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Arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury levels in blood of Finnish adults and their relation to diet, lifestyle habits and sociodemographic variables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281701
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jan;24(2):1347-1362
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Khaled Abass
Markku Koiranen
Darja Mazej
Janja Snoj Tratnik
Milena Horvat
Jukka Hakkola
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Arja Rautio
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jan;24(2):1347-1362
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arsenic - blood
Cadmium - blood
Diet
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland
Habits
Humans
Lead - blood
Life Style
Male
Mercury - blood
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Selenium - blood
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The Northern Finland Birth Cohort program (NFBC) is the epidemiological and longitudinal prospective general population research program, which was established to promote health and wellbeing of the population in northern Finland. The aim of present study, as a part of the NFBC program, was to analyze the blood levels of arsenic (B-As), cadmium (B-Cd), lead (B-Pb), total mercury (B-Hg) and selenium (B-Se); to compare these levels with threshold limits; to study sociodemographic factors; and to correlate these levels with calcium and haemoglobin. The study was comprised of 249 NFBC subjects, of which 123 were female and 126 were male (ages 31.1???0.3 and 31.1???0.4, respectively). All participants were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding diet and living habits. The geometric means (? SD) of B-As were 0.49???2.80??g/l and 0.44???2.72??g/l; B-Cd were 0.18???4.02??g/l and 0.12???3.21??g/l; B-Pb were 17.0???1.8??g/l and 9.06???2.20??g/l; B-Hg were 2.18???2.02??g/l and 1.85???1.78??g/l; and B-Se were 106.0???1.3 and 94.3???1.3??g/l in males and females, respectively. Among the subjects in the present analysis, 23?% of males and 17.1?% of females had B-As levels above the ATSDR normal human levels of B-As in unexposed individuals (1.0??g/l). The B-Pb geometric mean (12.44??g/l) was approximately one eighth the CDC toxicological cut-off point of 100??g/l. Twenty-one individuals (8.4?%) exceeded a B-Hg level of 5.8??g/l. Fifty-eight females (47?%) had a B-Hg higher than 2.0??g/l, the German Federal Environmental Agency cut-off point for women (18-69?years) who consume fish at least three times/month; therefore, their babies could be at risk of adverse effects during development.
PubMed ID
27778267 View in PubMed
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The association between blood copper concentration and biomarkers related to cardiovascular disease risk - analysis of 206 individuals in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296037
Source
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2019 Jan; 51:12-18
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Saranya Palaniswamy
Terhi Piltonen
Markku Koiranen
Darja Mazej
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Khaled Abass
Arja Rautio
Sylvain Sebert
Author Affiliation
Center For Life Course Health Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland; Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: saranya.palaniswamy@oulu.fi.
Source
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2019 Jan; 51:12-18
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Copper is an abundant trace element in humans where alterations in the circulating concentration could inform on chronic disease aetiology. To date, data are lacking to study how copper may associate with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in young and healthy population. Molecular evidence suggests an important role of copper in liver metabolism, an essential organ in maintaining cardiovascular health and inflammation, therefore supporting copper as an associated biomarker of the risk.
We performed a cross-sectional analysis to examine the possible associations between blood copper levels and risk factors for CVD and pre-inflammatory process.
The data has been collected from a sub-sample set of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (NFBC1966) at 31 years.
The study included 206 individuals, 116 men and 90 women. To reduce environmental individual variations affecting both copper and the metabolic profile in the study sample, the participants were selected as: i) being born in Finnish Lapland and ii) living in their birth place for the last five years preceding blood sampling.
Fasting blood copper concentration was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The CVD risk factors included 6 metabolic clusters (30 cardiovascular and pro-inflammatory factors) assessed by nuclear magnetic resonance. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to test the linear association between blood copper and 6 metabolic clusters for CVD risk. Associations were assessed under correction for multiple testing.
Copper (Cu) levels were comparable in men and women, with no difference between sexes (p-value
PubMed ID
30466920 View in PubMed
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The association between blood copper concentration and biomarkers related to cardiovascular disease risk - analysis of 206 individuals in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298347
Source
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2019 Jan; 51:12-18
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Saranya Palaniswamy
Terhi Piltonen
Markku Koiranen
Darja Mazej
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Khaled Abass
Arja Rautio
Sylvain Sebert
Author Affiliation
Center For Life Course Health Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland; Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: saranya.palaniswamy@oulu.fi.
Source
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2019 Jan; 51:12-18
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Biomarkers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Copper - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
Inflammation - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
Copper is an abundant trace element in humans where alterations in the circulating concentration could inform on chronic disease aetiology. To date, data are lacking to study how copper may associate with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in young and healthy population. Molecular evidence suggests an important role of copper in liver metabolism, an essential organ in maintaining cardiovascular health and inflammation, therefore supporting copper as an associated biomarker of the risk.
We performed a cross-sectional analysis to examine the possible associations between blood copper levels and risk factors for CVD and pre-inflammatory process.
The data has been collected from a sub-sample set of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (NFBC1966) at 31 years.
The study included 206 individuals, 116 men and 90 women. To reduce environmental individual variations affecting both copper and the metabolic profile in the study sample, the participants were selected as: i) being born in Finnish Lapland and ii) living in their birth place for the last five years preceding blood sampling.
Fasting blood copper concentration was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The CVD risk factors included 6 metabolic clusters (30 cardiovascular and pro-inflammatory factors) assessed by nuclear magnetic resonance. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to test the linear association between blood copper and 6 metabolic clusters for CVD risk. Associations were assessed under correction for multiple testing.
Copper (Cu) levels were comparable in men and women, with no difference between sexes (p-value
PubMed ID
30466920 View in PubMed
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Associations of deliberate self-harm with loneliness, self-rated health and life satisfaction in adolescence: Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107715
Source
Pages 162-168 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):162-168
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Anna Reetta Rönkä
Anja Taanila
Markku Koiranen
Vappu Sunnari
Arja Rautio
Author Affiliation
Women's and Gender Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Oulu, Finland. anna.r.ronka@oulu.fi
Source
Pages 162-168 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):162-168
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Sex Factors
Abstract
Deliberate self-harm (DSH) is an act with a non-fatal outcome in which an individual initiates a behavior, such as self-cutting or burning, with the intention of inflicting harm on his or her self. Interpersonal difficulties have been shown to be a risk factor for DSH, but the association between subjective experience of loneliness and DSH have rarely been examined.
To examine the frequency of DSH or its ideation and loneliness among 16-year-olds to determine if associations exist between DSH and loneliness, loneliness-related factors, self-rated health and satisfaction with life.
The study population (n = 7,014) was taken from Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (N = 9,432). Cross-tabulations were used to describe the frequency of DSH by factors selected by gender. Logistic regression analysis was used to describe the association between DSH and loneliness and other selected factors.
Nearly 8.7% (n = 608) of adolescents reported DSH often/sometimes during the preceding 6 months, with girls (n = 488, 13.4%) reporting DSH almost 4 times than that of boys (n = 120, 3.6%). Nearly 3.2% of the adolescents (girls: n = 149, 4.1%; boys: n = 72, 2.2%) expressed that the statement I feel lonely was very/often true, and 26.4% (girls: n = 1,265, 34.8%; boys: n = 585, 17.4%) expressed that the statement was somewhat/sometimes true. Logistic regression showed that those who reported to be very/often lonely (girls: odds ratio (OR) 4.1; boys: OR 3.2), somewhat/sometimes lonely (girls: OR 2.4; boys: OR 2.4) were dissatisfied with life (girls: OR 3.3; boys: OR 3.3), felt unliked (girls: OR 2.2; boys: OR 6.0) and had moderate self-rated health (girls: OR 2.0; boys: OR 1.7), were more likely to report DSH than those without these feelings.
The results show that loneliness is associated with DSH, and that loneliness should be considered as a risk for individual health and well-being.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984286 View in PubMed
Documents
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Body mass index and overweight in relation to residence distance and population density: experience from the Northern Finland birth cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265839
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:938
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Simo Näyhä
Tiina Lankila
Arja Rautio
Markku Koiranen
Tuija H Tammelin
Anja Taanila
Jarmo Rusanen
Jaana Laitinen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:938
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Body mass index
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Overweight - epidemiology
Population Density
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
The effect of urban sprawl on body weight in Finland is not well known. To provide more information, we examined whether body mass index (BMI) and the prevalence of overweight are associated with an individual's distance to the local community centre and population density in his/her resident area.
The sample consisted of 5363 men and women, members of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (NFBC), who filled in a postal questionnaire and attended a medical checkup in 1997, at the age of 31 years. Body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)) and the prevalence of overweight (BMI = 25.0 kg/m(2)) were regressed on each subject's road distance to the resident commune's centre and on population density in the 1 km(2) geographical grid in which he/she resided, using a generalized additive model. Adjustments were made for sex, marital status, occupational class, education, leisure-time and occupational physical activity, alcohol consumption and smoking.
The mean BMI among the subjects was 24.7 kg/m(2), but it increased by increasing road distance (by 1.3 kg/m(2) from 5-10 to 20-184 km) and by decreasing population density (by 1.7 kg/m(2) from 1000-19,192 to 1-5 inhabitants/km(2)). The respective increases in overweight (overall prevalence 41%) were 13 per cent units for distance and 14 per cent units for population density. Adjusted regressions based on continuous explanatory variables showed an inverse L-shaped pattern with a mean BMI of 24.6 kg/m(2) at distances shorter than 5 km and a rise of 2.6 kg/m(2) at longer distances, and an increase of 2.5 kg/m(2) from highest to lowest population density. The associations with road distance were stronger for women than men, while the sex difference in association with population density remained indeterminate.
We conclude that young adults in Northern Finland who live far away from local centres or in the most sparsely populated areas are fatter than those who live close to local centres or in densely populated areas. The likely explanations include variations in everyday physical activity in different residential environments, although causality of the associations remains to be confirmed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24103455 View in PubMed
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Climate Change Impacts on Environmental and Human Exposure to Mercury in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261509
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015;12(4):3579-3599
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kyrre Sundseth
Jozef M Pacyna
Anna Banel
Elisabeth G Pacyna
Arja Rautio
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015;12(4):3579-3599
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This paper reviews information from the literature and the EU ArcRisk project to assess whether climate change results in an increase or decrease in exposure to mercury (Hg) in the Arctic, and if this in turn will impact the risks related to its harmful effects. It presents the state-of-the art of knowledge on atmospheric mercury emissions from anthropogenic sources worldwide, the long-range transport to the Arctic, and it discusses the likely environmental fate and exposure effects on population groups in the Arctic under climate change conditions. The paper also includes information about the likely synergy effects (co-benefits) current and new climate change polices and mitigation options might have on mercury emissions reductions in the future. The review concludes that reductions of mercury emission from anthropogenic sources worldwide would need to be introduced as soon as possible in order to assure lowering the adverse impact of climate change on human health. Scientific information currently available, however, is not in the position to clearly answer whether climate change will increase or decrease the risk of exposure to mercury in the Arctic. New research should therefore be undertaken to model the relationships between climate change and mercury exposure.
PubMed ID
25837201 View in PubMed
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Correction to: Temporal trends of contaminants in Arctic human populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300259
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 May 25; :
Publication Type
Published Erratum
Date
May-25-2019
Author
Khaled Abass
Anastasia Emelyanova
Arja Rautio
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland. khaled.megahed@oulu.fi.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 May 25; :
Date
May-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Published Erratum
Abstract
The article Temporal trends of contaminants in Arctic human populations, written by Khaled Abass, Anastasia Emelyanova and Arja Rautio, was originally published electronically on the publisher's internet portal (currently SpringerLink) on 25 August 2018 without open access.
Notes
ErratumFor: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Oct;25(29):28834-28850 PMID 30145756
PubMed ID
31127525 View in PubMed
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Diabetes and elimination of antipyrine in man: an analysis of 298 patients classified by type of diabetes, age, sex, duration of disease and liver involvement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47532
Source
Pharmacol Toxicol. 2002 Mar;90(3):155-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Eero A Sotaniemi
Olavi Pelkonen
Arno J Arranto
Päivi Tapanainen
Arja Rautio
Markku Pasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Pharmacol Toxicol. 2002 Mar;90(3):155-60
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - pharmacokinetics
Antipyrine - pharmacokinetics - urine
Blood Glucose - analysis - drug effects
Comparative Study
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - metabolism
Female
Humans
Insulin - administration & dosage
Liver - metabolism - physiopathology
Male
Metabolic Clearance Rate
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Effects of diabetes on hepatic drug metabolism in man has not yet been adequately clarified. Two hundred ninety-eight diabetic patients, classified by type of the disease, age, gender, duration of therapy and liver involvement, were investigated. The antipyrine plasma clearance rate and cytochrome P450 content determinations in liver biopsies of subjects with diagnostic liver biopsy were used as indices of hepatic drug metabolising capacity. Drug metabolism was reduced as a function of age. Antipyrine elimination rate was dependent on the type of diabetes (type 1 versus type 2) and gender. Untreated type 1 patients eliminated antipyrine rapidly and insulin treatment normalised antipyrine elimination (clearance rates 89.5 +/- 20.3 versus 58.8 +/- 17.2 ml/min.; P
PubMed ID
12071338 View in PubMed
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Different Risk Factors Between Disruptive Behavior Disorders and ADHD in Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291093
Source
J Atten Disord. 2017 Sep; 21(11):904-912
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Tanja Nordström
Tuula Hurtig
Alina Rodriguez
Jukka Savolainen
Arja Rautio
Irma Moilanen
Anja Taanila
Hanna Ebeling
Author Affiliation
1 Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Atten Disord. 2017 Sep; 21(11):904-912
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hyperkinesis - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Problem Behavior - psychology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
To examine different risk factors between disruptive behavior disorders (DBD) and ADHD or combined DBD and ADHD.
The study population was derived from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. Psychiatric diagnoses were defined from the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL) interview. The study sample was divided into four groups-people with DBD ( n = 44), with ADHD ( n = 91), with both ( n = 72), and without either ( n = 250)-to evaluate the different risk factors behind these disorders.
After adjusting with possible confounding factors, female gender and paternal admittance to inpatient psychiatric care increased the odds that an adolescent was having DBD. Childhood hyperactivity symptoms increased the odds of having ADHD and childhood hyperactivity symptoms and scholastic impairment increased the odds of having both disorders.
Our study indicates DBD and ADHD have clearly different risk factors, and the impact of the paternal factors on DBD should be noted more than has been before.
PubMed ID
25001369 View in PubMed
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Estimation of health risk by using toxicokinetic modelling: a case study of polychlorinated biphenyl PCB153.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108259
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2013 Oct 15;261:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2013
Author
Khaled Abass
Antti Huusko
Pentti Nieminen
Päivi Myllynen
Olavi Pelkonen
Kirsi Vahakangas
Arja Rautio
Author Affiliation
Centre for Arctic Medicine, Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: khaled.megahed@oulu.fi.
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2013 Oct 15;261:1-10
Date
Oct-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Environmental monitoring
Female
Greenland
Humans
Lipid Metabolism
Lipids - blood
Middle Aged
Milk, Human - metabolism
Models, Biological
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Pregnancy
Risk assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess potential PCB153-associated human health effects and risks, it is necessary to model past exposure. PCB153 blood concentrations, obtained from the AMAP biomonitoring programme, in Inuit women covering the years 1994-2006 at Disko Bay, 1999-2005 at Nuuk, and 1992-2007 at Nunavik were used to extrapolate body burden and exposure to the whole lifespan of the population by the one-compartment toxicokinetic model. By using risk characterisation modelling, calculated Hazard Quotients were higher than 1 between the years 1955 and 1987 for the 90th population percentile and during 1956-1984 for the 50th population percentile. Cancer risk for overall exposure of PCB153 ranged from 4.6×10(-5) to 1.8×10(-6) for the 90th percentile and 3.6×10(-5) to 1.4×10(-10) for the 50th percentile between 1930 and 2049, when central estimates or upper-bound slope factors were applied. Cancer risk was below 1×10(-6) for the same time period when a lower slope factor was applied. Significant future research requirements to improve health risk characterisation include, among others, larger sample sizes, better analytical accuracy, fewer assumptions in exposure assessment, and consequently, a better choice of the toxicity benchmark used to develop the hazard quotient.
PubMed ID
23911823 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.