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Organization of nursing care and stressful work characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184721
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2003 Jul;43(2):197-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Arja Mäkinen
Mika Kivimäki
Marko Elovainio
Marianna Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Division of Applied Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. arja.makinen@satshp.fi
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2003 Jul;43(2):197-205
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Regression Analysis
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Abstract
Occupational stress is assumed to arise from social arrangements that are partially determined by the modes of organization of work. However, there is little systematic research on the extent to which modes of organizing nursing work are related to stressful characteristics of work.
This study explored the relationship between modes of organizing nursing and stress.
Survey responses on modes of organization of nursing were collected from 27 ward sisters and those on stressful work characteristics from 568 nurses working in 27 wards with different nursing modes.
Four different nursing modes (primary, modular, team and functional nursing) were not consistently associated with stress. Statistically significant associations involved only certain features of these modes and specific components of stress. After the effects of demographic and ward characteristics were controlled for, hierarchical regression analyses showed that opportunity to write nursing notes decreased the likelihood of nurses' stress because of problems in interpersonal relationships. Writing nursing notes is common in patient-focused nursing modes (primary and modular nursing). Other features of nursing modes were not associated with stress.
In general, nursing mode is not associated with stressful job characteristics. However, certain aspects of patient-focused nursing reduce the likelihood of interpersonal problems among staff.
PubMed ID
12834378 View in PubMed
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Organization of nursing care as a determinant of job satisfaction among hospital nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183996
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):299-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Arja Mäkinen
Mika Kivimäki
Marko Elovainio
Marianna Virtanen
Senga Bond
Author Affiliation
Administrative Head Nurse, Division of Applied Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. arja.makinen@satshp.fi
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):299-306
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Finland
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Models, Nursing
Nurse's Role
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Records
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing, Team - organization & administration
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Primary Nursing - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Workload
Abstract
This study examined the relationship between methods of organizing nursing and employee satisfaction. Data were collected from 26 ward sisters and 568 nurses working in 26 bed wards with different stabilized nursing models. Methods of organizing nursing, such as primary, modular, team and functional nursing, were associated with job satisfaction. However, this association involved only certain features of these organizational models and specific components of satisfaction. After the effects of demographic and ward characteristics were partialed out, hierarchical regression analyses showed that patient-focused work allocation, opportunity to write nursing notes and accountability for patient care contributed to nurses' satisfaction with supervision and personal growth. The relationships of duty rota and liaison with other discipline to job satisfaction were weaker or non-existing.
PubMed ID
12930535 View in PubMed
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Sickness absence and the organization of nursing care among hospital nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176724
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004 Dec;30(6):468-76; quiz 476
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Mika Kivimäki
Arja Mäkinen
Marko Elovainio
Jussi Vahtera
Marianna Virtanen
Jenny Firth-Cozens
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki and the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. mika.kivimaki@ttl.fi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004 Dec;30(6):468-76; quiz 476
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration
Patient care team
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Primary nursing and team nursing are two different ways of organizing nurses' work in hospital wards. This study examined whether primary nursing is associated with lower sickness absence rates than team nursing is.
Altogether 1213 nurses from 13 primary nursing wards and 13 team nursing wards participated in a 3-year observational study. The nurses' sickness absence records were linked with information on the organization of nursing in the wards.
After adjustment for demographic and ward characteristics, primary nursing, compared with team nursing, was associated with 26-42% higher annual rates of short (1-3 days) spells of sickness absence (P3 days) absences, depending on the year (P
PubMed ID
15633598 View in PubMed
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