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Spatial variability of mercury and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the European perch (Perca fluviatilis) - Implications for risk-benefit analyses of fish consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280363
Source
Environ Pollut. 2016 Dec;219:305-314
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Ursula Strandberg
Marjo Palviainen
Aslak Eronen
Sirpa Piirainen
Ari Laurén
Jarkko Akkanen
Paula Kankaala
Source
Environ Pollut. 2016 Dec;219:305-314
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Finland
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Lakes - chemistry
Mercury - analysis
Perches
Risk assessment
Selenium - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
This study evaluated the spatial variability of risks and benefits of consuming fish from humic and clear lakes. Mercury in fish is a potential risk for human health, but risk assessment may be confounded by selenium, which has been suggested to counterbalance mercury toxicity. In addition to the risks, fish are also rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which are known to be beneficial for cardiovascular health and brain cognitive function in humans. We found that the concentrations of EPA + DHA and mercury in European perch (Perca fluviatilis) vary spatially and are connected with lake water chemistry and catchment characteristics. The highest mercury concentrations and the lowest EPA + DHA concentrations were found in perch from humic lakes with high proportion of peatland (30-50%) in the catchment. In addition, the ratio of selenium to mercury in perch muscle was =1 suggesting that selenium may counterbalance mercury toxicity. The observed variation in mercury and EPA + DHA content in perch from different lakes indicate that the risks and benefits of fish consumption vary spatially, and are connected with lake water chemistry and catchment characteristics. In general, consumption of perch from humic lakes exposed humans to greater risks (higher concentrations of mercury), but provided less benefits (lower concentrations of EPA + DHA) than consumption of perch from clear lakes.
PubMed ID
27814547 View in PubMed
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