Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Endoscopic transpapillary stenting for pancreatic fistulas after necrosectomy with necrotizing pancreatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264301
Source
Surg Endosc. 2015 Jan;29(1):108-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Heikki Karjula
Arto Saarela
Anne Vaarala
Jarmo Niemelä
Jyrki Mäkelä
Source
Surg Endosc. 2015 Jan;29(1):108-12
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde
Feasibility Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreas - surgery
Pancreatic Fistula - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing - surgery
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Stents
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Data concerning the incidence and treatment of pancreatic fistula after necrosectomy in severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis (SAP) are scarce. Our aim was to assess the incidence of pancreatic fistula, and the feasibility and results of endoscopic transpapillary stenting (ETS) in patients with SAP after necrosectomy.
From January 2009 to December 2012 twenty-nine consecutive patients with SAP and necrosectomy in Oulu University Hospital were enrolled into this study. Five patients died before ETS because of the rapid progress of the disease and were, therefore, excluded.
ERP was performed for the remaining 24 patients demonstrating fistula in 22/24 patients (92 %). ETS was successful in 23 patients and the fistula closed in all of them after a median of 82 (2-210) days with acceptable morbidity and no procedure-related mortality.
All patients after necrosectomy for SAP seem to have internal or external pancreatic fistula. EST aimed at internal drainage of the necrosectomy cavity is a feasible and effective therapy in these patients.
PubMed ID
24942784 View in PubMed
Less detail

How to cannulate? A survey of the Scandinavian Association for Digestive Endoscopy (SADE) in 141 endoscopists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125144
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jul;47(7):861-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
J-Matthias Löhr
Lars Aabaken
Urban Arnelo
Juha Grönroos
Jorma Halttunen
Truls Hauge
Eduard Jonas
Per M Kleveland
Palle Nordblad Schmidt
Fredrik Swahn
Arto Saarela
Ervin Toth
Søren Meisner
Author Affiliation
Gastrocentrum Kirurgi, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden. matthias.lohr@ki.se
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jul;47(7):861-9
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bile Ducts
Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde - instrumentation - methods
Clinical Competence
Gastroenterology
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Scandinavia
Abstract
Cannulation of the papilla vateri represents an enigmatic first step in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP). In light of falling numbers of (diagnostic) ERCP and novel techniques, e.g. short-wire system, we were interested in the approach novice and experienced endoscopist are taking; especially, what makes a papilla difficult to cannulate and how to approach this. We devised a structured online questionnaire, sent to all endoscopists registered with SADE, the Scandinavian Association for Digestive Endoscopy. A total of 141 responded. Of those, 49 were experienced ERCP-endoscopists (>900 ERCPs). The first choice of cannulation is with a sphincterotome and a preinserted wire. Both less experienced and more experienced endoscopists agreed on the criteria to describe a papilla difficult to cannulate and both would choose the needle-knife sphincterotomy (NKS) to get access to the bile duct. The less experienced used more "upward" NKS, whereas the more experienced also used the "downward" NKS technique. This survey provides us with a database allowing now for a more differentiated view on cannulation techniques, success, and outcome in terms of pancreatitis.
PubMed ID
22512404 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-Term Outcome and Causes of Death for Working-Age Patients Hospitalized Due to Acute Pancreatitis With a Median Follow-Up of 10 Years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287456
Source
Ann Surg. 2017 Dec 04;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-04-2017
Author
Heikki Karjula
Arto Saarela
Pasi Ohtonen
Tero Ala-Kokko
Jyrki Mäkelä
Janne H Liisanantti
Source
Ann Surg. 2017 Dec 04;
Date
Dec-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To examine long-term survival and causes of death among working-age patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) compared with the normal population.
Few studies have investigated long-term survival after AP and recurrent AP compared with the normal population; moreover, results from those studies are difficult to compare, due to suboptimal control populations and wide variations in follow-up times.
This retrospective, registry-based study included 1644 patients with AP, aged 18 to 64 years, admitted to Oulu University Hospital in 1995 to 2012. Patient data were compared with data from 8220 age- and sex-matched controls that resided in the hospital district area.
Alcohol was the main etiologic factor causing 71.4% of the cases. During the median follow-up time of 9.5 years, mortality was 24.2% in the study group and 6.3% in the control group (P
PubMed ID
29206674 View in PubMed
Less detail