertiary sector, and the proportion of individuals with a university education. Pollution measures were positively associated with the unemployment rate, the proportion of workers in the secondary sector, and the proportion of individuals with less than high school education.
Socio-economic characteristics are associated with municipal-level pollution emissions on Montreal Island. Whether higher emissions are indicative of higher pollution exposure requires further investigation.
PubMed ID
17441539 View in PubMed
Less detail

Traffic intensity, dwelling value, and hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly in Montreal (Canada): a case-control analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169280
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Jun;60(6):507-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Audrey Smargiassi
Khalid Berrada
Isabel Fortier
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique, 1301 Sherbrooke East, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2L 1M3. asmargia@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Jun;60(6):507-12
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
Persons exposed to residential traffic have increased rates of respiratory morbidity and mortality. As poverty is an important determinant of ill health, some have argued that these associations may relate to the lower socioeconomic status of those living along major roads.
The objective was to evaluate the association between traffic intensity at home and hospital admissions for respiratory disease among Montreal residents of 60 years and older.
Case hospitalisations were those with respiratory diagnoses and control hospitalisations were those where the primary discharge diagnosis was non-respiratory. Morning peak traffic estimates from the EMME/2 Montreal traffic model (MOTREM98) were used as an indicator of exposure to road traffic outside the homes of those hospitalised. The crude association between traffic intensity and hospitalisation for respiratory disease was adjusted by an area based estimate of the appraised value of patients' residences, expressed as a dollar average over a small segment of road (lodging value). This indicator of socioeconomic status, as calculated from the Montreal property assessment database, is available at a finer geographical scale than the neighbourhood socioeconomic indicators accessible from the Canadian census.
Increased odds of being hospitalised for a respiratory compared with a control diagnosis were associated with higher levels of estimated road traffic nearby patients' homes, even after adjustment for lodging value (crude OR 1.35, CI95% 1.22 to 1.49; adjusted OR 1.18, CI95% 1.06 to 1.31 for >3160 vehicles passing during the three hour morning traffic peak compared with secondary roads off network).
The results suggest that road traffic intensity itself, may affect the respiratory health of elderly residents of a large Canadian city, an association that is not solely a reflection of socioeconomic status.
Notes
Cites: Thorax. 1999 Dec;54(12):1070-410567625
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2000 Mar;57(3):152-810810096
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2002 Mar;110(3):293-30011882481
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2002 Aug;110 Suppl 4:573-8912194890
Cites: J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2002 Sep;52(9):1032-4212269664
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Oct 19;360(9341):1203-912401246
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2005 Feb 15;338(3):243-5115713332
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Sep;111(12):1512-812948892
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Mar 16;312(7032):676-78597735
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1996 Apr;53(4):241-78664961
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Oct;105(10):1078-839349825
Cites: Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2004 Dec;8(12):1423-815636487
Cites: Epidemiology. 2003 Mar;14(2):228-3912606891
PubMed ID
16698981 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.